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The Plan To Bring The Passenger Pigeon Back From Extinction

Discussion in 'Science, Math, History and Language Studies' started by mr. sin, Mar 21, 2013.

  1. mr. sin

    mr. sin Registered User

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    http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/03/passenger-pigeon-de-extinction/


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    Twelve birds lie belly-up in a wooden drawer at the Berkeley Museum of Vertebrate Zoology. Bloated with stuffing, their ruddy brown chests resemble a row of sweet potatoes. Slate-blue heads and thin white tails protrude in perfect alignment, except for one bird that cranes its neck to face its neighbor. A pea-sized bulge of white cotton sits where its eye should be. A slip of paper tied to its foot reads, “Ectopistes migratorius. Manitoba. 1884.” This is the passenger pigeon, once the most abundant bird in North America. When Europeans first landed on the continent, they encountered billions of the birds. By 1914 they were extinct.
    That may be about to change. Today scientists are meeting in Washington, D.C. to discuss a plan to bring the passenger pigeon back from extinction. The technical challenges are immense, and the ethical questions are slippery. But as genetic technology races ahead, a scenario that’s hard to imagine is becoming harder to dismiss out of hand.
    About 1,500 passenger pigeons inhabit museum collections. They are all that’s left of a species once perceived as a limitless resource. The birds were shipped in boxcars by the tons, sold as meat for 31 cents per dozen, and plucked for mattress feathers. But in a mere 25 years, the population shrank from billions to thousands as commercial hunters decimated nesting flocks. Martha, the last living bird, took her place under museum glass in 1914.
    Ben Novak doesn’t believe the story should end there. The 26-year-old genetics student is convinced that new technology can bring the passenger pigeon back to life. “This whole idea that extinction is forever is just nonsense,” he says. Novak spent the last five years working to decipher the bird’s genes, and now he has put his graduate studies on hold to pursue a goal he’d once described in a junior high school fair presentation: de-extinction.
    Novak is not alone in his mission. An organization called Revive and Restore is enlisting the support of preeminent scientists—and even the National Geographic Society, which is hosting the TEDx meeting on the topic today, to investigate putting the passenger pigeon back in the sky. The group has chosen Novak to spearhead the project.


    When the bird from the Berkeley drawer flew over Manitoba in 1884, it didn’t travel alone. Passenger pigeons were named for their passage up and down eastern North America in flocks several hundred million strong. To sustain long, strenuous flights, the birds devoured forests and left destruction in their wake. Ornithologist J.M. Wheaton described one flock as a rolling cylinder filled with leaves and grass. “The noise was deafening and the sight confusing to the mind,” he wrote in 1882. It was easy to tell where the pigeons had roosted: The trees were crippled, their branches cracked off and picked clean of nuts and acorns. For miles, the ground was coated with a layer of feces more than an inch thick.

    But the same flocking behavior also led to the bird’s demise. Their nesting sites in the northeastern U.S. were densely packed—as many as 100 nests per tree, each containing a single egg. Pigeon hatchlings were a smorgasbord for predators. Each helpless lump of fat, as heavy as its parents but lacking their aerial skill, would wallow in the nest for a day, then flutter to the ground.
    Even before Europeans arrived, hunters shot nests with arrows or knocked them down with poles. But in the mid 19th century, the railroad and the telegraph turned the pigeon into a national commodity. Professional trackers followed the flocks and descended on nest sites. Their tactics were brutal and effective: Firing into the trees brought down thousands of birds in one afternoon. Setting a match to the combustible birch bark forced terrified chicks to fling themselves from their nests. By the late 1850s, flocks were shrinking. By 1889, the population was in the thousands.
    Novak remembers learning about the pigeon in school. “I just fell in love with the story of it,” he said. “This absolutely bigger-than-life story of the most abundant bird on the planet going extinct so quickly.” But he wasn’t convinced that animals like the passenger pigeon were gone forever. “I thought that was too absolute.”
    As a student at Montana State University Novak studied ecology and evolution with the hope of bringing back extinct animals, but his focus soon shifted toward more modest population studies. “You’re kind of steered away from the science fiction when you go to school,” he says. When he started graduate school at the Ancient DNA Center of McMaster University in Ontario, Novak hoped to analyze genes from the bird that had captivated him as a kid. All he needed were samples from a museum specimen.
     
  2. Norm Stansfield

    Norm Stansfield 私は亀が好きだ。

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    Why not just take regular pigeons, and paint them orange and blue? Same difference.
     
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  3. ShooterMcGavin

    ShooterMcGavin Go back to your shanties.

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    Slippery slope...


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  4. whiskeyguy

    whiskeyguy PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.

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    I'm assuming these people believe in evolution, so why are they trying to fuck with it?
     
  5. Guilty Spark

    Guilty Spark It's freeing and refreshing

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    Can we get the Moa going too? And why now Steller's sea cow while we're at it.
     
  6. Cunt Smasher

    Cunt Smasher Caligula Jr.

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    What could possibly go wrong?
     
  7. Norm Stansfield

    Norm Stansfield 私は亀が好きだ。

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    The best scenario here is that they're successful, and then we'll be walking around in an inch of pigeon shit all over again like those poor, poor people in the 19th century. It's like wanting to revive the plague.
     
  8. Ballbuster1

    Ballbuster1 In The Danger Zone...
    Wackbag Staff

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    Really. Who the fuck wants to revive another flying shit factory?

    Bring back the cool shit like saber toothed tigers.
     
  9. BIV

    BIV I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.

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    Depends, are they yummy?
     
  10. mills

    mills I'll give em a state, a state of unconsciousness

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    I'd gamble with the global genome for the chance to hunt an aurochs. Those things were huge! Like Flintstones sized steaks and lots of them. It sucks that if you want to hunt you have to settle for giant freezers loaded full of venison.
     
  11. gleet

    gleet What's black and white and red all over?

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    [​IMG]
     
  12. BIV

    BIV I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.

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    Fuck yeah. Bring back the moa too. Cattle sized game birds.
     
  13. Norm Stansfield

    Norm Stansfield 私は亀が好きだ。

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  14. BIV

    BIV I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.

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  15. Neckbeard

    Neckbeard I'm Team Piggy!

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    Weren't these things systematically exterminated to the point of extinction because they were nuisances almost beyond any comprehension?

    Why bring these Douchebag Birds back?
     
  16. Cunt Smasher

    Cunt Smasher Caligula Jr.

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    I'm thinking reality show, let loose a bunch of young people with their gats into a walled off game preserve with sabre toothed tigers, and maybe a couple other surprises. Like "survivor" meets jurassic park.
     
  17. OilyJillFart

    OilyJillFart Well-Lubed Member

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    I'd like to bring back some of the people who were dedicated to getting rid of those hideous sounding things so they could kick the shit out of the morons that want to ruin their efforts and bring them back.
    We'd probably be so stupid as to release them into the wild and protect them until they got to be just as big of a problem as they were before.

    Although a billion birds dropping an inch of shit from DC to Boston might be fun to watch..
     
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  18. BIV

    BIV I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.

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    No, they were hunted to extinction because they were yummy and easy to kill. That and we destroyed a lot of habitat. Think of them as flying buffalo.
     
  19. Neckbeard

    Neckbeard I'm Team Piggy!

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    I heard they flew around shitting all over the place. I just imagined dandies shooting nets out of cannons at them and then whacking them with canes and umbrellas while saying "Pip pip cheerio, take that, you blighter!"
     
  20. DR. Jimcy M.E.

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  21. Atomic Fireball

    Atomic Fireball Well-Known Member
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    Pretty soon with those recombo DNA labs we'll be makin' raccoon lads and bubble-eyed dog boys
     

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