(Thermal levels on a video card, your thoughts.)

Bobobie

Registered User
Oct 1, 2005
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#1
I bought an HD4850 a few years ago, and it always seemed to run a little too hot, but had no real issues until I started noticing artifacts, sparkles, and snow effects while gaming. I pulled the card and popped off the heat sink and fan and noticed that there was barely any thermal past on it. Most of the time, you have to almost chisel the stuff off, but was only on several spots and didn't even have the right consistency to smear. I put some Arctic Silver on it and the gaming seems to be okay now. I ran Minecraft with 64 bit textures and don't see any snowy sparkles anymore. It was running at 70c idle and nearly 80c gaming, now it's 60c at idle and 63C gaming. Does this still seem a little hot? Maybe the old thermal paste cooked off? Anyone try any after market coolers?

I'm kind of worried about stressing this card too much, maybe it's already been damaged some from being stressed so long with crappy cooling. Can't really afford another graphics card right now
 

mrbucket75

Registered User
Jan 9, 2009
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#2
Yes, I modded an HD4670 with an Artic Cooler. But I eventually had fitting issues, upgraded to http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835118070
The card is dated for sure, gonna be hard to find aftermarket stuff. Most newer cards have alot to offer, and much cheaper, probably slightly more than ordering new parts.
 
Apr 30, 2011
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CLT
#3
I looked that chipset up and people are saying keep it under 90c and you should be ok. Properly applied thermal paste by hand is never a bad thing, less really is more with thermal compound. The artic silver stuff is also great at filling voids on the heatsink metal too. The change in numbers shows you did good +3 degrees vs +10 degrees under load.

Aftermarket coolers really shouldn't be necessary unless overclocking or you have a weird situation where you need to replace an exotic fan.
 
Dec 12, 2007
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#4
Aftermarket coolers really shouldn't be necessary unless overclocking or you have a weird situation where you need to replace an exotic fan.
Or the card itself naturally runs a bit hotter then it should. I had that happen with an old radeon and I had to keep the case open or the fan would speed up so much I thought the dam system would melt.
 

Bobobie

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Oct 1, 2005
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#5
It seems to stay right at 61C once it warms up and runs the game for a while. Two hours of gaming and it seems to be okay.
 

Dikbag

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Dec 11, 2004
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#6
This is why people like console gaming, nobody's got time for this shit.
 
Dec 12, 2007
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#7
This is why people like console gaming, nobody's got time for this shit.
I've been a PC gamer for 10+ years and had one bad video card (bad because it was a little noisy) in that whole time. These aren't major issues, my old launch Xbox made more noise.
 

Bobobie

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Oct 1, 2005
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#8
I'm still kind of paranoid about how hot this thing runs at idle. My old fanless Geforce 8600 only had a giant heatsink and it ran in the low to mid 50's at idle. If found this on Amazon and people have bought this and cobbled an 80mm fan to it.
It's only $9, free shipping with prime.
 
Apr 30, 2011
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CLT
#9
When I looked into this chipset the other day people were hitting sustained peak temps of over 90-100c before running into issues. You seemed to fix it considering 63c is FAR below that. Its also unfair to compare one chipset to another. How hot is the room you are in now considering it is winter and generally the heat is on. Ambient room temperature is a big factor when trying to cool a component via air cooling. When I was messing around with overclocking my CPU I found I could push it almost 20% harder downstairs where it is cooler than my upstairs.

If you already have the fan/s you may want to experiment with trying to blow air across the card or even right onto the back of the PCB. Newer cases have various ways to put fans for blowing across the cards. Not saying you should buy a new case but if you can float a fan in place to see if it helps that will give you an idea.
 

Bobobie

Registered User
Oct 1, 2005
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#12
I think I'm going get something like that for my next Video card. I think having a giant heatsink works much better than the single card slot with the fan.
 

GrammatonCleric

Registered User
Nov 19, 2008
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#13
you are way safe at that temp...don't even worry about it. I love my AXP-140 heat sink in my HTPC

I'm thinking of a scythe kozuti for a build I'm gonna be doing soon. Is yours completely passive, or can a fan be mounted?
 
Jun 30, 2005
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outsiddah Boston
#14
i had both a 140mm fan and a 120mm fan and tested them both blowing down....The 140mm was too obstructed...the 120mm works great, and slides into the lower 2 notches so it gets an extra few mm of clearance on top. But I am sure it could work passive w. low cpu usage...but it would probably need some sort of mild air movement.