President Obama leaves a blind Chinese protestor out to dry.

VMS

Victim of high standards and low personal skills.
Apr 26, 2006
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Link

Ok, ok, it's about China so Rink

Spoilered for length.

Dissident’s Plea for Protection From China Deepens Crisis
By MARK LANDLER, JANE PERLEZ and STEVEN LEE MYERS

WASHINGTON — The Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng’s abrupt reversal and plea for protection from the United States has deepened a diplomatic crisis and exposed the Obama administration to withering criticism that its diplomats miscalculated when they negotiated his departure from the American Embassy in Beijing.

Mr. Chen’s request for help from Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton — repeated in an urgent telephone call played on speaker during an emergency Congressional hearing on Thursday — frayed a fragile deal American officials negotiated a day before the start of high-level talks between China and the United States.

Mr. Chen has now proposed that he and his family be allowed to visit the United States temporarily, rather than request permanent asylum there, according to an American lawyer, Jerome A. Cohen, who has advised him this week. The proposal, Mr. Cohen said, could be a face-saving solution for China, defusing a situation that threatens relations between the two countries.

As the State Department tried frantically to reassess the options for Mr. Chen, who is now at a hospital in Beijing being treated for an injured foot, senior American officials privately acknowledged missteps in the handling of the case. The United States failed to guarantee access to Mr. Chen at the hospital, they said, leaving him isolated and fearful that China would renege on its pledge not to harass him and to allow him to resume his legal studies.

The diplomats also rushed their negotiations with the Chinese government to try to resolve the situation before the start of two days of talks with China on economic and security issues, led by Mrs. Clinton and Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner, these officials said. That left no time to obtain firm, detailed assurances from Chinese officials on how they would treat Mr. Chen, a blind lawyer and activist who had been exposed to years of house arrest and beatings in his home village in eastern China and last month escaped to the United States Embassy in Beijing.

With Mr. Chen expressing fears for his safety and pleading for President Obama to intercede on his behalf, the administration faced a barrage of criticism from Republican lawmakers and human rights activists that its bungled handling of the case had left one of China’s most prominent dissidents at the mercy of the Chinese police.

The Chen case has rapidly become an issue on the campaign trail, with Mitt Romney, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, accusing the American diplomats of racing to reach an agreement with China and then failing to verify it.

“We’ve heard some disturbing things from across the world that suggest that, potentially, if the reports are true, some very troubling developments there,” he said on Thursday in Portsmouth, Va. “If these reports are true, this is a dark day for freedom and it’s a day of shame for the Obama administration.”

The administration defended its actions, saying it had made extraordinary efforts to bring Mr. Chen to safety inside the embassy and honor his wishes once there. Mr. Chen, officials said, had left of his own free will after a plan had been worked out with the Chinese government that he and his family could relocate to a city close to Beijing where he would pursue his law studies.

“At no point during his time in the embassy did Mr. Chen ever request political asylum in the U.S.,” said the White House press secretary, Jay Carney. “And at every opportunity, he expressed his desire to stay in China, reunify with his family, continue his education and work for reforming his country. All of our diplomacy was directed at putting him in the best possible position to achieve his objectives.”

Guo Yushan, a friend of Mr. Chen’s who spoke to him by phone Thursday night, said Mr. Chen was not interested in seeking asylum outside the country; his desire, he said, was to go to the United States for a few months and then return to China. “He never complained, either directly or indirectly, that the American Embassy had ‘forced’ or induced him to leave the embassy,” Mr. Guo wrote on Twitter and Weibo, a Chinese microblog service. “He left the embassy voluntarily and appreciates from his heart the American Embassy’s help during the past week.”

The messy fraying of the diplomacy has put the administration’s top China advisers under scrutiny — as well as its broader policy, which has treated human rights concerns as one issue among many in the complex relationship between the United States and China.

The two Americans who led the negotiations — Kurt M. Campbell, assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, and Harold H. Koh, the State Department’s legal adviser — are seasoned diplomats. Mr. Koh, a former dean of Yale Law School, is a prominent legal scholar on human rights issues. Mr. Campbell has deep Asian experience, though he is viewed as more of an expert on Japan than China.

Gary Locke, the American ambassador to China who was also a crucial negotiator, is a Chinese-American lawyer, former Commerce secretary and governor of Washington. But he is working in China for the first time.

In Washington, the Obama administration lost two of its most experienced China experts with the departure this year of Jeffrey A. Bader as senior director for Asia at the National Security Council, and James B. Steinberg as deputy secretary of state.

By contrast, the lead negotiator for China, Cui Tiankai, the vice minister for foreign affairs, has worked on the United States for more than three decades.

On Capitol Hill, lawmakers and human-rights activists questioned the administration’s actions and assailed China’s record of human-rights abuses. Speaking at a hearing of a commission on China, Representative Frank R. Wolf, Republican of Virginia, said, “it is hard to comprehend why the administration would accept at face value assurances that Chen would be safe upon exiting U.S. protection.”

At one point, the commission’s chairman, Representative Christopher H. Smith, Republican of New Jersey, left the room and returned to announce that Mr. Chen was on the phone from his hospital room in Beijing.

Mr. Chen reiterated his desire to travel to the United States, though not necessarily to seek asylum. “I want to meet with the Secretary Clinton,” he said in remarks translated by Bo Fu, a Christian pastor who has championed Mr. Chen and others facing repression in China. “I hope I can get more help from her.”

Several China experts noted that the State Department team also could have anticipated that a verbal agreement with China’s Foreign Ministry, which is not considered among the most powerful organizations inside the Chinese bureaucracy, would not necessarily constrain the actions of security forces. Plainclothes security officers moved in and restricted access to Mr. Chen shortly after he left the American Embassy and entered a Beijing hospital, causing him to worry for his safety soon after he gave up American protection.

Privately, administration officials acknowledged they had not followed through at the hospital, where Mr. Chen, after talking to his wife, began to fear for the safety of his family, and where their access to him remained restricted on Thursday.

In retrospect, the officials said, the American negotiators could also have paid more attention to Mr. Chen’s wife, Yuan Weijing, and the effects of her reunification with her husband in the hospital, American officials said.

Mr. Chen told reporters and friends in telephone calls from the hospital that he was outraged by threats his wife had received from security guards at their house after he escaped.

“The opportunity for a tactical victory was very powerful,” said Christopher K. Johnson of the Center for Strategic and International Studies who until recently was a senior China analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency. “Looking at the possible strategic downside didn’t occur to them.”

Mr. Cohen, the lawyer and an expert in Chinese law, said Mr. Chen’s mood swung wildly at the hospital, something the Americans failed to anticipate. “They may have relied too much on his emotional stability,” he said. “And they should have at least negotiated to have stayed with him at the hospital overnight.”

One person who knows Mr. Chen said it was not surprising that he became unnerved once American officials left, after days of marathon negotiations, all conducted through translators.

After years of living in semi-solitary confinement, his fears appeared to have been magnified in the unfamiliar environment. He was also upset that his dinner was not delivered by 9 p.m. Wednesday, telling a friend that “retaliation” had begun.

On Thursday night, Mr. Chen appeared to temper some of his earlier statements, in particular his assertion that American diplomats had pressured him into leaving the embassy. The comments suggested that Mr. Chen was not fully aware of the crisis his comments caused the day before. “He was totally astonished by this and felt very sorry for the pressure on the American Embassy created by these reports,” Mr. Guo wrote.

Mark Landler and Steven Lee Myers reported from Washington, and Jane Perlez from Beijing. Reporting was contributed by Sharon LaFraniere and Michael Wines from Beijing, Andrew Jacobs from New York, and Ashley Parker from Portsmouth, Va. Edy Yin, Li Bibo and Mia Li contributed research from Beijing.

I'll be honest: the only reason I'm putting this story up is for this picture:
 

Norm Stansfield

私は亀が好きだ。
Mar 17, 2009
15,949
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#2
Don't be silly. He just went to be reunited with his family. And get medical treatment.

Did the White House even bother to invent a medical condition for him, that would require specialized treatment he can only get in a Chinese gulag?
 

Don the Radio Guy

G-Bb-A-D
Donator
Mar 30, 2006
69,623
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#7
China didn't try to assassinate a democrat saint and provides slave labor.
 
Aug 11, 2005
27,637
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#8
.00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000009

a dozen

YaY Obama!
 

Von Maestro

Registered User
Mar 12, 2010
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tss tss I bet he never even saw that one comin or sumpthin tss tss
 

Hoffman

Guess who's back? Hoffman's back
Sep 28, 2006
34,674
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#10
...and he get's a fellowship at an American University...

The US says it expects China to allow prominent dissident Chen Guangcheng to travel abroad soon.

The US state department said Mr Chen had been offered a fellowship at an American university, and it would allow his wife and children to accompany him.

Earlier, Beijing said the blind activist could apply to study abroad - paving the way for a resolution to a tense diplomatic stand-off with the US.

Mr Chen fled house arrest last month and spent six days in the US embassy.

He left but now says he wants to go to the US with his family.

His case has overshadowed high-level US-China talks taking place in Beijing.

"Mr Chen has been offered a fellowship from an American university, where he can be accompanied by his wife and two children," US State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said in a statement.

She said the US expected Beijing to process their application for travel documents "expeditiously".

"The United States government would then give visa requests for him and his immediate family priority attention," the statement added.


Clinton: "This is... about the human rights and aspirations of a billion people."
Earlier, Xinhua news agency quoted foreign ministry spokesman Liu Weimin as saying: "If he wishes to study overseas, as a Chinese citizen, he can, like any other Chinese citizens, process relevant procedures with relevant departments through normal channels in accordance with the law."

Following an annual strategic dialogue between the US and China, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said she was "encouraged" by the Chinese statement.

"Progress has been made to help him have the future he wants," she told a news conference in Beijing.

Mrs Clinton also confirmed that the US ambassador in Beijing had spoken to Mr Chen by phone on Friday, and that an embassy doctor had been able to visit him.

Media attack
The dissident is currently in a Beijing hospital, sealed off by Chinese police.

Mr Chen spent a week in the US embassy but left after initially accepting China's assurances of his safety.

However, he subsequently said that he only realised the full extent of the threats against his family members after he left the embassy.

He told the Associated Press news agency that his wife was being followed and filmed by unidentified men whenever she was allowed to leave the hospital.

China had earlier demanded an apology from the US for sheltering Mr Chen in its embassy.

One of China's main official newspapers, the Beijing Daily, accused the dissident of being "a tool and a pawn for American politicians to blacken China".

Mr Chen, 40, is a lawyer who has campaigned against forced abortions and sterilisations of women under China's policy of one child per family.

The case has increasing political resonance in the US. Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney has said that if reports that Mr Chen had been persuaded to leave the embassy were true, it was "a day of shame for the Obama administration".
Ah! fenrir is in here as I post. this. fenrir must have worked this deal out!
 

VMS

Victim of high standards and low personal skills.
Apr 26, 2006
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#11
I'll be happy if this all works out, but how the fuck did President Bumbler's administration manage to fuck this up so badly?

Isn't it obvious that the embassy should have gotten assurances that they would have access to him in the hospital? To get basic protection for him before they released him to the Chinese?
 

Party Rooster

Unleash The Beast
Apr 27, 2005
40,284
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#12
I'll be happy if this all works out, but how the fuck did President Bumbler's administration manage to fuck this up so badly?

Isn't it obvious that the embassy should have gotten assurances that they would have access to him in the hospital? To get basic protection for him before they released him to the Chinese?
China has known for quite a while that they have us by the balls, looks like at least this one has a happy ending too I guess.

China had earlier demanded an apology from the US for sheltering Mr Chen in its embassy.
Any word on the Apologizer-in-Chief yet on this? Maybe he'll just save face and say that he just "regrets" the whole incident. :icon_cool

Well, good thing we didn't have a couple dozen embassy workers taken hostage for 10 days, that would have been horrible.
http://carnegieendowment.org/2001/04/09/national-humiliation/2m0m
 

NuttyJim

Registered User
Feb 18, 2006
14,118
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#14
who gives a fuck about this guy, really? You fuck up in your own country, that's your problem. We got enough of our own problems to have to worry about a shit stirrer in China.
 

VMS

Victim of high standards and low personal skills.
Apr 26, 2006
10,309
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#15
who gives a fuck about this guy, really? You fuck up in your own country, that's your problem. We got enough of our own problems to have to worry about a shit stirrer in China.
Fine and dandy. Until they make it onto our soil. Then they're on OUR soil and it becomes our problem.

And the US embassy is our fucking soil.
 

NuttyJim

Registered User
Feb 18, 2006
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#17
Fine and dandy. Until they make it onto our soil. Then they're on OUR soil and it becomes our problem.

And the US embassy is our fucking soil.
yeah, I completely understand that. But don't stir shit up under the guise of being an "activist" and being apart of a "human rights campaign" and when shit gets tough and you start getting scared run to the embassy of another country and try to plead for asylum. It's a pussy move.

I didn't realize there was this many sore vagina's over a fucking chinamen. It's kinda like that video of the guy poking the leopard. You don't fuck with the leopard unless you're prepared to get tore the fuck up.

[video=youtube;tn0r88RJFD4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tn0r88RJFD4[/video]
 

VMS

Victim of high standards and low personal skills.
Apr 26, 2006
10,309
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#18
yeah, I completely understand that. But don't stir shit up under the guise of being an "activist" and being apart of a "human rights campaign" and when shit gets tough and you start getting scared run to the embassy of another country and try to plead for asylum. It's a pussy move.

I didn't realize there was this many sore vagina's over a fucking chinamen. It's kinda like that video of the guy poking the leopard. You don't fuck with the leopard unless you're prepared to get tore the fuck up.
What part of "he made it our problem when he got into our embassy" don't you understand?

You say you understand it. But then you proceed to completely not get it.

Is he a pussy for running into our embassy? Fine. He's a pussy. He's got the balls to stand up (even if he runs afterwards) to the Chinese fucking government. You're brave enough to call guys like that a pussy from the internet behind a username while living in a country where you can call the President a nigger and nobody will put you in jail for it. Wooooooooooooooooooooooo. If he's a pussy, what the fuck does that make all of us?

So he's a pussy. Once he makes it into our embassy (and fine, both the Chinese guards outside our embassy in Beijing and our own embassy guard detail need to figure out how this guy got in without being stopped) he was under our care. Period. It doesn't matter if he's a pussy, if we don't like him, if he's a baby r@pist, if he's a cannibal, if he's a coward, whatever. Once he's on US soil, he has our motherfucking protection. It isn't about him, you fucktard. It's about US. If Chen is a pussy for running to supposed safety when he feels his life is in danger, what kind of fucking cowards are WE for turning him back over to the Chinese government?
 

Psychopath

I want to fuck your girlfriend.
Dec 28, 2008
19,173
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#19
What part of "he made it our problem when he got into our embassy" don't you understand?

You say you understand it. But then you proceed to completely not get it.

Is he a pussy for running into our embassy? Fine. He's a pussy. He's got the balls to stand up (even if he runs afterwards) to the Chinese fucking government. You're brave enough to call guys like that a pussy from the internet behind a username while living in a country where you can call the President a nigger and nobody will put you in jail for it. Wooooooooooooooooooooooo. If he's a pussy, what the fuck does that make all of us?

So he's a pussy. Once he makes it into our embassy (and fine, both the Chinese guards outside our embassy in Beijing and our own embassy guard detail need to figure out how this guy got in without being stopped) he was under our care. Period. It doesn't matter if he's a pussy, if we don't like him, if he's a baby r@pist, if he's a cannibal, if he's a coward, whatever. Once he's on US soil, he has our motherfucking protection. It isn't about him, you fucktard. It's about US. If Chen is a pussy for running to supposed safety when he feels his life is in danger, what kind of fucking cowards are WE for turning him back over to the Chinese government?
QFT ma fuckah
 

NuttyJim

Registered User
Feb 18, 2006
14,118
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#20
What part of "he made it our problem when he got into our embassy" don't you understand?
Um...The United States made it OUR problem once we allowed this guy to stay a week on the Embassy grounds once he made it there after escaping house arrest. There is nothing that states that we are bound to keep him there even if he requests "Asylum". This guy is tied in with celebrities and politicians. He is nothing but "leverage" for political purposes. So then what do we do, grant every Chinese citizen who cries asylum because of what the government is doing to their people? Do we let this guy stay but look the other way if the Chinese Government parades the streets with his families head on a stick?

You're brave enough to call guys like that a pussy from the internet behind a username while living in a country where you can call the President a ****** and nobody will put you in jail for it. Wooooooooooooooooooooooo. If he's a pussy, what the fuck does that make all of us?
You know what, you're absolutely right. Remind me of all this when I or anyone else in this country starts to fucking run to the Chinese, Saudi, Iranian Embassy crying for asylum because it sucks so damn bad here. And me calling him a pussy has nothing to do with being "brave while living behind a screen name in a civilized country", it's common fucking sense. I've been to "chop chop square" in Riyadh and seen what they do to motherfuckers who go against the government or break the law. I've stood in the middle of the square watching guys get whipped and their hands cut off for stealing. If that ain't a god damn clue to straight up and fly right, I don't know what to tell you.

So he's a pussy. Once he makes it into our embassy (and fine, both the Chinese guards outside our embassy in Beijing and our own embassy guard detail need to figure out how this guy got in without being stopped) he was under our care. Period. It doesn't matter if he's a pussy, if we don't like him, if he's a baby r@pist, if he's a cannibal, if he's a coward, whatever. Once he's on US soil, he has our motherfucking protection. It isn't about him, you fucktard. It's about US.
The decision to "take care of him and let him stay a week" was not decided by the Marine Security Detachment. The guy obviously has connections with the Ambassador and other people inside the Embassy. If they make the decision then that's on them, all I'm saying is that it is a decision I wouldn't make. If they decide to protect him, then protect him. It also isn't definitely about us, it's about not attempting to not further piss off the people who control our economy and who is loaning us money.

If Chen is a pussy for running to supposed safety when he feels his life is in danger, what kind of fucking cowards are WE for turning him back over to the Chinese government?
Do you realize the number of insurgents and other criminals we turn back over to the Afghans or Iraqi's? Or play the "I'll trade you these guys for this guy game" with? So don't play the whole bleeding heart / amnesty international card shit with me.
 

VMS

Victim of high standards and low personal skills.
Apr 26, 2006
10,309
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#21
Um...The United States made it OUR problem once we allowed this guy to stay a week on the Embassy grounds once he made it there after escaping house arrest. There is nothing that states that we are bound to keep him there even if he requests "Asylum". This guy is tied in with celebrities and politicians. He is nothing but "leverage" for political purposes. So then what do we do, grant every Chinese citizen who cries asylum because of what the government is doing to their people? Do we let this guy stay but look the other way if the Chinese Government parades the streets with his families head on a stick?



You know what, you're absolutely right. Remind me of all this when I or anyone else in this country starts to fucking run to the Chinese, Saudi, Iranian Embassy crying for asylum because it sucks so damn bad here. And me calling him a pussy has nothing to do with being "brave while living behind a screen name in a civilized country", it's common fucking sense. I've been to "chop chop square" in Riyadh and seen what they do to motherfuckers who go against the government or break the law. I've stood in the middle of the square watching guys get whipped and their hands cut off for stealing. If that ain't a god damn clue to straight up and fly right, I don't know what to tell you.



The decision to "take care of him and let him stay a week" was not decided by the Marine Security Detachment. The guy obviously has connections with the Ambassador and other people inside the Embassy. If they make the decision then that's on them, all I'm saying is that it is a decision I wouldn't make. If they decide to protect him, then protect him. It also isn't definitely about us, it's about not attempting to not further piss off the people who control our economy and who is loaning us money.



Do you realize the number of insurgents and other criminals we turn back over to the Afghans or Iraqi's? Or play the "I'll trade you these guys for this guy game" with? So don't play the whole bleeding heart / amnesty international card shit with me.
Yes. It's called extradition. It requires a process to return the accused to the nation where he was charged with a crime. Part of that process is that the crime in question is actually a crime in US jurisdiction, or at the very least that the crime in question is not a political crime. Chen's crime was by definition a political crime: he was charged with bringing a lawsuit against the city of Linyi. He served his full prison term but was still under house arrest beyond his prison term. He was a political prisoner.

The US does not extradite political prisoners. If there is a real crime in conjunction with a political crime, then it becomes hazy, but there wasn't a real crime in this situation: Chen straight up brought a lawsuit up against a municipal authority and was shanghaied into confinement for it.

Extradition is a process. There's a procedure to follow. It's why this is called a REPUBLIC, you idiot: we have laws and procedures and we fucking follow them. The US Embassy in Beijing failed to follow those procedures.

Seriously, Chen had friends on the inside who got him in, but then those same friends failed to protect him when he wanted out? Even if that's 100% true, that just shows that the personnel at the Beijing embassy (including President Obama's former Commerce Secretary who is now the ambassador to China) are fucking amateurs who dropped the fucking ball.