Romney was at 60's era draft protest at Stanford University

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It's ok, he was on the right side...

:trollol:

Preppy protester: The moment a 19-year-old Mitt Romney demonstrated in favour of Vietnam War draft

Teenage Romney takes unpopular stance in favour of south-east Asian war

By GRAHAM SMITH
Last updated at 1:06 PM on 6th January 2012

They say every picture tells a story.

A newly-unearthed photograph showing Mitt Romney demonstrating in favour of the Vietnam War draft might leave the presidential candidate feeling somewhat embarrassed.

The veteran Republican, then 19, can be seen picketing an anti-war sit-in at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, in 1966.

Mr Romney will no doubt be proud of his younger self taking what was at the time a very unpopular stance.

However, he might grimace at his clean-cut appearance and preppy wardrobe.


Taking a stand: A young Mitt Romney holds up a placard at a pro-draft demonstration at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, in May 1966


Fortunate son: Mr Romney's status as a 'Mormon missionary' meant he was exempt from the Vietnam War draft

Taken at the height of the swinging Sixties, Mr Romney holds a sign declaring 'Speak Out, Don't Sit In' as, alongside like-minded individuals, he proclaims his support for Lyndon Johnson's ever-expanding draft.

But, in a marked contrast to the relaxed dress sense associated with that decade's youth movement, he is wearing smart white slacks, a white buttoned-up shirt and a dark blazer.

A newspaper clipping headlined 'Governor's son pickets the pickets' states: 'Mitt Romney, son of Michigan Gov. George Romney, was one of the pickets who supported the Stanford University administration in opposition to sit-in demonstrators.'

The photograph was taken on May 20, 1966, shortly after a group of students had taken over the office of Stanford University President Wallace Sterling.

They were protesting at the introduction of a test designed to help the authorities decide who was eligible for the draft.

Mr Romney was one of approximately 150 conservative students who counter-picketed the sit-in.

Carey Coulter was one of the demonstrators alongside Mr Romney that day. He told BuzzFeed.com: 'We were there to get an education and these people holding the administration hostage was antithetical to that.

'Mitt walked up to me and said that he had some experience with the press, and that he would handle the press for me if I wanted him to. I said fine, because I was busy running the demonstration.

'I don't recall ever seeing him again.'

The press experience to which Mr Romney referred no doubt came from witnessing how his father, George, dealt with the media.

George Romney headed American Motors before becoming Michigan governor in 1963, a position he held for six years before being appointed Secretary of Housing and Urban Development by Richard Nixon.


Handling the press: A newspaper cutting records the moment the future presidential candidate made his mark

Ironically, he later had a change of heart and turned against the Vietnam War.

His pro-war son, meanwhile, never served in south-east Asia because his status as a Mormon missionary exempted him from the draft.

The GOP hopeful spent just one year at Stanford before heading to France for 30 months of missionary work.

He had already met his future wife Ann in 1965 when he was 18 and she was 15. The couple married in 1969 and have five sons and 16 grandchildren.

Mr Romney went on to earn millions as a business consultant and venture capitalist.

After co-founding private equity firm Bain Capital in the late 1970s, he helped launch the Staples office supply chain, as well as buy Domino's Pizza.

His public career began in 1999, when he was recruited to take over the 2002 Winter Olympics after scandal and financial deficits threatened the Salt Lake City games.

In 2003, he took over as governor of Massachusetts after a campaign in which he cast himself as a moderate on abortion, gay rights and stem cell research.

He had sounded many of the same themes during an unsuccessful 1994 U.S. Senate race against Democrat Edward M Kennedy.

He chose not to seek a second term and instead turned his sights to the White House.


Americans United for Change, a liberal group, last month used this 1980s photograph of Mitt Romney (centre) and his Bain Capital colleagues to compare him to Wall Street movie villain Gordon Gekko

He lost the 2008 GOP nomination to John McCain and has been plotting his latest presidential nomination ever since.

But a record of changing positions on social issues including abortion and gay rights has left many conservatives questioning his sincerity.

Mr Romney oversaw a health care law enacted in Massachusetts that is similar to Barack Obama's national health overhaul, which conservatives despise.

He has also struggled to allay some sceptics of his Mormon faith.

His extreme wealth - the Romneys are believed to be worth between $190million and $264million - allowed him to invest more than $40million of his own money in the 2008 race.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...d-favour-Vietnam-War-draft.html#ixzz1j5pP2Tfq
 

OccupyWackbag

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Anyone, Democrat or Republican, gets a mulligan from me for any dumb shit they did before the age of 25. We were all idiots at that time in our life.
 

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So he wasn't eligible for the draft because he was listed as a Mormon Missionary......typical. They should send the Mormons in first. They can annoy the enemy to death in their white shirts and black plants wanting to talk about a horse thief that started a cult.
 

Josh_R

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What a piece of shit. Collect you draft exemption and then picket against others who are not as fortunate. Fuck him.


His pro-war son, meanwhile, never served in south-east Asia because his status as a Mormon missionary exempted him from the draft.
 

Motor Head

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Anyone, Democrat or Republican, gets a mulligan from me for any dumb shit they did before the age of 25. We were all idiots at that time in our life.
Yeah, as long as they weren't apart of some radical type of group - you know, blowing shit up, or where killing police officers is deemed acceptable.
 

jimmyslostchin

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Anyone, Democrat or Republican, gets a mulligan from me for any dumb shit they did before the age of 25. We were all idiots at that time in our life.
Fucking this. I have an acquaintance from the army who seems to have made it his personal duty to make sure people know Ted Nugent was a draft dodger. Once I hit 30 and started looking back on my early 20's, I started giving people a pass for stupid shit they did as kids.
 

Lord Zero

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I don't trust anyone in this country who supports or supported a draft.
 

BloodyDiaper

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To be fair to Mitt Romney, even if he hadn't received a deferment for being a Mormon missionary he probably would have got one for being the son of a millionaire governor.
 

Lord Zero

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To be fair to Mitt Romney, even if he hadn't received a deferment for being a Mormon missionary he probably would have got one for being the son of a millionaire governor.
Even if he had gotten drafted, he probably would not have seen combat. He most likely would've been assigned to a desk.
 

Josh_R

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Stormrider666

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I don't trust anyone in this country who supports or supported a draft.
I agree; I don't give "draft dodgers" shit like I used to when I was a kid. They might have been hippie douche bags, but they were right.

Also, I never trust a man who has never drank a beer.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2064518/Mitt-Romney-tasted-beer-tried-cigarette-once.html
I hate to say it. But if I had been around in the late 1960s', I would have been a draft dodger as well.
 

Neon

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I was born in a country with a mandatory draft, so I recuse myself from this debate. Drafts are a natural thing for me, and I was drafted, as was pretty much everyone I know there...
 

Lord Zero

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I was born in a country with a mandatory draft, so I recuse myself from this debate. Drafts are a natural thing for me, and I was drafted, as was pretty much everyone I know there...
I don't believe in drafts but I understand that it's a little different when you're Israel's size and in Israel's difficult geographic and sociopolitical position.
 

Neon

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I don't believe in drafts but it's a little different when you're Israel's size and in Israel's difficult geographic and sociopolitical position.
That's true, but countries like Greece also have a draft, and they don't have the same type of problem. I meant more in a psychological/conceptual sense. If the US suddenly found itself in a full scale war with China or Russia and you asked me if I thought there should be a draft, I would say "Fuck yes." Should it have been done for Vietnam? Fuck if I know...
 

Stormrider666

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That's true, but countries like Greece also have a draft, and they don't have the same type of problem. I meant more in a psychological/conceptual sense. If the US suddenly found itself in a full scale war with China or Russia and you asked me if I thought there should be a draft, I would say "Fuck yes." Should it have been done for Vietnam? Fuck if I know...
To answer your question about, No.
 

Neon

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To answer your question about, No.
I think that war should have been run better period, but I don't know whether part of that better running would involve no draft. Does that make sense? Like would you have supported the draft if the US wasn't just sending green kids into a meat grinder? If the whole thing was run better? Or is it an objection based on the war itself?
 

Lord Zero

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If the US suddenly found itself in a full scale war with China or Russia and you asked me if I thought there should be a draft, I would say "Fuck yes."
I would say "no". America is large enough and populated enough and geographically isolated enough to justify a volunteer only military. The reason I give Israel a pass is because it's a small country that's surrounded on three sides by extremely hostile nations (it's position sitting on a body of water is the the only reason it's not surrounded on all four sides).

On a philosophical level, I don't think it's right to order anyone to put their lives in danger without their consent unless death is almost guaranteed if you don't.
 

Stormrider666

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I think that war should have been run better period, but I don't know whether part of that better running would involve no draft. Does that make sense? Like would you have supported the draft if the US wasn't just sending green kids into a meat grinder? If the whole thing was run better? Or is it an objection based on the war itself?
Its partly based on an objection to the war itself. But it also has to do with things like draft exemptions. You ever hear the saying, "Rich man's war, poor man's fight".
 

Neon

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I would say "no". America is large enough and populated enough and geographically isolated enough to justify a volunteer only military. The reason I give Israel a pass is because it's a small country that's surrounded on three sides by extremely hostile nations (it's position sitting on a body of water is the the only reason it's not surrounded on all four sides).

On a philosophical level, I don't think it's right to order anyone to put themselves into harm's way without their consent.
But is it ok to enjoy the luxuries of your country of origin without helping to defend them when they are at risk? See, that's why I don't think I can really participate here. I think I have a total outsider's view of this issue.

Its partly based on an objection to the war itself. But it also has to do with things like draft exemptions. You ever hear the saying, "Rich man's war, poor man's fight".
Objection to draft because of objection to a specific war is a problematic issue, but never mind that now. However, again it seems like you are basing your objection to the concept based on the execution. Even if I supported a draft, it doesn't mean I supported THE draft (i.e how it was carried out). But again, as I said above, I really think I can't truly get into your heads because I wasn't born here. There are many topics where I consider my thinking to be very American, but I don't think this is one of them.
 

Neon

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Morally? No. Legally? Yes.
I definitely see your line of thinking here. I think this really is a difference in origin. See, America was sorta founded on the basis of government being separate from individual people. Israel was founded more like an "us against them" as a whole, and there is an implied social contract of serving your country woven in to that mentality. Even the Israel advocacy work I did here in the States was sorta related to that. Definitely interesting to hear you guys' perspective on it, though. Normally I just hear the tired old "Maaaaan!" arguments against it, which automatically want to make me support it.
 

Josh_R

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I think that a draft is completely unconstitutional, as there is no authority to force any person into military service. It is also quite antithetical to the spirit of the this country and the Constitution. If there are a number of things that the federal government cannot do to you, how is it excusable to completely take over one's life and force them into servitude against their will?

EDIT: after doing a little reading, it would seem that there is a constitutional argument for the draft, but I disagree with the reasoning. There are also Supreme Court rulings on the subject. If you care, read here:
http://www.usconstitution.net/consttop_drft.html