Plane Enthusiast Constructs Aeroplane Cockpit Simulator At Home

d0uche_n0zzle

**Negative_Creep**
Sep 15, 2004
46,847
6,935
763
F.U.B.A.R
#2
Surprised he doesn't wear an actual pilots uniform when 'flying'.
 

Psychopath

I want to fuck your girlfriend.
Dec 28, 2008
19,156
3,686
393
Constant sate of misery
#4
The simulators that fighter pilots probably don't look as good. With the money he spends on that setup why doesn't he just go for a pilots license?
 

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
Jul 24, 2005
22,541
13,853
608
Idaho
#5
The simulators that fighter pilots probably don't look as good. With the money he spends on that setup why doesn't he just go for a pilots license?
 

Biff Hardslab

I have the t-shirt
Jan 15, 2007
4,564
2,485
498
#8
Since our base (Charleston A.F.B.) was going to be the first to get the C-17, McDonnell Douglas moved 2 simulators to the base. I was working the gate one night and one of the McDonnell guys pulls up and shows me his badge. I asked him who I needed to know to see the simulators. He said, "Me, I run the night shift. Come down anytime."

I took him up on it. It ranks in the top 10 things I've ever done. It was as close to actually flying as you could get without being in the plane.

It was a pod that sat on hydraulic stilts. You had to go up some stairs and across a catwalk to get inside. Once inside and the door shut, you forgot the outside world existed. The sounds, the air circulating in the cockpit, the view of the Charleston Airport outside the windows...all made you feel like you were in an airplane. He told me sit in the pilots seat and put the seatbelt on. He went to a console and told me to put the headphones on. He talked me through taxing across the airfield. Once I got it lined up on the runway, he told me to push the throttle up. Holy shit, it felt like we were going somewhere. The hydraulics added such a real effect. If you've been in an airplane taking off, that's the exact same feeling I got in the simulator. Once airborne, I pulled the stick back to far, stalled, and crashed into the ground.

The next attempt went better and I was able to get the plane airborne, lift the landing gear, adjust the flaps and "fly" around Charleston. When it was time to land, he set the computer to put me 50 miles from the runway on approach. He talked me in and I was actually able to land without crashing. It was great. This was 1990's technology. I'd love to see what they have today.

There is a place in Las Vegas that offers the same experience in a 737 simulator for about $900 an hour.

http://airlinecaptainforaday.com/




 

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
Jul 24, 2005
22,541
13,853
608
Idaho
#9
A friend got to do the same thing at the Learjet factory once. He took off alright and flew about a mile then augered in. He also crashed short of the runway on his next try, but the other guy wasn't helping him any.

He said simulator time counts as actual flight time, it is so realistic.
 

d0uche_n0zzle

**Negative_Creep**
Sep 15, 2004
46,847
6,935
763
F.U.B.A.R
#11
Since our base (Charleston A.F.B.) was going to be the first to get the C-17, McDonnell Douglas moved 2 simulators to the base. I was working the gate one night and one of the McDonnell guys pulls up and shows me his badge. I asked him who I needed to know to see the simulators. He said, "Me, I run the night shift. Come down anytime."

I took him up on it. It ranks in the top 10 things I've ever done. It was as close to actually flying as you could get without being in the plane.

It was a pod that sat on hydraulic stilts. You had to go up some stairs and across a catwalk to get inside. Once inside and the door shut, you forgot the outside world existed. The sounds, the air circulating in the cockpit, the view of the Charleston Airport outside the windows...all made you feel like you were in an airplane. He told me sit in the pilots seat and put the seatbelt on. He went to a console and told me to put the headphones on. He talked me through taxing across the airfield. Once I got it lined up on the runway, he told me to push the throttle up. Holy shit, it felt like we were going somewhere. The hydraulics added such a real effect. If you've been in an airplane taking off, that's the exact same feeling I got in the simulator. Once airborne, I pulled the stick back to far, stalled, and crashed into the ground.

The next attempt went better and I was able to get the plane airborne, lift the landing gear, adjust the flaps and "fly" around Charleston. When it was time to land, he set the computer to put me 50 miles from the runway on approach. He talked me in and I was actually able to land without crashing. It was great. This was 1990's technology. I'd love to see what they have today.

There is a place in Las Vegas that offers the same experience in a 737 simulator for about $900 an hour.

http://airlinecaptainforaday.com/





I would ended flying into some building for shits n giggles. One the main reasons I love GTA.