Red Sox not going to Japan?

Perch1019

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Oct 4, 2004
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#1
From ESPN.com

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3301195

The Boston Red Sox are threatening to boycott their season-opening games in Japan unless their coaches and other staff are paid for making the trip.

Mike Lowell has told The Boston Globe the team voted unanimously not to take the field for their final spring training game or to board the plane later Wednesday for Japan.

Manager Terry Francona and his players were upset after learning staff members are not going to get a $40,000 stipend. The Boston Herald reported players insisted part of their agreement to make the trip included the fee -- for them and the coaches.

"I did not have an off day yesterday. I had the phone glued to my ear because I was promised some answers and I haven't even received a phone call," Francona said Wednesday. "So I'm a little bit stuck. What I want to do this morning is get excited to play a baseball game and what I ended up doing is apologizing to the coaches and being humiliated."

The World Series champions are scheduled to begin their season against Oakland on March 25 and 26.

The Red Sox clubhouse was closed to reporters because of the dispute and the team had not taken the field for batting practice before its last scheduled spring training game in Florida against Toronto.

"We had an agreement," Curt Schilling, one of a handful of Red Sox players who talked with Major League Baseball on ground rules for the trip, told ESPN's Claire Smith.

"Some of the promises have already been taken away, now this," Schilling said. "As far as the players are concerned, [withholding the coaches' bonuses] can't happen."

''When we voted to go to Japan, that was not a unanimous vote,'' Lowell told the Globe, "but we did what our team wanted us to do for Major League Baseball. They promised us the moon and the stars, and then when we committed, they started pulling back. It's not just the coaches, it's the staff, the trainers, a lot of people are affected by this.

"I'm so super proud of this team," Lowell said, according to the Globe. "When we put it to a vote it was unanimous, we're all in agreement that we're not going to put up with this.''

That the players would consider such action "is really appreciated, to say the least," Red Sox hitting coach Dave Magadan told Smith. "It means as much as the money itself.

"While we're very fortunate, a lot of people don't realize what we do. It's nice to get recognition from the players."
 

Jimmy's Dignity

Pound my bloody fudge!!
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May 27, 2005
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#2
I'm actually with them on this one...you aren't paying our managers, fuck you we're not going
 

LilJimmyRbinson

Best muppet ever
Nov 19, 2004
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#3
So MLB is holding back money they agreed to when they signed the deal for the Japan series? Or is it the Sox owner who's not paying.

Either way it's kinda shitty, but on the other hand, I'm not going to feel bad because these guys didn't get their $40,000 stipend.

I hope the Sox go and it fucks them up for 2 months like the Yankees in 04.
 

domelogic

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Feb 16, 2005
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#4
mlb saw disaster on their hands and came to an agreement with the redsox. an agreement that must mean they are going to pay the managers.

seems kinda of dumb for baseball to pay the players to go over their but not the staff. its not like there isnt enough money to go around fucking cheapos
 

ginaf20697

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Jul 26, 2005
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#5
God help me I agree too. It's nice that they are looking after the staff who DOESN'T make the mondo bucks that they do.
 
Jun 30, 2005
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#7
the fucked up thing is they go over there...play 2 exhibition games, 2 regular season games, and then come back to California and play MORE EXHIBITION GAMES...after the season starts...fuck that...they should boycott those games, or start NO ONE of any relevance.
 

Stormrider666

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Mar 19, 2005
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#8
the fucked up thing is they go over there...play 2 exhibition games, 2 regular season games, and then come back to California and play MORE EXHIBITION GAMES...after the season starts...fuck that...they should boycott those games, or start NO ONE of any relevance.
The Yankees had to do the same thing back in 2004. The two more exhibition games when they return, is still part of spring training if I'm not mistaken. The Red Sox are actually getting the better end of deal this time. They will start the season on the west coast and work their way back east.
 

counterpunch

must not sleep / must warn others
Jun 25, 2006
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#9
http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3301195

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- The Boston Red Sox ended a threatened boycott Wednesday of their final spring training game in Florida, resolving a dispute over paying coaches for the season-opening trip to Japan.

The televised game against Toronto started an hour late when players voted unanimously not to play the exhibition or to board Wednesday's scheduled flight to Tokyo for the two-game series against Oakland on March 25 and 26.

Boston players insisted their coaches receive $40,000 appearance fees for the Japan trip, matching the deal negotiated for players by their union. After a few hours of talks among players from the Red Sox and Athletics, Major League Baseball, the clubs and the players' association, the sides said the dispute had been resolved.

"We felt we had to make a stand, and being on ESPN didn't hurt," Red Sox third baseman Mike Lowell said.

Major League Baseball agreed to pay the managers, coaches and trainers on the trip $20,000 each from management's proceeds, a person familiar with the agreement said, speaking on condition of anonymity because details weren't announced. The Red Sox agreed to make up the difference to make the amount equal, and to pay some of the other team personnel making the trip, the person said.

"The players just stepped up and they did what I think was right," Boston bench coach Brad Mills said.

It had not yet between determined whether Oakland would make additional payments to its staff.

"Everyone connected with the trip will be fairly compensated," baseball spokesman Rich Levin said.

Manager Terry Francona and his players were upset after learning staff members were not going to get the $40,000 stipend. The Boston Herald reported players insisted part of their agreement to make the trip included the fee -- for them and the coaches.

"We're so united. And I don't mean just the players," Francona said in a dugout interview with ESPN during Wednesday's game. "I mean the staff, the trainers and our players showed that and that's what this was about. It wasn't about being greedy. It was about trying to be unified."

Managers and coaches were included in the players' pool payments for baseball's two previous opening trips to Japan -- the New York Mets played the Chicago Cubs in 2000 and the Yankees played Tampa Bay in 2004. But there was no such provision this time in the agreement between MLB and the players' association.

In Phoenix, A's players watched coverage of Boston's dispute on television, called a team meeting and didn't take batting practice before their game against a Los Angeles Angels split squad.

A's player representative Huston Street emerged from the meeting and said the exhibition game would be played and Oakland players would make the trip.

"You have to stay firm in your belief, and I believe we've done that. Results have happened. That's why we're taking the field now. We wouldn't be taking the field now if we didn't firmly believe that the right thing was going to get done," he said. "The right thing is going to get done. We're going to play in Japan, and it's going to be an incredible series that everybody has been looking forward to."

A Boston player contacted Oakland pitcher Alan Embree on Wednesday morning.

"For those guys to take that stance -- they're veterans. They feel strongly about it, and they brought it to the attention of higher-ups," Embree said. "We have to fix it one way or the other. … Coaches deserved compensation. They're going over there, too, and every little bit counts."

Lowell said $20,000 payments for the coaches would not have been acceptable given that the players were making $40,000.

"We didn't think that was correct," he said. "Giving them half of that is not equal."

Daisuke Matsuzaka, who had been scheduled to pitch for Boston, left the stadium to pitch at a game against Minnesota's Triple-A affiliate. David Aardsma started in his place. Matsuzaka is scheduled to be the Opening Day starter in Tokyo next week against Oakland.

Francona spoke twice Wednesday with commissioner Bud Selig about the exhibition against the Blue Jays. Toronto won 4-3 before a crowd of 7,868.

"Mr. Selig was justifiably concerned about playing the game, which I completely understand," Francona said.

Boston's Kevin Youkilis stressed the players felt strongly about not going to Japan without a resolution.

"The club's working on stuff and trying to get money where it needs to get," he said. "It was definitely an experience of a lifetime, and it ended in a good way."

Varitek said players thought it was necessary to take a stand on behalf of the coaches and staff.

"They're the basis of what takes care of us," he said.

Before the game, the Red Sox clubhouse was closed to reporters because of the bonus dispute.

"We had an agreement," Curt Schilling, one of a handful of Red Sox players who talked with Major League Baseball on ground rules for the trip, told ESPN's Claire Smith.

"Some of the promises have already been taken away, now this," Schilling said. "As far as the players are concerned, [withholding the coaches' bonuses] can't happen."

''When we voted to go to Japan, that was not a unanimous vote,'' Lowell told The Boston Globe, "but we did what our team wanted us to do for Major League Baseball. They promised us the moon and the stars, and then when we committed, they started pulling back. It's not just the coaches, it's the staff, the trainers, a lot of people are affected by this.

"I'm so super proud of this team," Lowell said, according to The Globe. "When we put it to a vote it was unanimous. We're all in agreement that we're not going to put up with this.''

That the players would consider such action "is really appreciated, to say the least," Red Sox hitting coach Dave Magadan told ESPN. "It means as much as the money itself.

"While we're very fortunate, a lot of people don't realize what we do. It's nice to get recognition from the players."

Oakland general manager Billy Beane was happy the trip will go on and expressed desire for additional international play.

"I hope we go to Rome. I hope we go to Paris, Berlin," Beane said, wearing shorts with a logo of the English soccer team Arsenal.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
 

Salem

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Jul 3, 2006
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#10
I wonder if the As have /had the same problem. I was against it when the Yanks went and Im against it now. The japs wanna see it? Have them come here and spend thier yen here in the states to see the American game. We dont need to go there. Or we can send our AAA teams there. They can see our burnt out our rehabbing players that way.
 

Melk

Listening from the Future
Nov 14, 2005
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#11
The japs wanna see it? Have them come here and spend thier yen here in the states to see the American game. We dont need to go there. Or we can send our AAA teams there. They can see our burnt out our rehabbing players that way.
As much as I find the Japanese interest in Major League Baseball annoying, Japan is the only market where the MLB's fanbase is growing. The MLB would be completely stupid to not exploit this situation. They can sell expensive TV broadcasting contracts to TV stations who will only show a small cross-section of games and they will have exhibition games where tickets sell at a price-point starting at 60 US dollars. They can sell replica uniforms for 4 times what the Red Sox could get in their home stadium.

From a player or manager perspective, their performance in Japan can make an individual player marketable outside of their talent level.

Brian Buchanan, Adam Riggs, Alex Cabrera, Tom Davey, Lance Carter, Tuffy Rhodes, Ryan Vogelsong, and Scott Atchison (to name a few) have been able to carve out successful careers outside of the Majors (or at least extend their earning potential an extra couple of years) by moving to Japan.

One exhibition at-bat could create a sort of sports media rivalry between a Japanese Pro Baseball player and a Major Leaguer. That one As or Red Sox player could be a bench warmer in the US but then immediately become a prospect in the NPB. This could be beneficial to all the parties involved.

It is really easy to say, "Let the Japs come here if they want to watch baseball" but would you want to watch the Super Bowl shown edited and on tape delay if it was played overseas? Probably not. Do you think the Japanese people would want to watch an exhibition game on tape delay? Do you think the Japanese would be interested in watching an opening day game if they had to travel 16 hours to Boston to see it?

The MLB should pay all of the team staff what they promised them. However assuming that being in Japan for a week is "bad" for the Red Sox difficult for me to comprehend. Jet lag is the only real downside.
 

Stormrider666

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Mar 19, 2005
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#12
I just love how over the past few days, I have heard people on ESPN bitching and moaning about the fact that the Red Sox had to Japan in the first place. Funny I didn't hear all this outrage when the Yankees and the Devil Rays had to do it 4 years ago.