Pussy Riot - get a load of these shitheads

Norm Stansfield

私は亀が好きだ。
Mar 17, 2009
15,949
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#1
Here's an idea on how to get Russians on your side: find the biggest Cathedral, and do this:
[yt]grEBLskpDWQ[/yt]

Guess who's spending their youth in a Russian prison now. But don't fret, Madonna is on the case:
http://www.billboard.com/news/madon...-up-for-pussy-riot-in-moscow-1007776552.story

Madonna is the latest high-profile celebrity to throw her support behind three jailed members of the Russian feminist punk band Pussy Riot, calling the women "courageous" during a lengthy speech while performing in Moscow.



A hearing for the highly publicized band is in progress in a Moscow court and drawing international attention, and during a concert in Moscow, the queen of pop appeared onstage with the words "Pussy Riot" stenciled on her back (see photo). Not necessarily related to the political firestorm, the venue had received threats against U.S. citizens attending the Madonna concert and issued a warning to attendees.



Madonna Concerts Threatened With Violence in Russia



The Pussy Riot story has snowballed far beyond Russian borders. A primer: The three young women were arrested in the wake of an illegal gig, which Pussy Riot staged in March at Moscow's the Cathedral of Christ the Savior, the country's main Orthodox church, shortly before the presidential vote that brought Vladimir Putin back to the country's top office.

In late July, Amnesty International said it considers the women to be prisoners of conscience, detained solely for the peaceful expression of their beliefs, and called on the Russia authorities to immediately release the trio.
 

Don the Radio Guy

G-Bb-A-D
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Mar 30, 2006
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#3
Now this makes sense. Was wondering what the video of an Asian guy playing Starcraft had to do with anything.
 

Norm Stansfield

私は亀が好きだ。
Mar 17, 2009
15,949
4,075
328
#6
Now this makes sense. Was wondering what the video of an Asian guy playing Starcraft had to do with anything.
Caught that did ya? It was a good game though, watched it last night.
 

SOS

ONA
Wackbag Staff
Aug 14, 2000
48,198
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#7
Dec 8, 2004
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#11
Keeping in classy...

[h=2]Topless woman cuts down Kiev cross for Pussy Riot





An activist from women's rights group Femen uses a chainsaw to cut down an Orthodox cross, erected in memory of victims of political repressions under the Soviet dictator Josef Stalin regime, near the Oktyabrsky Palace in central Kiev.[/h]
The young woman staged her protest as a Russian court was due to deliver a verdict on three Pussy Riot members for performing a political “punk prayer” at the altar of Moscow’s main cathedral — a case that has been criticised by free-speech advocates around the world.

To show solidarity with the Pussy Riot defendants, Inna Shevchenko, a member of the Ukrainian group Femen which often stages bare-breasted shock performances, destroyed the four-metre high wooden cross bearing the figure of Christ.

The cross, erected in 2005 on a hilltop looking down on the city centre, also served as a memorial to the victims of Stalinist repression and the famine of the 1930s. Two other activists used ropes to direct the fall of the cross.

“No business, not even one as successful as the church, has the right to attack women’s rights,” Shevchenko, 22, a veteran of several Femen protests, said after bringing down the cross.

A criminal case has been formally opened for hooliganism in connection with the incident, police spokesman Ihor Mykhalko said. The maximum sentence for the offence is four years in jail.

Shevchenko, who had “Free Riot” written across her chest and arms, demonstratively crossed herself Orthodox-style before taking the chain saw to the cross.

Afterwards she posed for photographers with her arms spread-eagled. There were no police at the scene.

Femen’s move seems certain to trigger outrage, both among religious groups in the predominantly Orthodox Christian country and among relatives of the millions of victims of famine and repression that took place under Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin.

The cross had been installed near the former Kiev headquarters of the Soviet NKVD state security agency which was the main instrument of Stalin's purges.

Friday’s move represented a departure for Femen activists previously known for baring their breasts at public events to highlight their campaign against prostitution and sex tourism.

When Ukraine hosted the European soccer championship in June - a popular event that many Ukrainians saw as recognition of the country’s place in the European mainstream — Femen used the event to stage high-visibility protests.

Femen activists attempted to steal the championship’s trophy and held several protests in the official Kiev “fan zone” where thousands of foreign tourists were gathered.
Link

More picts here.... obviously NSFW...
 
Dec 8, 2004
49,333
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Maine
#12
***Follow Up***

Enjoy prison girls...

Pussy Riot members sentenced to 2 years in prison

MOSCOW – A Moscow judge sentenced three members of the provocative punk band Pussy Riot to two years in prison each on hooliganism charges on Friday following a trial that has drawn international outrage as an emblem of Russia's intolerance of dissent.

The trial sparked a wave of protests around the world in support of the feminist rockers, who have been dubbed prisoners of conscience by international rights group. Hundreds of Pussy Riot supporters chanted "Russia without Putin!" amid a heavy police presence outside the courtroom, and several opposition leaders were detained.

The three were arrested in March after a guerrilla performance in Moscow's main cathedral, high-kicking and dancing while singing a "punk prayer" pleading the Virgin Mary to save Russia from Vladimir Putin, who was elected to a third new term as Russia's president two weeks later.

Judge Marina Syrova said in her verdict that the three band members "committed hooliganism driven by religious hatred" and offended religious believers. She rejected the women's arguments that they were protesting the Orthodox Church's support for Putin and didn't want to hurt the feelings of believers.

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alekhina, and Yekaterina Samutsevich stood in handcuffs in a glass cage in the courtroom for three hours as the judge read the verdict. They smiled sadly at the testimony of prosecution witnesses accusing them of sacrilege and "devilish dances" in church.

The three women remained calm after the judge announced the sentence. Someone in the courtroom shouted "Shame!"

The charges carried the maximum penalty of seven years in prison, although prosecutors had asked for a three-year sentence.
Putin himself had said the band members shouldn't be judged too harshly, drawing expectations that the band members could be sentenced to the time they already have spent in custody and freed in courtroom. Skeptics had warned, however, that a mild sentence would look as if Putin was bowing to public pressure — something he has clearly resented throughout his 12-year rule.

On the street outside, the courtroom, police rounded up a few dozen protesters, including former world chess champion Garry Kasparov, who is a leading opposition activist, and leftist opposition group leader Sergei Udaltsov.

Amnesty International strongly condemned the court's ruling, calling it a "bitter blow" for freedom of expression in Russia.

The Pussy Riot case already has inflicted bruising damage to Russia's esteem overseas and stoked the resentment of opposition partisans who have turned out in a series of massive rallies since last winter.

It also has underlined the vast influence of the Russian Orthodox Church. Although church and state are formally separate, the church identifies itself as the heart of Russian national identity and critics say its strength effectively makes it a quasi-state entity. Some Orthodox groups and many believers had urged strong punishment for an action they consider blasphemous.

The head of the church, Patriarch Kirill, has made no secret of his strong support for Putin, even praising his presidential terms as "God's miracle" and has described the performance as part of an assault by "enemy forces" on the church.

Kirill avoided talking to the media as he was leaving Warsaw's Royal Castle following a ceremony in which he and the head of Poland's Catholic Church called for mutual forgiveness and reconciliation. Microphones were set up for statements in the castle yard and reporters were brought to the site, but Kirill went straight to his car.

Celebrities including Paul McCartney, Madonna and Bjork have called for the band members to be freed, and other protests timed to just before the verdict or soon afterward were being. In the Russian capital activists put the band's trademark ski masks, or balaclavas, on several statues across town.

Small, but raucous protests were held in a few dozen cities. A few dozen people came out in Barcelona, Spain, a couple hundred in Paris, and a handful in Washington.

"This is all nonsense," said Boris Akunin, one of Russia's
best known authors. "I can't believe that in the 21st century a judge in a secular court is talking about devilish movements. I can't believe that a government official is quoting medieval church councils."

Before Friday's proceedings began, defense lawyer Nikolai Polozov said the women "hope for an acquittal but they are ready to continue to fight."

The case comes in the wake of several recently passed laws cracking down on opposition, including one that raised the fine for taking part in an unauthorized demonstrations by 150 times to 300,000 rubles (about $9,000).

Another measure requires non-government organizations that both engage in vaguely defined political activity and receive funding from abroad to register as "foreign agents."
Link
 

Konstantin K

Big League Poster
Aug 25, 2010
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#16
'Free Pussy Riot' scrawled 'in blood' above murdered Russian women

The bodies of two women have been found beneath a message calling for the release of jailed members of the punk band Pussy Riot, Russian investigators have said.

The deaths have prompted anger among Kremlin supporters, who have warned that the musicians were encouraging dangerous radicalism. But supporters of the band, three of whose members were given prison sentences earlier this month, immediately cast doubt on claims that the murders were the work of a Pussy Riot fan.

One Russian investigator cautioned that the killer was possibly trying to mislead police by drawing attention to supporters of the punk provocateurs.

Investigators said the two victims – a 76-year-old and a 38-year-old woman – were killed in the city of Kazan at the weekend.

More
 
#17
Their method was stupid...even though as fans of the radio show that pulled "Sex for Sam" we shouldn't be indignant about it...

However their message is important. A lot of corruption in Russia with the government and orthodox church. Just like every fucking religion that gets a say in the political arena.
 
Jan 25, 2006
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#18
I feel like the NSFW link with the hot topless blonde with a chainsaw should've got more wackbag love.
You all love hot girls with guns, not chainsaws?

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova isn't bad looking...


No idea who these people are, but I'll have to investigate.
 
Dec 8, 2004
49,333
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Maine
#19
Aww they don't want to be sent to a Gulag... ummm penal colony...

Pussy Riot Fear for Their Lives, Ask to Serve Sentence in Moscow

The Russian punk group jailed for two years for performing an anti-Putin prayer wants the authorities to cancel a planned transfer to a remote penal colony. Anna Nemtsova on the dangers—and why their appeal will probably fail.

The three members of Pussy Riot sentenced to two years in prison in a trial that attracted worldwide attention are asking the warden of their pretrial detention center to let them serve out their time in Moscow instead of at a remote penal colony hundreds of miles away.

More than 2,000 prisoners have died in or en route to Russian prisons in just the last six months, according to Russia’s prosecutor general. And the young women’s lawyers, who do not expect an Oct. 1 appeal of their August sentence for hooliganism to be successful, have received threatening messages from prison employees.

“We have been promised that the colonies ‘would be prepared’ to receive our clients. There is only one reading of it: their lives are in danger,” Violetta Volkova, a lawyer for the group, said in a phone interview Tuesday morning from Washington, D.C., where she was preparing to receive a John Lennon award on behalf of Pussy Riot from Yoko Ono.

Volkova said she was afraid that anything, “from **** to murder,” could transpire in the remote women’s prisons. The transportation stage from Moscow to a penal colony, known as the “etap” and filled with its own hazing rituals, is what rights defenders fear most. Twenty or more prisoners are packed into train compartments meant for four people, and such trips can last several days.

“The train stops at every jail along the way. The most violence takes place on the train and during the transit stops,” said Lev Ponamaryov, the leader of the For Human Rights movement, which monitors violations in Russian prisons.

Despite the dangers, Russian dissidents with prison experience going back to the gulag say Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, 22, Maria Alyokhina, 24, and Yekaterina Samutsevich, 29, should not have asked for favors from the system. “Don’t believe them, don’t fear them, don’t ask anything of them”—the three rules made famous among Soviet prisoners by Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s literature—remain true today, said Alexander Podrabinek.



Members of the punk band Pussy Riot, from left, Maria Alyokhina, Yekaterina Samutsevich, and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova sit in a glass-walled cage during a court hearing in Moscow, Aug. 17, 2012. (Natalia Kolesnikova, AFP / Getty Images)

A former political prisoner, Podrabinek served his five years in a Siberian gulag in the 1980s. The prison, he said, “turns its back for good” on those who cooperate with prison administrators or seek favors, and this tradition will never change. “The entire prison will defeat the girls if they make deals with the Moscow jail even once,” he said. “The prison’s telegraph will immediately send the news around to all the Russian jails.”

Going to a distant prison might not be that bad, he added. “For now, a majority of the prisoners, who are always well informed, respect Pussy Riot for their courage, so the girls shouldn’t ruin their reputation.”

“Whether they stay in a Moscow jail or serve their term in one of the colonies, they will be under constant pressure to reveal the names of the other Pussy Riot members.”

Pussy Riot, who dared to sing an anti-Putin song in Red Square and then twice at Moscow churches, have indeed grown famous for their fearless spirit. Their
“We are stronger than the state” statements from prison encouraged dozens of their fans to don short dresses, colorful tights, and balaclavas, and come out to public protests demanding freedom for the women. Well-articulated and balanced speeches by all three band members in court also made an impression on the Russian opposition, who praised them as future politicians. Pale and exhausted after a six-month investigation and a show trial, all three laughed when their sentence was read out in a Moscow court last month.

Yet their biggest challenge is ahead. “Whether they stay in a Moscow jail or serve their term in one of the colonies, they will be under constant pressure to reveal the names of the other Pussy Riot members,” said Alla Pokras, the head of Penal Reform International. Russian law enforcement is seeking the rest of the group, and two members have already fled the country.

Knowing how brave and stubborn the three jailed women are, however, the prison has no reason to count on their cooperation and therefore will likely refuse to let them stay in Moscow. Those who have lived under life-threatening pressure in prison understand Pussy Riot’s efforts to remain in the city. In March, the head of the Russia Behind Bars movement of prisoners’ relatives, Olga Romanova, received a message that her husband, the entrepreneur Alexei Kozlov, would be murdered as soon as he arrived in prison.

“When your client or loved one is facing death, you have to take every little opportunity to protect them,” Romanova said. She and her husband also asked the prison authorities to allow Kozlov to serve out his term in Moscow, under the close eye of human-rights activists, to no avail. “The prison authorities do not like those who cannot be forced to compromise,” she said.

Not that Pussy Riot asked for any easy life. Zoya Svetova, who visited them in jail a week ago with a public observers’ commission, said being locked up in the women’s ward of the Moscow jail is a hard-working, humiliating life. “If the country’s leaders decide to keep the women in Moscow, their job will be cleaning toilets, cooking, and serving other prisoners,” she said.

At least Tolokonnikova’s 4-year-old daughter and Alyokhina’s 6-year-old son would not have to travel for days by train to see their mothers but could visit them at the familiar Moscow No. 6 pretrial detention center, known as the Yellow Bastille.
Link
 

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
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#20
Holy shit, a search engine that actually works.

MOSCOW (AP) — A Moscow appeals court on Wednesday unexpectedly freed one of the jailed Pussy Riot members, but upheld the two-year prison sentence for the two others jailed for an irreverent protest against President Vladimir Putin.
All three women were convicted in August of hooliganism motivated by religious hatred. They argued in court on Wednesday that their impromptu performance inside Moscow's main cathedral in February was political in nature and not an attack on religion.
The Moscow City Court ruled that Yekaterina Samutsevich's sentence should be suspended because she was thrown out of the cathedral by guards before she could remove her guitar from its case and take part in the performance.
"The punishment for an incomplete crime is much lighter than for a completed one," said Samutsevich's lawyer, Irina Khrunova. "She did not participate in the actions the court found constituted hooliganism."
Dressed in neon-colored miniskirts and tights, with homemade balaclavas on their heads, the women performed a "punk prayer" asking Virgin Mary to save Russia from Putin as he headed into a March election that would hand him a third term.
"If we unintentionally offended any believers with our actions, we express our apologies," said Samutsevich, who along with Maria Alekhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova spoke in court from inside a glass cage known colloquially as the "aquarium."
"The idea of the protest was political, not religious," she said. "In this and in previous protests we acted against the current government of the president, and against the Russian Orthodox Church as an institution of the Russian government, against the political comments of the Russian patriarch. Exactly because of this I don't consider that I committed a crime."
The case has been condemned in the U.S. and Europe, where it has been seen as an illustration of Putin's intensifying crackdown on dissent after his return to the presidency after four years as prime minister.
Putin, however, recently said two-year sentence was justified because "It is impermissible to undermine our moral foundations, moral values, to try to destroy the country."
The appeal was postponed from Oct. 1 after Samutsevich fired her lawyers. Prosecutors criticized the move as a delaying tactic.
Her father, Stanislav Samutsevich, attributed his daughter's release mostly to the change in lawyers. He said he was deeply sorry for the two others, who are expected to be sent to a prison colony to serve out their sentences.
Defense lawyers said Putin's remarks amounted to pressure on the appeals court. "I want a ruling on President Putin on the inadmissibility of his meddling in a court decision," defense lawyer Mark Feigin said.
The Russian Orthodox Church had said the appeals court should show leniency if the three women repented. But the defendants said Wednesday that they could not repent because they harbored no religious hatred and had committed no crime. Their protest, they said, was against Putin and the church hierarchy for openly supporting his rule.
Patriarch Kirill has expressed strong support for Putin, praising his leadership as "God's miracle." He described the punk performance as part of an assault by "enemy forces" on the church.
The judge repeatedly interrupted the defendants when their statements turned to politics, but they persisted in speaking their minds.
"We will not be silent. And even if we are in Mordovia or Siberia (where prisoners in Russia are often sent to serve out their terms) we won't be silent," Alekhina said.
A lawyer representing cathedral staff, Alexei Taratukhin, said the verdict should be upheld because the women's actions "had nothing to do with politics, democracy or freedom."
Tolokonnikova appealed to Russians for understanding.
"I don't consider myself guilty. But again I ask all those who are listening to me for the last time: I don't want people to be angry at me: Yes, I'm going to prison, but I don't want anyone to think that there is any hatred in me."
Defense lawyers asked the court to take into consideration that Tolokonnikova and Alekhin both have a young child.
The Moscow City Court began Wednesday's hearing by dismissing two defense motions, including one to call more witnesses to the performance inside Christ the Savior Cathedral.
 

Mags

LDAR, bitch.
Donator
Oct 22, 2004
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Ill Repute
#21
The Asian twat here on FOX5-NY refused to say the name Pussy Riot. She kept saying it was vulgar and had an angry look on her face. Not sure if it was her or the faggot network's decision. She made a huge deal out of not saying it which of course draws more attention to it.
If the name was "Pussy Willow" wouldja have a problem with it, stupid?
I hate self-righteous local news readers.

Meanwhile, Erin Burnette on CNN just mentioned it in passing and it wasn't shocking or vulgar.
 
Dec 8, 2004
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Maine
#22
***Follow Up***

Pussy Riot member on hunger strike moved to hospital




Maria Alyokhina was refused the right to attend her own parole hearing
A member of the Russian punk band Pussy Riot who went on hunger strike in jail last week has been taken to hospital.

Maria Alyokhina was moved to a hospital in her prison colony in the Urals town of Berezniki, the husband of one of her bandmates told the Associated Press.

Alyokhina began her protest after being barred from attending a parole hearing.

She and two other members of the Pussy Riot group were jailed after staging an anti-Vladimir Putin protest in a Moscow cathedral in February 2012.

One, Yekaterina Samutsevich, had her sentence suspended on appeal last October. Another, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, was denied parole last month.

In a letter published by her lawyers earlier this week, Alyokhina claimed prison officials were attempting to turn fellow inmates against her by holding a security crackdown in advance of the parole hearing.

Alyokhina previously spent five months in solitary confinement after claiming that officials deliberately lodged her with hardened criminals and encouraged them to intimidate her.

The Pussy Riot trio were jailed for two years last August after being convicted of a breach of public order motivated by religious hatred.

The prosecution prompted worldwide condemnation, with Sir Paul McCartney among those calling for the band members to be freed.
Link
 

MalcomOopsGotShot

White House Spokesperson
May 23, 2013
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FBI Surveillance Van down the street
#24
http://takimag.com/article/when_pussies_riot_jim_goad/print#axzz2UbGL5D3g

When Pussies Riot

A Russian judge is expected to deliver a verdict on Friday in the highly publicized show trial of three members of Pussy Riot, who’ve already won a cultural war of sorts by forcing broadcasters across the globe to say the word “pussy” on TV. The trio of young, unscrubbed radical lasses—Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alekhina, and Yekaterina Samutsevich—are accused of “hooliganism” and “inciting religious hatred” for storming the altar at Moscow’s Christ the Savior Cathedral in February wearing Day-Glo balaclavas, fist-pumping and high-kicking as they performed a “punk prayer” that urged the Virgin Mary to become a feminist and help them drive Vladimir Putin from power.

Arrested in March, they’ve already spent five months behind bars. They initially faced a maximum of seven years in prison, although the prosecutor is pushing for a three-year sentence.

With a clipped, maniacal performance that by most accounts lasted less than a minute before security guards intervened, Pussy Riot has managed to split Russia in two. The trial pits patriarchy v. matriarchy, religion v. secularism, nationalists v. globalists, urban intelligentsia v. rural traditionalists, and Putin’s supporters against his already rabid detractors. It has also pried open a rusty can of worms by spurring an international debate over what exactly is sacred and what is profane.

A loosely aggregated art “collective,” Pussy Riot formed in the fall of last year in protest of what appeared to be Vladimir Putin’s inevitable return to Russia’s presidency. The three Pussies on trial—all of whom are described as middle-class and well-educated—had previously belonged to a self-described “terrorist” performance-art group called Voina (War), whose feats included painting a giant penis on a St. Petersburg bridge, shoving a raw chicken inside a human vagina at a supermarket, and having live group sex at an art museum. Nadezhda Tolokonnikova participated in the latter event while nine months pregnant and reportedly gave birth four days later.

Since it’s cool to bash Russia now that it’s no longer communist, and it’s A-OK to incite hatred so long as it’s against pale Christians, Pussy Riot has garnered massive support amid ideologically bedraggled Westerners who value indefinable deconstructivist constructs such as “raising awareness and solidarity and getting people involved” and those who’ve been waiting 35 years to see “punk rock [have] a future as a global force for justice and freedom.” Yoko Ono, Sting, Peter Gabriel, and the Red Hot Chili Peppers have demanded that Putin FREE PUSSY RIOT immediately. At a Moscow concert last week, Madonna temporarily put down her sweaty boob-cones and delivered an impassioned speech on Pussy Riot’s behalf, prompting Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin to inaccurately call her an “ex-wh*re” on Twitter. (Consensus is that Madonna’s still a wh*re.)

Support has apparently been scant from mainstream Russian musicians, and large swaths of the Russian heartland seem convinced that Pussy Riot are useful idiots being used by Western powers who are unhappy that Putin was reelected by what even the election-monitoring group Golos admits was a majority quotient in a crowded field. Still, a recent poll indicated that most Russians feel imprisoning Pussy Riot would be an overreaction.

Upon their arrest, two members initially denied participating in the “action” at the cathedral but now seem to take pride in their involvement. In a prepared statement at trial, Tolokonnikova said, “we had no idea that the punk performance could hurt or offend someone” and that there was “no hate, not a drop” in what they’d done. But she conceded they’d made an “ethical mistake” in choosing to stomp around in the cathedral rather than a more neutral venue.
And this is where I agree. Not only did Pussy Riot make a mistake in storming the cathedral, Putin’s regime made a mistake in charging them with an anti-religious hate crime. If there’s any crime here, it’s something simple such as trespassing. What they did was rude. I’m sure they wouldn’t like it if a gaggle of Russian Orthodox greybeards crashed one of their pajama parties and started calling them a bunch of filthy whores. Or maybe they would. These chicks are weird.


Feminism has been called “the radical notion that women are human beings,” but in its latter-day extremist incarnations it more resembles the religious fiction that women are innocent angels. It’s notable that Pussy Riot beseeched the Virgin Mary—a matriarch if ever there was one—to help them shame the patriarch of the Russian Orthodox church for his political endorsement of thehyper-macho Putin, a martial-arts expert who rides motorcycles, race cars, military fighter jets, and submarines when he isn’t scuba-diving, playing ice hockey, or shooting darts at whales.

Punk rock, at least in its original manifestations, seemed innately nihilistic and iconoclastic before it morphed and ultimately ossified into a blind puppet of Cultural Marxist platitudes and began propping up everything once deemed profane (heroin addiction, slovenliness, foul language, and, um, “alternative sexuality”) as almost saintly virtues. Over the years, the slogan “Sid Vicious Died for Your Sins” seems less and less ironic. Without seeing a particle of irony, many of Pussy Riot’s supporters are calling their prosecution “outrageous,” “offensive,” and even “blasphemous.” One British scribe went so far as to claim that “a pussy riot is an absolute moral necessity.”

Predictably, neither side wants to be guilty of “hate” in all this, to which I say, “Poppycock, balderdash, and fiddlesticks!” Everyone hates, whether they admit it or not. It’s time to decriminalize and demystify what is a natural and universal human emotion. There’s nothing wrong with hating anything that threatens your well-being and sense of self.

I see both sides’ fevered hatred as a response to disillusionment and a sort of primal panic at having no tangible solutions. After the unparalleled mind-crushing totalitarianism of the Soviets, many Russians feel their government has betrayed them yet again. Beneath the superficial sparring about who’s holy and who’s a sinner is a frantic power struggle over how society should be managed.

But I’ve never been to Russia, so I asked a friend in Moscow for his thoughts. He says the public now generally sees Putin as a king rather than a president and that the country is slipping back into feudalism. He says no one under seventy years old wants a return to communism but that many people are uncomfortable with what appears to be an emerging fusion of church and state. He says that most women support Pussy Riot but most men don’t, claiming that his wisest male friend has scrutinized all the information and concluded that the group is being used as tools for Western globalist forces that are hostile to Russian nationalism.

He agrees with me that most revolutionaries are fantastic at destroying things but haven’t a clue as to how they’d rebuild them.

Still, he insists that the people want change, and in Russia change never comes without violence.

“All the people here have no hope,” he says, “but still they vote for power. In Russia, we have a proverb: You can’t understand Russia with your mind, you can only believe in it. It’s so huge that people get lost, it is fucking wide and so different and so empty. It is like the universe and if you want to manage it, you need to be a fucking sadist.”

So when change comes, it likely won’t be the answer, but at least it will be an answer.
 

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
79,051
27,618
898
Seattle
#25
Putin getting a laugh out of these protesters

(and fat hag Merkel looking terrified as if she's about to go into cardiac arrest)

Hell, Putin likes boobies too. He's all man. He just also happens to be a scumbag.