So AntH Finally Wrote a Book...

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
I’ve been thinking about what you said earlier about me calling you a basement troll, It occurred to me, trailers don’t have basements.
A vaudeville hook should drag you out of your house and into a volcano.
 

Foggy

I'm wasting my life here
Donator
Stop mocking him! He worked for a living! Past tense!
We spent a whole 30 years in the workforce. You hear that? THIRTY. We whippersnappers don't know nothing but hard work, paying your dues and voting for Obama... you know, conservative Republican stuff.
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
We spent a whole 30 years in the workforce. You hear that? THIRTY. We whippersnappers don't know nothing but hard work, paying your dues and voting for Obama... you know, conservative Republican stuff.
You don’t know shit
 

Stig

Make America Gay Again.
That's how one of my favorite political writers, Kevin A. Carson, does his thing, except instead of Kindle he puts his books up online for free in PDF form.
Not gonna lie. That's not very impressive. Lol

Sent from my LGUS997 using Tapatalk
 

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Not gonna lie. That's not very impressive. Lol
It's not supposed to be impressive, it's supposed to be easy for new readers to acquire while remaining outside of the typical IP- and mass (over)production-based capitalist model of publishing, which Kevin is a staunch opponent of. He discussed this once while talking about the supposed threat of piracy to content creators in a research paper he wrote for the Center for a Stateless Society (C4SS) about how progressives, despite their anti-corporate rhetoric, strongly favor large-scale centralized, bureaucratic, corporate models of business in almost everything. I posted an excerpt of it in the "Interesting Quotes" thread, but here it is again for your convenience.
"Despite [Astra]Taylor's fears that content creators won't be paid, I think the truth is far closer to Tim O'Reilly's observation that for the little guy, obscurity is a lot bigger danger than 'piracy.'⁸⁶ I suspect a lot of the critics are pretty unimaginative when it comes to thinking of alternative ways for content creators to monetize their products.

All they’re thinking of is the stuff the proprietary content companies can’t charge money for to pay content creators. They’re not thinking of the new possibilities opened up by all the things that content creators can now do for themselves, at virtually zero cost, that formerly only a highly capitalized record or publishing company could do for them. Their entire view of the world is still shaped by a time when publishing, or producing and selling records, required capital assets costing many millions of dollars, and the way to make money from music or writing was to convince some such giant company that your work was worth producing and marketing.

I'm sure the overall revenue pie is a lot smaller. But that's offset to a significant extent by a reduction in the share of total revenue previously absorbed by recording studios and corporate marketing operations that are now within the means of the artists themselves. This is borne out by figures for the years 2004-2008, which show that while total music revenues in the UK fell from 1.067 million pounds to .782 million pounds, total payments to artists actually rose.⁸⁷

But even assuming that 'piracy'' really does cut into the total revenues of the little guy who’s trying to make a full-time career out of music or writing, that’s looking at only one side of the picture. It neglects what Bastiat called 'the unseen.'⁸⁸ What revenue does come in to artists follows a much longer tail distribution, spread out among a larger number of people making small amounts of money, as opposed to larger amounts being concentrated in the hands of a smaller number of artists.

Let’s consider my case. I don’t waste time worrying about the sharing of pdf files of my books at torrent sites, or how much money it’s costing me. To me, the proper basis for comparison is the money I still can make that I never could have made at all in the 'good old days.' In the good old days, I’d have painstakingly put together a manuscript of hundreds of pages, and then put it away to gather cobwebs when I couldn’t persuade the gatekeepers at a conventional publisher that it was worth the cost of printing and marketing. Never mind whether online file-sharing’s costing me money (I don’t think it is–I believe the ebooks are more like free advertising). More importantly, if it weren’t for digital publishing technologies and free publishing venues on the Internet, I would probably have lived and died doing menial labor with nobody anywhere ever hearing of my ideas. If I'd had to persuade a conventional publisher that my books could sell ten thousand copies before I could be heard, my entire writing career would have been confined to letters to the editor. Thanks to digital culture, I’m able to make my work directly available to anyone in the world who has an Internet connection, and market it virally to a niche readership at virtually no cost. If only a tiny fraction of the people who can read it for free decide to buy it, that's still enough to give me a few thousand dollars a year in royalties (my stipend for writing for Center for a Stateless Society, some freelance articles for The Freeman and my book royalties together netted about $7,000 last year), which is a few thousand more than I would have received in the 'good old days' when my manuscripts would have yellowed in an attic.

For people like me, writing may not be a 'job,' but it serves a function much like access to the commons three hundred years ago: it provides supplemental income and reduces my short-term dependence on the job. My writing has enabled me to pay off my debts and to accumulate 'go to hell money,' so that even if I can't do without a job for an extended period of time, I am at least in a better bargaining position.

For every small full-time musician or writer who has a harder time scraping by, and may have to supplement his performing revenues with a day job, I suspect there are ten people like me who would have spent their entire lives as (if you’ll pardon the expression) mute inglorious Miltons, without ever making a single penny from their music or writing, but who can now be heard. And for every blockbuster writer or musician, who has a few million shaved off his multi-million dollar revenues as a result of online 'piracy,' I suspect there are probably a hundred or a thousand people like me."

— Kevin A. Carson, "Thermidor of the Progressives - Managerialist Liberalism’s Hostility to Decentralized Organization" - Center for a Stateless Society Paper No. 9 (Second Quarter 2010)

Carson's footnotes:
86 Tim O'Reilly, “Piracy is Progressive Taxation,” O'Reilly Radar, August 4, 2006 <http://radar.oreilly.com/2006/08/piracy- is-progressive-taxation.html>

87 “Do music artists fare better in a world with illegal file-sharing?” Times Online Labs Blog, November 12, 2009 <http://labs.timesonline.co.uk/blog/...-better-in-a-world-with-illegal-file-sharing/>.

88 Frédéric Bastiat, “What is Seen and What is Not Seen,” Selected Essays on Political Economy (1848) <http://www.econlib.org/library/Bastiat/basEss1.html>.
 
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DiggerNick

Well-Known Member
Donator
At least all our prime ministers have been white.
There was a very brief, regrettable period where one of them was a female ginger. But we prefer to pretend that never happened.
 

Foggy

I'm wasting my life here
Donator
There was a very brief, regrettable period where one of them was a female ginger. But we prefer to pretend that never happened.
At least Gillard wasn't actually voted in by the public. Good lord.
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$

Interesting side note, google “aboriginal women” then click “traditional” oddly its a page of stunningly beautiful girls that are maybe 1/10th “of color”
Fucking google is definitely fucking with the search algorithm
 
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