Styrofoam in the microwave.

Dicktator

I need a Vacation
Feb 11, 2006
3,839
995
593
Michigan
#1
Here at my restaurant i put a biscuit in a styrofoam box to heat it up and my line cook yells from across the kitchen "you're going to get poisoned" . I then tried to explain thats whay you get togo food in styrofoam cause its perfectly safe to reheat in. 2 others out of 9 here believe its actually dangerous.
 
Jul 13, 2006
12,836
1
0
Arkansas
#2
Here at my restaurant i put a biscuit in a styrofoam box to heat it up and my line cook yells from across the kitchen "you're going to get poisoned" . I then tried to explain thats whay you get togo food in styrofoam cause its perfectly safe to reheat in. 2 others out of 9 here believe its actually dangerous.
So, I guess all of us that have thrown those Ramen Noodle instant cups in the microwave before are going to die, right?
 

Cunt Smasher

Caligula Jr.
Aug 26, 2005
13,452
4,052
628
#3
I seen this somewhere and thought it was cute..."Styrofoam doesn't grow on trees,it's a root!"
 

Mommadeez4u

Bastard coated bastard w/ bastard filling
Mar 26, 2005
4,039
909
608
Washington, DC
#4
If styrofoam burns it releases something called 'styrene monomer' which is, yeah, one of the most carcinogenic substances known. I think the plastic container food comes in (like fast food burgers) is not that type of plastic, though.
 
Jul 13, 2006
12,836
1
0
Arkansas
#5
If styrofoam burns it releases something called 'styrene monomer' which is, yeah, one of the most carcinogenic substances known. I think the plastic container food comes in (like fast food burgers) is not that type of plastic, though.
But it has to be exposed to an open flame. It would take a lot to actually set it on fire inside of a microwave. It mostly just melts.
 

burky79

62 75 72 6b 79 37 39
Feb 18, 2005
4,341
0
236
in a house
#7
what about soup in those styro bowls?

is there a small amount released into the liquid of the soup and then drank/ate?

i am far from a chemist, but i would think something bad gets in liquid, from the styro, wehn heated up in a micro.
 

Glenn Dandy

THE ONLY WHITE PRESIDENT LEFT.
Mar 21, 2005
19,758
35
298
Wackbag Whitehouse.
#8
If I had to guess. It probably aint good for you.

but i ve done it.. no choice i dont own plates.
 

Party Rooster

Unleash The Beast
Apr 27, 2005
40,284
7,454
438
The Inland Empire State
#11
No offense, Kris but WikiAnswers sucks. I remember Consumer Reports doing a story on this a while back and don't have a subscription now, but I managed to copypaste copypaste from other places what I remember:

Plastic used for containers can be identified by their recycling codes, as listed below. Most wraps on pre-packaged foods lack identifying symbols [so assume they are not good for the microwave]:

1. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PETE or PET): No known hazards.

2. High Density Polyethylene (HDPE): No known hazards.

3. Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC or vinyl): Plasticizers are added to many PVC products to make them flexible. These include phthalates -- suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), DEHA, another possible EDC, was found to leach from PVC cling wraps into cheese. Grocery stores commonly use PVC to wrap deli meats and cheeses. Reynolds cling wrap is PVC. Some waters and vegetable oils are bottled in PVC. Ad PVC's manufacture and incineration produces highly toxic dioxins, as does the PVDC used in Saran Wrap, according to Consumers Union.

4. Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE): No known hazards.

5. Polypropylene (PP): No known hazards.

6. Polystyrene (PS or Styrofoam): Made from styrene, a suspected carcinogen, PS also contains p-nonylphenol; both chemicals are suspected EDCs. Do not consume fatty foods or alcoholic beverages from Styrofoam containers; styrene can leach into these substances. Some opaque plastic cutlery is PS, as well.

7. Other Resins, including Polycarbonate (PC): Most clear plastic baby bottles and 5-gallon water bottles are made of PC. Bisphenol-A EDC is in PC, and has been found in water and heated infant formulas bottles in PC, as well as food cans lined with a plastic film.
Polystyrene. Polystyrene, labeled as #6, is often found
in foam containers and cups and sometimes in clear disposable takeout containers, plastic cutlery, and cups. Polystyrene may leach styrene, a possible human carcinogen, into food it comes in contact with. Studies involving mice show that when it’s ingested over several weeks, this chemical can damage the liver, kidneys, lungs, and brain.
My advice:
• Avoid consuming hot liquids, fatty foods, or alcoholic drinks from Styrofoam containers, since heat and alcohol may increase leaching of the chemical.

• Transfer foods from takeout containers made of Styrofoam to glass or ceramic.
But consumers should stay tuned. Other modern plastics are under scrutiny, including polyvinyl chloride, polycarbonate and plasticizers --chemicals that make plastics pliable and soft. In the microwave, some chemicals may migrate into food, especially fatty food cooked at high temperatures.

Some plasticizers emit hormone-mimicking substances called endocrine disrupters, which are now being examined for potential links to birth defects, cancer or fertility problems. Though animal and population studies haven't proved causation, "they're on the radar screen," says John Brock of the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. And, he notes, "These compounds are ubiquitous." Plasticizers are used in everything from medical supplies and cosmetics, to toys and teething rings.
Dr. Edward Fujimoto, manager of the Wellness Program at Castle Hospital, was on TV talking about dioxins and how bad they are for us. He said that we should not be heating fatty foods in the microwave using plastic containers. He said that the combination of fat, high heat and plastics releases dioxin into the food and ultimately into the cells of the body. Dioxin are carcinogens and highly toxic. Instead, he recommends using glass, Corning Ware, or ceramic containers for heating food. So such things as TV dinners, instant ramen and soups, etc., should be removed from the container and heated in something else. Paper isn't bad but you don't know what is in the paper. To add to this: saran wrap placed over foods as they are nuked, with the high heat, actually drips poisonous toxins into the food. Don't freeze your plastic water bottles with water as this also releases dioxin in the plastic
What to Do?
At a minimum, consumers should:

* Cook only in containers labeled for use in the microwave. Better yet, choose glass or glass ceramic (e.g. Corningware) for microwaving.
* Use a paper towel to cover food heated in the microwave and avoid using plastic wrap. At the very least, if you microwave using plastic wrap, don't let the plastic wrap touch the food.
* Rewrap deli cheese and meats in a polyethylene wrap, such as Glad Wrap. Better yet, use aluminum foil or waxed paper.
* Don't use recycled margarine tubs, dairy food containers or styrofoam containers in the microwave.
* Remove meat, poultry or fish from butcher trays and cling wraps before defrosting. Better yet, repackage meats once you are home from the grocery in butcher paper or freezer paper.
* Don't reuse plastic trays containing microwavable entrees.