Thanksgiving's coming - who frys turkeys?

Sinn Fein

Infidel and White Interloper
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Aug 29, 2002
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#1
After being introduced to fried turkey a few years back, there is no way I will ever eat mummified oven-cooked turkey ever again.

In the past my brother came up with his fryer and we did it all up. This year, I am buying my own fryer and we're going to do it ourselves.

In the past, we used beer, orange juice, and 7-up as marinades before.

Anyone have suggestions as to marinades/seasonings? Other tips?
 

Turtle

WACKBAGGER
Jun 8, 2005
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#2
i do the fry on the bird.

Make sure you have no ice or water on the bird and cover the LP hose from the tank to the pot in foil
 

Sinn Fein

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#3
I was reading your Chili thread and am intrigued by the Peach Snapple... Wondering about using it as a marinade.
 

Cybouncer

Not Fat, Big Boned!
Feb 26, 2006
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#5
I use a nice Butter Creole seasoning.

I inject it the night before and fry the bird up about an hour before we're planning on eating.

Nothing beats Fried Bird!
 

Turtle

WACKBAGGER
Jun 8, 2005
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#6
Sinn Fein I'm an ass, you posted in that same thread last year.
 

NikkorTheMonk

Registered User
Apr 26, 2005
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#7
Curious. Peanut oil or regular corn oil for frying? We use a smoker for good 6 hours or so and finish it up in the oven for our turkey. Some people were frying a turkey at the last football game i went to and it was insanly delicious. They were also using a butter creole injector, the other turkey was a garlic butter parsely mixture. But they were packets of mixture which seemed ok. Kinda like a McCormicks mix or something similar.
 

Turtle

WACKBAGGER
Jun 8, 2005
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#8
peanut oil, a better smoke point
 

Turtle

WACKBAGGER
Jun 8, 2005
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#9
Brine is a solution of salt and liquid with an extremely high salinity content. It has been used historically in food production as a preservative, since salt inhibits the growth of bacteria. Brine can also be used as a marinade for meats before they are roasted, grilled, smoked, baked, or broiled. Brined meat is more tender and flavorful, as well as moist, and many cooks greatly enjoy experimenting with brining.

A wet brine typically uses water and salt, although other liquids such as fruit juices can be used as well. The salt content in the brine should be high enough to float a raw egg. Food can also be dry brined in pure salt, although this technique tends to be used more for preservation than marinating. In addition to salt, a brine can be mixed with an assortment of herbs and spices for flavor.


When used as a marinade, brine serves several functions. The first is as a tenderizer, because the brine begins to break down the cellular structure of meats. It also infuses the meat with water, since the high salinity forces the brine into the cells of the meat. When the brine pushes into the meat, it also brings the spices in the mixture along with it, concentrating the marinade inside the meat. As the brined meat cooks, it stays moist and tender, and develops more flavor.

To use brine as a marinade, plan on two hours of marination for every pound (half kilogram) of meat. You will need to completely submerge the meat in the brine, and it should also be kept cool through the marination process. The brine mixture will require one cup of salt for every gallon (3.8 liters) of water or fluid. Most cooks prefer to dissolve the salt in boiling water before adding it to the liquid, making sure that the liquid is cooled before it is poured over the meat. If you want a crispy skin after cooking, as is often the case with poultry, pull the meat out of the brine several hours before you plan to cook it, so that the flesh can absorb the moisture from the skin, leaving it dry so that it will crisp well during cooking.
 

FAZ8218

Good eeeeeeeevening.
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Feb 10, 2006
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#11
How come I've never heard of this? Someone please invite me over...
 

Kris_LTRMa

LoseTheRadio.net's Ma
Nov 17, 2006
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#13
Make that x3 on the invite.

I had a fried turkey two Thanksgivings ago, but I think my sister's father-in-law did something wrong because it was really greasy and tasted ... well ... it tasted fried.
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
Aug 23, 2002
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#14
ive done 3, the first one i fucked up buy removeing the probe and re setting it two many times it dried the bird out, the second time i left the probe in place we also brined the bird and it was a fresh bird, the third time i did it i only did the breast, and brined it. the breast turned out the best but the second bird wasnt bad, to me its a huge waste of oil so i dont bother (yea i know that you can re use the oil) i want to smoke a bird but im just too lazy and my wife wont eat it
 

NikkorTheMonk

Registered User
Apr 26, 2005
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#15
$75 for five gallons of decent grade peanut oil. Just a wee bit pricy for one time shot. Unless it keeps, but I'm guessing it doesn't.
 

Sinn Fein

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#16
You can re-use the peanut oil over and over. My brother buys it at a local restaurant supply place it doesn't cost anywhere near $75 for 5-gallons. I forget the exact price, but I know he is able to buy two 5-gallon jugs for significantly less than $100 Occasionally they have it on sale and that's when he buys a few jugs of it.

According to the Texas Peanut Producers Board: Peanut oil may be used three or four times to fry turkeys before signs of deterioration begin. Such indications include foaming, darkening or smoking excessively, indicating the oil must be discarded. Other signs of deteriorated oil include a rancid smell and/or failure to bubble when food is added.
He's got a little pump with a filter for pumping the oil back into the jug from the fryer after it's cooled down (overnight). He usually can do 4 turkeys with each batch of oil.
 

NikkorTheMonk

Registered User
Apr 26, 2005
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#17
Well that would make sence, i have no idea how much it takes to run a fryer. Five gallons is alot it seem, but it would break down to about $15 to $17 a gallon, that of decent grade again. Im sure it's cheaper in some places, that was just a quick internet search.
 

Sinn Fein

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#19
You only need a few gallons. It depens on the size of the bird. There's a procedure for measuring the amount of oil you will need. Basically you do a test run with the turkey in the pot and fill it with water instead of oil. You record how much water you needed to completely cover the bird, and that's the amount of oil you'll need.

My brother has gotten to the point where he made a "fill" mark on his pot and fills it to the same spot every time. He always buys the same size turkeys (15-17 lbs) to keep it consist ent.
 

Sinn Fein

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#21
I saw that, but it's probably not quite the same...

I bet it beats oven-cooking, though.
 

Gladys kravitz

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Dec 2, 2006
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#23
I usually slow melt butter with chopped up garlic(several cloves) and season it will creole seasoning and old bay. Inject while its still warm and then let it sit for a hour or so. Cornish hens also work well in the fryer. Also Sams club sells peanut oil for a cheaper price.
 

Glenn Dandy

THE ONLY WHITE PRESIDENT LEFT.
Mar 21, 2005
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#24
those things make me a nervous wreck around the kids... imo not worth the danger factor if theres lil ones around.