Photoshop Wedding Invitations

Johnny Manf

WHATCHA GONNA DO BROTHER?!?!
Oct 13, 2004
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#1
I was wondering if anyone ever had any luck designing wedding invitations in Photoshop. Me and the old lady are having a movie themed wedding and really want to customize our invites. We have looked at a couple professional ones but there's nothing too great.

I'm a beginner in photoshop but I can pick it rather quickly.

Anyone know a good site that might have a walkthrough or examples?
or does anyone have any tips on how to begin.

If not, then no big deal but I'd figure I'd ask before I go at it on my own.
 
Dec 8, 2004
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#2
You would be better served doing them in Illustrator... as the images and such would be vector based... more gooder for printing.
 

stellarcomics

Registered User
Jul 25, 2005
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#3
I wouldn't design an invitation in a photo-editing program.
Use Illustrator, or InDesign. Hell, use MS Word if you have to.
 

sobi

Registered User
Mar 29, 2005
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#4
I did mine in photoshop. The only reason the above comments hold any water is for when you don't know what size your going to be doing. If you have all measurements, photoshop works fine. If your going to need to change the sizes on things, and create large format designs, then go with illustrator or indesign. For my wedding programs, I used indesign. Everything else was photoshop.
 

martianvirus

READY THE ANALPROBES!!!!!!!!
Nov 20, 2005
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#6
Doing it in photoshop is fine. It's done all the time in the real world. Just make sure the document's resolution is at least 200-300. More then that is overkill. And god please, don't use ms word.
 

Hudson

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Jan 14, 2002
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#7
Doing it in photoshop is fine. It's done all the time in the real world. Just make sure the document's resolution is at least 200-300. More then that is overkill. And god please, don't use ms word.
I was going to say the same..agreed
 

sobi

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Mar 29, 2005
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#8
Doing it in photoshop is fine. It's done all the time in the real world. Just make sure the document's resolution is at least 200-300. More then that is overkill. And god please, don't use ms word.

Actually, you don't want to go under 300. That is an industry minimum. Sure, you could print under that, but the end result isn't going to be as nice. Realisticly, high end stuff gets done in the 2000's
 

dodisman

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Feb 20, 2005
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#9
can't you just use Photoshop and then convert into Smart Object for editing in Ilustrator
 

martianvirus

READY THE ANALPROBES!!!!!!!!
Nov 20, 2005
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#10
Actually, you don't want to go under 300. That is an industry minimum. Sure, you could print under that, but the end result isn't going to be as nice. Realisticly, high end stuff gets done in the 2000's
Holy shit you have no idea what your talking about.
 

dodisman

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Feb 20, 2005
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#11
yeah i thought Professional at 350 would suffice, no?
 

PDX909

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May 12, 2007
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#13
Most common (and economical) digital presses run at 600 but a postscript file output at 300 would work for most line art and typographic work.
 

stellarcomics

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Jul 25, 2005
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#14
Most common (and economical) digital presses run at 600 but a postscript file output at 300 would work for most line art and typographic work.
You're confusing lines-per-inch (press screens) with dots per inch (images on computers). For what he's trying to do, 300 dpi is plenty.


… and you guys knew I was kidding about MS Word, right? :)
 

Johnny Manf

WHATCHA GONNA DO BROTHER?!?!
Oct 13, 2004
691
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National Park, NJ
#15
thanks for all the advice.
i'm designing a few things and ordering a few things.
i actually found good invites for my theme to order. stuff like place cards and junk like that i am going to make to go along with the invite's theme. i did get illustrator to mess around with too.
 

HumpX

Character Assassin
Oct 30, 2004
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#16
Manf, there are plenty of applications you can get from places like downloads.com that have templates for invitations etc. Most have a 30 free trial so it would give you plenty of time to do it.
 

TheDrip

I'm bi-winning.
Jan 9, 2006
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#17
My fiance just designed ours....she used photoshop rather than illustrator, and set at 300dpi. Had Bay Photo Lab do the printing: http://www.bayphoto.com/

They came back just perfect.
 

sobi

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Mar 29, 2005
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#18
Holy shit you have no idea what your talking about.

Really? I hope my employer doesn't find out, because I handle specs for kodak proofing machines that run the "press bible" for companies like Polo Ralph Lauren, Jones NY, and Michael Kors. 4 years in gang run printing also must have seen a lot of my nutty theories too.::hammer:

The reason you probably aren't familiar with such rediculously high resolutions, is because like I said... it's for super high end stuff like film proofing. A single proof (1 sheet of paper) will cost a company a couple hundred dollars. These are run at outlandishly high res specs because the printhouses use that one sheet to base all printing specs off of. We run a proof for someone like polo, and that proof is what the pressman uses to base what the end product should look like. That goes from print one up to however many (going into the millions) copies they print for ad campaigns, and brocures.
For run of the mill stuff, 300 is fine. In gang run, we have printed as low as 150, but ask any prepress person who knows his ass from his elbow, and they will tell you once you start going below 300, you start losing a bit of quality (though almost unnoticable from 250-300 for someone not in the industry)
 

sobi

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Mar 29, 2005
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#19
PS - resolution is so high on these things too because we read color densities measured down to 100ths, and must be within an acceptable 6 hundreth range. IE - acceptable range on cyan would be between1.37 & 1.43 out of an x-rite color reader and read through apple proofcheck software.
 

Hey_Asshole

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Feb 21, 2007
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#20
We run x-rite standards of plus or minus .5 for sheetfed work which is 130 line screen I believe, and plus or minus .10 at 120 line screen on our non heatset webs (unless running 4 color process). I havent a clue what they run on the nexpress digital. At this point that is outta my league.
 

sobi

Registered User
Mar 29, 2005
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#21
What we do isn't possible on a press... not when it's going to run thousands of copies. Seriously, I don't even see a point. It's nothing more than a system to justify the job of some schmuck on madison avenue. They have people like Ralph Lauren convinced that this type of detail makes a difference. They are oblivious to the fact that when it goes to press, all that extreme detail we put into things go down the crapper when you run X hundred M runs.
 

Hey_Asshole

Man, Beer, Wild
Feb 21, 2007
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#22
What we do isn't possible on a press... not when it's going to run thousands of copies. Seriously, I don't even see a point. It's nothing more than a system to justify the job of some schmuck on madison avenue. They have people like Ralph Lauren convinced that this type of detail makes a difference. They are oblivious to the fact that when it goes to press, all that extreme detail we put into things go down the crapper when you run X hundred M runs.
Agreed! What the customer doesnt know, wont hurt them. As long as the customer samples are at standard.
 

Lil' Alex

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Dec 20, 2007
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#23
Does DPI come into play when you're not scanning in documents? I'm not talking about the print here but the creation of the document. To me the higher the resolution the better, you can always scale it down later but you can't scale it up without losing quality.
 

sobi

Registered User
Mar 29, 2005
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#24
yeah. To be honest, the best bet is to always start with 300 DPI and do a document size from roughly a 8.5x11 to an 11x17. That usually gives you more than enough size to do whatever you need. Of course if you're doing a logo or something like that, your best bet is to do it in illustrator or at the very least, make it in photoshop but make sure it's made of paths and saved as a shape.


PS - if you have a recent version of Photoshop, you can make things smart objects, and allows you to up the size without (too much) quality loss.