shit ill be watching on c span tonight.

nikoloslvy

I wear my sunglasses at night...Anyone want fries?
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[FONT=arial, helvetica]09:15 PM EDT[/FONT]
[FONT=arial, helvetica]0:55 (est.)[/FONT]
[FONT=arial, helvetica]Speech[/FONT]
[FONT=arial, helvetica]Infidel
American Enterprise Institute
[/FONT] [FONT=arial, helvetica] Ayaan Hirsi Ali [/FONT][FONT=arial, helvetica], American Enterprise Institute

[/FONT][FONT=arial, helvetica][/FONT][FONT=arial, helvetica][/FONT]
[FONT=arial, helvetica]10:10 PM EDT[/FONT]
[FONT=arial, helvetica]1:15 (est.)[/FONT]
[FONT=arial, helvetica]Speech[/FONT]
[FONT=arial, helvetica]The Trouble with Islam
Center for New Words
[/FONT] [FONT=arial, helvetica] Irshad Manji
[/FONT]
Infidel (Hardcover)
by Ayaan Hirsi Ali (Author)
Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Readers with an eye on European politics will recognize Ali as the Somali-born member of the Dutch parliament who faced death threats after collaborating on a film about domestic violence against Muslim women with controversial director Theo van Gogh (who was himself assassinated). Even before then, her attacks on Islamic culture as "brutal, bigoted, [and] fixated on controlling women" had generated much controversy. In this suspenseful account of her life and her internal struggle with her Muslim faith, she discusses how these views were shaped by her experiences amid the political chaos of Somalia and other African nations, where she was subjected to genital mutilation and later forced into an unwanted marriage. While in transit to her husband in Canada, she decided to seek asylum in the Netherlands, where she marveled at the polite policemen and government bureaucrats. Ali is up-front about having lied about her background in order to obtain her citizenship, which led to further controversy in early 2006, when an immigration official sought to deport her and triggered the collapse of the Dutch coalition government. Apart from feelings of guilt over van Gogh's death, her voice is forceful and unbowed—like Irshad Manji, she delivers a powerful feminist critique of Islam informed by a genuine understanding of the religion. 8-page photo insert. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

The Trouble with Islam Today: A Muslim's Call for Reform in Her Faith (Paperback)
by Irshad Manji (Author)

Editorial Reviews
Amazon.com
This "call for reform" reads like an open letter to the Muslim world. Irshad Manji, a Toronto-based television journalist, was born to Muslim parents in South Africa. Her family eventually fled to Canada when she was two years old. Manji shares her life experiences growing up in a Western Muslim household and ask some compelling questions from her feminist-lesbian-journalist perspective. It is interesting to note that Manji has been lambasted for being too personal and not scholarly enough to have a worthwhile opinion. Yet her lack of pretense and her intimate narrative are the strengths of this book. For Muslims to dismiss her opinions as not worthy to bring to the table is not only elitist; it underscores why she feels compelled to speak out critically. Intolerance for dissent, especially women's dissent, is one of her main complaints about Islam. Clearly, her goal was not to write a scholarly critique, but rather to speak from her heartfelt concern about Islam. To her fellow Muslims she writes:
I hear from a Saudi friend that his country's religious police arrest women for wearing red on Valentines Day, and I think, Since when does a merciful God outlaw joy—or fun? I read about victims of **** being stoned for "adultery" and I wonder how a critical mass of us can stay stone silent.​
She asks tough questions: "What's with the stubborn streak of anti-Semitism in Islam? Who is the real colonizer of the Muslims—-America or Arabia? Why are we squandering the talents of women, fully half of God's creation?" This is not an anti-Muslim rant. Manji also speaks with passionate love and hope for Islam, believing that democracy is compatible with its purest doctrine. Sure, she's biased and opinionated. But all religions, from Christianity to Buddhism to Islam should be accountable for how their leadership and national allegiances personally affect their followers. One would hope that this honest voice be met with a little more self-scrutiny and a little less anti-personal, anti-feminine, and anti-Western rhetoric. --Gail Hudson --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
 

nikoloslvy

I wear my sunglasses at night...Anyone want fries?
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