Santorum is everywhere after coming from the rear in resurgent campaign

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Santorum's wins shake up Republican race

Steven Hurst
February 9, 2012 - 5:29AM

Rick Santorum's stunning victories in Minnesota, Missouri and Colorado are marking his best performance in the rollicking contest for the Republican presidential nomination - and Mitt Romney's worst.

The losses by the better-funded and organised Romney were stinging reminders of his inability to appeal to the growing conservative movement at the base of the party.

It was far from clear whether Santorum, who remains a long-shot candidate, would be able to turn the momentum from Tuesday's wins into the millions of dollars he would need to overtake the very wealthy Romney in the race to challenge President Barack Obama in November. But Santorum said on Wednesday his campaign raised a quarter of a million dollars online on Tuesday night.

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"If money made the difference, we would not have won four primaries so far," he told CNN.

Santorum, a former Pennsylvania senator, has hammered Romney, a former Massachusetts governor, as being too moderate to satisfy deeply conservative Republicans and their desire to stop Obama from a second term. The conservative voters distrust Romney's thinking on sensitive issues such as abortion and gay rights after he once held more moderate views.

Tuesday's developments shifted the Republican political narrative just as some conservatives had begun to embrace Romney in the first step toward what many in the party hoped would be a swift end to the nomination fight.

Now the contest threatens to rumble past March 6, when 10 states vote in what is called Super Tuesday.

Santorum's wins also pushed former front-runner Newt Gingrich, a former House of Representatives speaker, further out of the spotlight with a reminder that the campaign remains more than a two-man race. Gingrich is hoping that Super Tuesday, which includes states from his Southern base, will bring him back next month.

Santorum told CNN he thinks conservative Republicans "are beginning to get" that he represents the party's best chance to oust Obama.

He said Romney, a former venture capitalist, "had a great career in the private sector, but we're not running for CEO of the country. We're running for someone who can lead the country."

Romney shrugged off his poor showing after his back-to-back victories last week in Florida and Nevada.

"I want to congratulate Senator Santorum, but I expect to become the nominee with your help," Romney told supporters on Tuesday.

When Romney ran for the Republican nomination four years ago, he prevailed in Minnesota and Colorado. The Republican Party has become more conservative in both states since then.

The victories were the first for Santorum since he eked out a 34-vote win over Romney in the leadoff Iowa caucuses a month ago. Santorum faded far from the lead after that, and Gingrich seemed to eclipse him as the leading conservative rival to Romney when he won the South Carolina primary late last month.

Gingrich stayed out of sight as the results rolled in on Tuesday night.

Overall, Romney has 107 delegates. Santorum has 45, Gingrich has 32 and Texan congressman Ron Paul has nine. The nominee needs to amass at least 1,144 delegates.
http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-new...-shake-up-republican-race-20120209-1rjj7.html
 

Begbie

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He said Romney, a former venture capitalist, "had a great career in the private sector, but we're not running for CEO of the country. We're running for someone who can lead the country."
 

MayrMeninoCrash

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Weren't the Missouri and Minnesota primaries non-binding? I'm surprised Superman didn't edge out Mickey Mouse in those states.
 

Norm Stansfield

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He said Romney, a former venture capitalist, "had a great career in the private sector, but we're not running for CEO of the country. We're running for someone who can lead the country."
Lead the government. The only way this retarded piece of fuck will lead me is if he first cuts my brain out with a steak knife.
 

Absolutely

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Weren't the Missouri and Minnesota primaries non-binding? I'm surprised Superman didn't edge out Mickey Mouse in those states.
Missouri's was "Just for fun" essentially, as it meant nothing. But cost around 7 Million to hold...
Newt wasn't on the ballot, and they'll hold a caucus in a month to decide who really gets the delegates.

Stupid Missouri
 

fletcher

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A+ on the thread title. That's all.
 

Begbie

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Overall, Romney has 107 delegates. Santorum has 45, Gingrich has 32 and Texan congressman Ron Paul has nine.
Fuckin GOP establishment-funded media...they have to spell out the number of delegates Ron Paul has, yet they don't spell out the others.



:icon_cool
 

Don the Radio Guy

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In most news style guides numbers under ten are always spelled out.

And the best thing about Santorum is the rage and ignorance he inspires in people. It's hilarious.
 

jnoble

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I'm a conservative..

...but Santorum comes across to me like a whiny wimp. A Republican version of Jimmy Carter with the sweater vests. He seems like a decent guy and I'm not doubting his convictions and character, but he just seems like a weenie compared to Romney.
 

Pigdango

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In most news style guides numbers under ten are always spelled out.

And the best thing about Santorum is the rage and ignorance he inspires in people. It's hilarious.
I thought that was the best thing about Ann Coulter? And I thought that was the worst thing about Sarah Palin, but also the thing that was going to get her elected to the office she's not running for? How many rage bots do we need in the GOP?
 

Neckbeard

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Rick Santorum is a whiner and a pussy "Because Jesus" candidate. He stands no chance against Barack Obama. However odious and blundering the President has been, is right now, and will continue to be, Obama would crush Santorum in the election.

I am firmly in Any Republican At All camp right now. I don't give a fuck so much about the policies. The number one question is, Can He Beat Obama? So far Mitt Romney, as boring and as bland and corporatist and completely underwhelming and liberal as he is, is the best guy for the Beat Obama job.
 

whiskeyguy

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I am firmly in Any Republican At All camp right now. I don't give a fuck so much about the policies. The number one question is, Can He Beat Obama? So far Mitt Romney, as boring and as bland and corporatist and completely underwhelming and liberal as he is, is the best guy for the Beat Obama job.
I'm of the same mentality, but I doubt I could bring myself to vote for Santorum in the general election. If he gets the nomination (he won't), I will probably be voting third party.
 

Don the Radio Guy

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In other words, you'd vote for Obama over Santorum. Thank god for the Electoral College.
 

Begbie

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Rick Santorum is a whiner and a pussy "Because Jesus" candidate. He stands no chance against Barack Obama. However odious and blundering the President has been, is right now, and will continue to be, Obama would crush Santorum in the election.

I am firmly in Any Republican At All camp right now. I don't give a fuck so much about the policies. The number one question is, Can He Beat Obama? So far Mitt Romney, as boring and as bland and corporatist and completely underwhelming and liberal as he is, is the best guy for the Beat Obama job.
I wouldn't say Santorum stands no chance in the general election against BHO. There are plenty of variables in play that could really hurt or help the candidates and Obama. The Supreme Court ruling on Obamacare would be a biggie. VP picks are another biggie...if Obama could actually kick Biden to the curb and if he can find a better spoken, well respected democrat to run with...it could change things up. And it's pretty clear...Obama will not get the same treatment from Independents as he did in 2008...and it's quite possible it might not even be remotely close. What they do is completely up in the air. I'm even leaving out the fact that a third party candidate could really recklessly fuck things up and hand Obama the win. Just so many question marks.

But yes, as it stands...Romney has the best chance of winning of the 4 remaining GOP candidates.

whiskeyguy said:
I'm of the same mentality, but I doubt I could bring myself to vote for Santorum in the general election. If he gets the nomination (he won't), I will probably be voting third party.
This is how I feel about Paul. Except I just wouldn't vote...I could never bring myself to vote 3rd party just "to send a message, maaaaaaan!".
 

whiskeyguy

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This is how I feel about Paul. Except I just wouldn't vote...I could never bring myself to vote 3rd party just "to send a message, maaaaaaan!".
I'd absolutely take Paul over Romney. I think he could also beat Obama, because the hardcore conservatives are voting GOP anyway, and he would bring a lot of independents in.
 

Begbie

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I'd absolutely take Paul over Romney. I think he could also beat Obama, because the hardcore conservatives are voting GOP anyway, and he would bring a lot of independents in.
Yeeeeeah, I've been pretty open about my disgust for Ron Paul. Just a little open. :rolleyes: I'd have a real hard time voting for him, and I know I wouldn't be the only conservative out there who feels that way. Besides the fact that he's 77 and should really be open NOW about who he would consider naming as his VP (Judge Napolitano is the last guy I would ever think could be capable of VP), and the fact that he has a history of "waaaay out there" views and unproven, yet potentially destructive foreign policy...yeah, let's just say I'm thankful this guy is likely not getting the nomination.
 

Yesterdays Hero

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Heh. Santorum. Goddam is Dan Savage great.

Rick went to google moaning how when his name was entered, the first thing that came up was...well....go check. He wanted it changed, and google said "Nope. Tough."
 

whiskeyguy

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Yeeeeeah, I've been pretty open about my disgust for Ron Paul. Just a little open. :rolleyes: I'd have a real hard time voting for him, and I know I wouldn't be the only conservative out there who feels that way. Besides the fact that he's 77 and should really be open NOW about who he would consider naming as his VP (Judge Napolitano is the last guy I would ever think could be capable of VP), and the fact that he has a history of "waaaay out there" views and unproven, yet potentially destructive foreign policy...yeah, let's just say I'm thankful this guy is likely not getting the nomination.
Right now my biggest issue is fiscal policy... I care a lot less about the other issues. I do disagree with some of his foreign policy views, but on domestic issues I really like what he has to say. I just don't see Romney doing much of anything regarding our fiscal policy besides accruing a little less debt than Obama is. He'd be better than Obama, but not by a lot.
 

Norm Stansfield

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Right now my biggest issue is fiscal policy... I care a lot less about the other issues. I do disagree with some of his foreign policy views, but on domestic issues I really like what he has to say. I just don't see Romney doing much of anything regarding our fiscal policy besides accruing a little less debt than Obama is.
Obama can't accrue a cent of debt without Republican support. And he doesn't have it. Romney will have it, and he will use it for entitlement programs.
 

Begbie

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Right now my biggest issue is fiscal policy... I care a lot less about the other issues. I do disagree with some of his foreign policy views, but on domestic issues I really like what he has to say. I just don't see Romney doing much of anything regarding our fiscal policy besides accruing a little less debt than Obama is. He'd be better than Obama, but not by a lot.
I agree on fiscal policy being the most important issue, without question...and I'm mostly in Paul's corner when it comes to that. I would care alot less about the other issues of a candidate only if said candidate didn't have, what I would consider, extreme views on other subjects. And I consider Paul's foreign policy pretty extreme. I'd just rather not go down that road because I just think he grossly underestimates the impact a future foreign conflict (that we're no longer meddling in or paying attention to) would have on our people, especially one's living abroad...and more importantly, our economy.

With that said, none of the 4 candidates are any good, IMO. And part of me has been hoping for the impossible...someone else popping into the race and finally making sense. That hasn't and likely won't happen. I'll settle with Pretty Boy Mitt...and feel even better about him if he has a good VP pick and can surround himself with better people than Obama.
 

Lord Zero

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...but Santorum comes across to me like a whiny wimp. A Republican version of Jimmy Carter with the sweater vests. He seems like a decent guy and I'm not doubting his convictions and character, but he just seems like a weenie compared to Romney.
Santorum isn't a decent guy. You can't seek to control how people live their lives like he does and be a good person.
 

Begbie

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Attack the man for his beliefs...attack him for the decisions he's made...but to HELL WITH YOU ALL for attacking the man's sweater vests!!!



:icon_cool
 

Josh_R

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Santorum isn't a decent guy. You can't seek to control how people live their lives like he does and be a good person.
I have a personal vendetta against Santorum. There is something I despise about someone who is so totally obsessed with other peoples lives. You don't like gays, fine, but to go so far as to base a large part of your platform on taking away every civil right that you possibly can is atrocious. Just imagine where he would be if instead of using the word "gay" he was saying "black". No fucking way would a candidate calling for blacks to be denied to marry, or adopt kids, or saying blacks are the reason our society is (allegedly) crumbling, be winning caucuses and primaries with 55% of the vote.




Santorum’s wins reveal deep problems for a Republican Party in search of direction

Feb. 8, 2012

Rick Santorum, the former Pennsylvania senator who polled in single digits as recently as December, swept to victories in three states Tuesday, reshaping the landscape of the GOP presidential nominating process and raising more questions about the Republican party’s ability to build a consensus around the eventual nominee, whomever he may be.



Santorum won overwhelming victories in Minnesota and Missouri, although the Missouri primary was nonbinding and actual delegates will be chosen at the Missouri caucuses in March. The socially conservative Santorum came from behind in Colorado, overtaking former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who had led in early returns there.

Santorum told supporters in St. Charles, Mo., that conservatism was “alive and well in Missouri and Minnesota” and that he was not trying to be the conservative alternative to Mitt Romney but rather “the conservative alternative to Barack Obama.”



Santorum has now won more state contests, four, than Romney, the leader in delegates, who has won three. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich has won one state, South Carolina, while Ron Paul’s best finishes have been second-place showings. According to CNN, Romney has 106 delegates of the 1,144 needed to nominate, while Gingrich sits in second with 38. Santorum has 22 and Paul has 20. The next GOP results will be from Maine, where numbers from the weeklong Maine caucuses will be announced Saturday. Romney and Paul are vying for the top spot in Maine.



GOP identity crisis grows with Santorum victories



Far from indicating wide appeal to numerous demographic groups, Tuesday’s caucus results underscore the enormous challenge facing the Republican Party not only in unseating President Obama in November but in crafting a viable direction for the GOP that can boost the party’s sagging popularity.



Romney, the so-called “establishment candidate,” fails to inspire enthusiasm in both the libertarian and fundamentalist Christian wings of the party, but Santorum, a Roman Catholic and social conservative, is no friend of liberty and stands to the right of Pope Benedict XVI on issues regarding birth control. Gingrich has even lower favorability numbers than Santorum, whereas Paul, despite running a good campaign on several fronts, is not gaining traction with the types of voters who booed him when he invoked the Christian “Golden Rule” in a South Carolina debate.



When Abraham Lincoln said that a House divided against itself cannot stand during his famous 1858 speech in Springfield, Ill., he was referring to the nation, not the Republican Party which he helped bring to prominence. But some 154 years later, the great untold story of the 2011-2012 GOP nominating process is the fracturing of the party along ideological grounds that are, by and large, incompatible. In “The Second Coming,” the 20th-century Irish poet William Butler Yeats ominously wrote, “The centre cannot hold.” It’s not that the GOP’s center cannot hold — it’s that it no longer has one.



What remained of Ronald Reagan’s “11th Commandment” – to avoid speaking ill of another Republican – was shattered on the campaign trail this go-round as accusations flew like darts during Happy Hour at a college-town bar. We may well be witnessing nothing less than the last gasps of a party on the fast track to self-destruction, torn apart by the conflicting demands of Romney voters who support unfettered “vulture” capitalism, Santorum voters who crave a Christian theocracy that would severely limit personal freedoms, Gingrich voters who just want to see someone, however flawed, who can “dish it out” to Obama in the General Election, and Paul voters, who want maximum personal liberties with minimal government restrictions.



The GOP tent is no longer big enough to accommodate all these interests. The Republican Party as we knew it from 1980 through the 2010 midterms belongs to the ages, a victim of its own self-deceptions and internal contradictions, no longer taken seriously by more than half the population and feared rather than embraced by another quarter.



This is not to say that the GOP will not rise again. It took the Democrats 16 years to elect a president after Jimmy Carter beat Gerald Ford in 1976, but they did it. Still, the damage George W. Bush did to his party is not going to be forgotten anytime soon, certainly not when President Obama is guaranteed to face to candidate with favorability ratings at least 15 points lower than his own. The larger story for the Republicans is not who they are going to nominate to face Obama in November, but where do they go from there after losing? They are in the process of sorting that out now, but it may take more than one election cycle to do it.



Gary Johnson factor looms even larger



With the GOP electorate in disarray and none of the four standing candidates viewed as favorably as the president, the time has never been better for a serious third party candidate. Former two-term New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson, a Republican turned Libertarian after being shut out of the GOP debates throughout 2011, is that candidate.



As Johnson’s national exposure grows and the GOP eventually settles on a nominee, voters are going to realize that they finally have the viable third party candidate they have been looking for all these years. Johnson represents what he believes is the fastest growing voter demographic in the United States: socially liberal and fiscally conservative.



At this point, Johnson has more executive experience – eight years – than Romney and Obama combined. As the GOP continues its tragicomic nominating process, Johnson’s words that he did not leave the Republican Party but rather that the party left him will resonate not only with unsatisfied Republicans but receptive Democrats and independents as well. With the Libertarian convention scheduled for early May, it’s only a matter of time until Gary Johnson bursts onto the national scene. Obama holds all the cards when it comes to defeating whomever the GOP nominates, but he doesn’t hold the wild card. That game-changer belongs to Johnson alone, and astute political observers fully expect it to be played.