Share Your Turkey Recipes

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ONA
Wackbag Staff
Aug 14, 2000
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#1
Thanksgiving is only three days away. Please share your turkey recipes that work well.
 

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
77,882
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Seattle
#2
1. Peel back film on turkey side only.
2. Microwave on high for 3 1/2 minutes.
3. Let stand one minute.
4. Carefully peel back film from potatoes and stuffing. Steam can burn.
5. Enjoy.
 
Likes: ruckstande

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
Donator
Mar 10, 2006
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#4
This year I'll probably drape the breast with bacon strips... if you have to ask why, kill yourself.

Bourbon and maple syrup glaze.

Maybe a lovely thick butter/sage rub beneath the skin.

No stuffins' inside my birds. Just flavorins like cinnamon stick, poultry bundle of sage, rosemary, thyme, etc... big chunks o' onion, etc...

Cook it same as BIV though... pop it right in the microwave.
 

ruckstande

Posts mostly from the shitter.
Apr 2, 2005
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#5
Alton Brown like most people now. It's great so why change it?

Question about bacon though, would it cook the same if I stuffed the bird with bacon?
 

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
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Mar 10, 2006
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#7
Actually, you should try salt pork cut into 1/4" slices. The technique is called "Barding".

The bacon would render too quickly, and overdoes the smoky flavor.

My 2 cents.
Ooooooo... me likey.

Barding, you say? Never heard of that... but it sounds awesome.
 

samurai

Ridiculum Anserini
May 16, 2007
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#8
Ooooooo... me likey.

Barding, you say? Never heard of that... but it sounds awesome.
I got the plan from America's Test Kitchen 2 years ago. I have the episode on DVR, so I'll transcribe the important pernts and get back to you.

Note: This is only to be used for a toikey without a salt solution injected by the producer, as many store bought birds are, lest it becomes too salty.
 

ruckstande

Posts mostly from the shitter.
Apr 2, 2005
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South Jersey
#11
I got the plan from America's Test Kitchen 2 years ago. I have the episode on DVR, so I'll transcribe the important pernts and get back to you.

Note: This is only to be used for a toikey without a salt solution injected by the producer, as many store bought birds are, lest it becomes too salty.
How would you know?
 

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
77,882
27,154
898
Seattle
#12
Do you know young turkeys chirp and don't start gobbling till they are eight months old?

 

samurai

Ridiculum Anserini
May 16, 2007
20,625
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Chicago
#13
How would you know?
I trust ATK/Cook's Country/Cook's Illustrated. They'll do recipes dozens/hundreds of times so we don't have to. Much like Alton Brown, they explain the science behind why something works. If they say it's so...it be so.

For THP, the segment was called "Old Fashioned Stuffed Turkey". Here's a quick rundown on what they do...

Why this recipe works:
Perfecting one aspect of a roast turkey usually comes at the cost of another. Crisp skin means dry white meat. Brining adds moisture, but can turn the skin soggy. And stuffing the cavity -compounds the headache, slowing the roasting time and upping the chance for uneven cooking. We wanted a turkey with everything: juicy meat, crisply burnished skin, and rich-flavored stuffing that cooked inside the bird.
Unwilling to sacrifice crisp skin, we opted for salting over brining. Salting initially draws moisture out of the meat, but after a long rest in the refrigerator, all the moisture gets slowly drawn back in, seasoning the meat and helping it retain moisture. Next we turned to slow roasting and started the bird in a relatively low oven, then cranked the temperature to give it a final blast of skin-crisping heat and to bring the center up to temperature. It worked beautifully, yielding breast meat that was moist and tender. For even crispier skin, we massaged it with a baking powder and salt rub. The baking powder dehydrates the skin and raises its pH, making it more conducive to browning. We also poked holes in the skin to help rendering fat escape.
Next we had to figure out a way to coordinate the cooking times of the stuffing and the breast meat. In most recipes, the breast meat is a bone-dry 180 degrees by the time the stuffing reaches a safe 165 degrees. We got around this by splitting the stuffing in half. We put half in the turkey and took it out when the bird was up to temperature. We moistened the stuffing with broth and combined it with the uncooked batch and cooked it all while the turkey was taking its post-oven rest. And for extra flavor, we draped the bird with meaty salt pork, which we removed and drained before cranking up the heat so the bird didn’t taste too smoky.
Here's the whole recipe, if anyone cares...

Old-Fashioned Stuffed Turkey

From America's Test Kitchen Season 11: Thanksgiving Turkey
Why this recipe works:
Perfecting one aspect of a roast turkey usually comes at the cost of another. Crisp skin means dry white meat. Brining adds moisture, but can turn the skin soggy. And stuffing the cavity -compounds the headache, slowing the roasting time and upping the chance for uneven cooking. We wanted a turkey with everything: juicy meat, crisply burnished skin, and rich-flavored stuffing that cooked inside the bird.
Unwilling to sacrifice crisp skin, we opted for salting over brining. Salting initially draws moisture out of the meat, but after a long rest in the refrigerator, all the moisture gets slowly drawn back in, seasoning the meat and helping it retain moisture. Next we turned to slow roasting and started the bird in a relatively low oven, then cranked the temperature to give it a final blast of skin-crisping heat and to bring the center up to temperature. It worked beautifully, yielding breast meat that was moist and tender. For even crispier skin, we massaged it with a baking powder and salt rub. The baking powder dehydrates the skin and raises its pH, making it more conducive to browning. We also poked holes in the skin to help rendering fat escape.
Next we had to figure out a way to coordinate the cooking times of the stuffing and the breast meat. In most recipes, the breast meat is a bone-dry 180 degrees by the time the stuffing reaches a safe 165 degrees. We got around this by splitting the stuffing in half. We put half in the turkey and took it out when the bird was up to temperature. We moistened the stuffing with broth and combined it with the uncooked batch and cooked it all while the turkey was taking its post-oven rest. And for extra flavor, we draped the bird with meaty salt pork, which we removed and drained before cranking up the heat so the bird didn’t taste too smoky. (less)

Serves 10 to 12


Table salt is not recommended for this recipe because it is too fine. To roast a kosher or self-basting turkey (such as a frozen Butterball), do not salt it in step 1. Look for salt pork that is roughly equal parts fat and lean meat. The bread can be toasted up to 1 day in advance.
Ingredients

Turkey

  • 1 turkey (12 to 15 pounds), giblets and neck reserved for gravy, if making (see note)
  • 3tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons kosher salt (see note)
  • 2teaspoons baking powder
  • 12ounces salt pork, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices and rinsed (see note)
Stuffing

  • 1 1/2pounds white sandwich bread (about 15 slices), cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 12 cups)
  • 4tablespoons unsalted butter, plus extra for baking dish
  • 1medium onion, chopped fine (about 1 cup)
  • 2 celery ribs, chopped fine (about 1 cup)
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • 2tablespoons minced fresh thyme leaves
  • 1tablespoon minced fresh marjoram leaves
  • 1tablespoon minced fresh sage leaves
  • 1 1/2cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 136-inch square cheesecloth, folded in quarters
  • 2large eggs
Instructions

  • 1. FOR THE TURKEY: Using fingers or handle of wooden spoon, separate turkey skin from meat on breast, legs, thighs, and back; avoid breaking skin. Rub 1 tablespoon salt evenly inside cavity of turkey, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt under skin of each breast, and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt under skin of each leg. Wrap turkey tightly with plastic wrap; refrigerate 24 to 48 hours.
  • 2. FOR THE STUFFING: Adjust oven rack to lowest position and heat oven to 250 degrees. Spread bread cubes in single layer on baking sheet; bake until edges have dried but centers are slightly moist (cubes should yield to pressure), about 45 minutes, stirring several times during baking. Transfer to large bowl and increase oven temperature to 325 degrees.
  • 3. While bread dries, heat 4 tablespoons butter in 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat; when foaming subsides, add onion, celery, 2 teaspoons salt, and 1 teaspoon pepper; cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables begin to soften and brown slightly, 7 to 10 minutes. Stir in herbs; cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add vegetables to bowl with dried bread; add 1 cup broth and toss until evenly moistened.
  • 4. TO ROAST THE TURKEY: Combine remaining 2 teaspoons kosher salt and baking powder in small bowl. Remove turkey from refrigerator and unwrap. Thoroughly dry inside and out with paper towels. Using skewer, poke 15 to 20 holes in fat deposits on top of breast halves and thighs, 4 to 5 holes in each deposit. Sprinkle surface of turkey with salt-baking powder mixture and rub in mixture with hands, coating skin evenly. Tuck wings underneath turkey. Line turkey cavity with cheesecloth, pack with 4 to 5 cups stuffing, tie ends of cheesecloth together. Cover remaining stuffing with plastic wrap and refrigerate. Using twine, loosely tie turkey legs together. Place turkey breast-side down in V-rack set in roasting pan and drape salt pork slices over back.
  • 5. Roast turkey breast-side down until thickest part of breast registers 130 degrees on instant-read thermometer, 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Remove roasting pan from oven (close oven door) and increase oven temperature to 450 degrees. Transfer turkey in V-rack to rimmed baking sheet. Remove and discard salt pork. Using clean potholders or kitchen towels, rotate turkey breast-side up. Cut twine binding legs and remove stuffing bag; empty into reserved stuffing in bowl. Pour drippings from roasting pan into fat separator and reserve for gravy, if making.
  • 6. Once oven has come to temperature, return turkey in V-rack to roasting pan and roast until skin is golden brown and crisp, thickest part of breast registers 160 degrees, and thickest part of thigh registers 175 degrees, about 45 minutes, rotating pan halfway through. Transfer turkey to carving board and let rest, uncovered, 30 minutes.
  • 7. While turkey rests, reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees. Whisk eggs and remaining 1/2 cup broth together in small bowl. Pour egg mixture over stuffing and toss to combine, breaking up any large chunks; spread in buttered 13- by 9-inch baking dish. Bake until stuffing registers 165 degrees and top is golden brown, about 15 minutes. Carve turkey and serve with stuffing.
 
Last edited:
Likes: ruckstande

samurai

Ridiculum Anserini
May 16, 2007
20,625
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Chicago
#14
Techniques involved...
  • Secrets to Old-Fashioned Stuffed Turkey


    1. DRY BRINE Salting turkey 24 to 48 hours seasons meat and keeps moisture inside.

  • 2. STAB THE FAT Poking holes in fatty deposits speeds up fat-rendering process.

  • 3. DRY RUB Rubbing skin with baking powder and salt just before roasting encourages browning.

  • 4. BARD Draping strips of salt pork on turkey as it roasts enriches it with deep flavor.

  • 5. INSIDE OUT Combining stuffing cooked inside bird with uncooked stuffing, then baking, yields best flavor.

  • 6. HIGH-HEAT FINISH Blasting bird with intense heat for last 45 minutes of roasting helps crisp skin.
 
Dec 12, 2007
25,182
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#15
America's test kitchen has grown on me. I find it far better for cooking tips then most shows on food network, since most food network shows are cooking competitions. I love iron chef but I learn jack shit from it.
 

samurai

Ridiculum Anserini
May 16, 2007
20,625
4,130
568
Chicago
#16
America's test kitchen has grown on me. I find it far better for cooking tips then most shows on food network, since most food network shows are cooking competitions. I love iron chef but I learn jack shit from it.
I gave up on watching the Food Network a few years ago. Alton Brown was the only useful show, so of course, they pulled it. :asshat:

Most of the good cooking programs (where you can actually learn something) are on PBS.

I will admit, I still watch Nigella on Cook channel, it's especially nice when she wears her silky robe and does some violent chopping. BOUNCY-BOUNCY!!

 

ruckstande

Posts mostly from the shitter.
Apr 2, 2005
14,726
4,287
678
South Jersey
#17
I trust ATK/Cook's Country/Cook's Illustrated. They'll do recipes dozens/hundreds of times so we don't have to. Much like Alton Brown, they explain the science behind why something works. If they say it's so...it be so.

For THP, the segment was called "Old Fashioned Stuffed Turkey". Here's a quick rundown on what they do...



Here's the whole recipe, if anyone cares...

Old-Fashioned Stuffed Turkey

From America's Test Kitchen Season 11: Thanksgiving Turkey
Why this recipe works:
Perfecting one aspect of a roast turkey usually comes at the cost of another. Crisp skin means dry white meat. Brining adds moisture, but can turn the skin soggy. And stuffing the cavity -compounds the headache, slowing the roasting time and upping the chance for uneven cooking. We wanted a turkey with everything: juicy meat, crisply burnished skin, and rich-flavored stuffing that cooked inside the bird.
Unwilling to sacrifice crisp skin, we opted for salting over brining. Salting initially draws moisture out of the meat, but after a long rest in the refrigerator, all the moisture gets slowly drawn back in, seasoning the meat and helping it retain moisture. Next we turned to slow roasting and started the bird in a relatively low oven, then cranked the temperature to give it a final blast of skin-crisping heat and to bring the center up to temperature. It worked beautifully, yielding breast meat that was moist and tender. For even crispier skin, we massaged it with a baking powder and salt rub. The baking powder dehydrates the skin and raises its pH, making it more conducive to browning. We also poked holes in the skin to help rendering fat escape.
Next we had to figure out a way to coordinate the cooking times of the stuffing and the breast meat. In most recipes, the breast meat is a bone-dry 180 degrees by the time the stuffing reaches a safe 165 degrees. We got around this by splitting the stuffing in half. We put half in the turkey and took it out when the bird was up to temperature. We moistened the stuffing with broth and combined it with the uncooked batch and cooked it all while the turkey was taking its post-oven rest. And for extra flavor, we draped the bird with meaty salt pork, which we removed and drained before cranking up the heat so the bird didn’t taste too smoky. (less)

Serves 10 to 12


Table salt is not recommended for this recipe because it is too fine. To roast a kosher or self-basting turkey (such as a frozen Butterball), do not salt it in step 1. Look for salt pork that is roughly equal parts fat and lean meat. The bread can be toasted up to 1 day in advance.
Ingredients

Turkey

  • 1 turkey (12 to 15 pounds), giblets and neck reserved for gravy, if making (see note)
  • 3tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons kosher salt (see note)
  • 2teaspoons baking powder
  • 12ounces salt pork, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices and rinsed (see note)
Stuffing

  • 1 1/2pounds white sandwich bread (about 15 slices), cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 12 cups)
  • 4tablespoons unsalted butter, plus extra for baking dish
  • 1medium onion, chopped fine (about 1 cup)
  • 2 celery ribs, chopped fine (about 1 cup)
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • 2tablespoons minced fresh thyme leaves
  • 1tablespoon minced fresh marjoram leaves
  • 1tablespoon minced fresh sage leaves
  • 1 1/2cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 136-inch square cheesecloth, folded in quarters
  • 2large eggs
Instructions

  • 1. FOR THE TURKEY: Using fingers or handle of wooden spoon, separate turkey skin from meat on breast, legs, thighs, and back; avoid breaking skin. Rub 1 tablespoon salt evenly inside cavity of turkey, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt under skin of each breast, and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt under skin of each leg. Wrap turkey tightly with plastic wrap; refrigerate 24 to 48 hours.
  • 2. FOR THE STUFFING: Adjust oven rack to lowest position and heat oven to 250 degrees. Spread bread cubes in single layer on baking sheet; bake until edges have dried but centers are slightly moist (cubes should yield to pressure), about 45 minutes, stirring several times during baking. Transfer to large bowl and increase oven temperature to 325 degrees.
  • 3. While bread dries, heat 4 tablespoons butter in 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat; when foaming subsides, add onion, celery, 2 teaspoons salt, and 1 teaspoon pepper; cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables begin to soften and brown slightly, 7 to 10 minutes. Stir in herbs; cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add vegetables to bowl with dried bread; add 1 cup broth and toss until evenly moistened.
  • 4. TO ROAST THE TURKEY: Combine remaining 2 teaspoons kosher salt and baking powder in small bowl. Remove turkey from refrigerator and unwrap. Thoroughly dry inside and out with paper towels. Using skewer, poke 15 to 20 holes in fat deposits on top of breast halves and thighs, 4 to 5 holes in each deposit. Sprinkle surface of turkey with salt-baking powder mixture and rub in mixture with hands, coating skin evenly. Tuck wings underneath turkey. Line turkey cavity with cheesecloth, pack with 4 to 5 cups stuffing, tie ends of cheesecloth together. Cover remaining stuffing with plastic wrap and refrigerate. Using twine, loosely tie turkey legs together. Place turkey breast-side down in V-rack set in roasting pan and drape salt pork slices over back.
  • 5. Roast turkey breast-side down until thickest part of breast registers 130 degrees on instant-read thermometer, 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Remove roasting pan from oven (close oven door) and increase oven temperature to 450 degrees. Transfer turkey in V-rack to rimmed baking sheet. Remove and discard salt pork. Using clean potholders or kitchen towels, rotate turkey breast-side up. Cut twine binding legs and remove stuffing bag; empty into reserved stuffing in bowl. Pour drippings from roasting pan into fat separator and reserve for gravy, if making.
  • 6. Once oven has come to temperature, return turkey in V-rack to roasting pan and roast until skin is golden brown and crisp, thickest part of breast registers 160 degrees, and thickest part of thigh registers 175 degrees, about 45 minutes, rotating pan halfway through. Transfer turkey to carving board and let rest, uncovered, 30 minutes.
  • 7. While turkey rests, reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees. Whisk eggs and remaining 1/2 cup broth together in small bowl. Pour egg mixture over stuffing and toss to combine, breaking up any large chunks; spread in buttered 13- by 9-inch baking dish. Bake until stuffing registers 165 degrees and top is golden brown, about 15 minutes. Carve turkey and serve with stuffing.
Thanks but my question was about how would you know if it was salt injected.
 

crippledalbino

The God of 42nd Street
Donator
Aug 16, 2006
40,409
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The Oh-See, Fuck-Asses
#21
Same thing I did last year.
Herb Butter made in a food processor all over that bitch.
Cook for like, eh, two hours or so basting with chicken stock and butter drippings every fifteen minutes.
When the white meat is done, pull the bird out, then cut the leggy-thighs off. Let the white meat sit, it's done.

Now braise the dark meat leggy-thighs in the pan with all the drippings, tightly wrapped in foil, for another two hours. When you're ready to serve, hit the white meat up with boiling chicken stock to get it back up to temperature, but it will still be delicious, juicy, and most importantly, not overcooked because you didn't overcook the shit out of the breast while waiting for the leggy-thighs to get done.
 

samurai

Ridiculum Anserini
May 16, 2007
20,625
4,130
568
Chicago
#22
Thanks but my question was about how would you know if it was salt injected.
Sorry Ruck. Now I actually get the gist of your question. At Wackbag, I usually take 2 way questions the wrong way.

As you intended: How would you know?

As I read it: How would YOU know?

Me: :asshat:

:action-sm


Note: Stormrider is correct, it (by law) must say on the label somewhere if it's injected with a salt solution.
 
Likes: ruckstande
Dec 12, 2007
25,182
11,167
438
#25
Brined turkey: quartered and roasted with fall veggies
Garlic whipped mashed potatoes
Cornbread stuffing
Potato and Leek Soup

My parents buy some surgary horseshit for dessert. Everything else I make.
 
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