Those who use the intertubes the most suck at it

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
78,636
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Seattle
#1
Left in the commentary:

Yet another study shows that “digital natives” suck at searching

Posted on August 22, 2011 by Lisa Gold| 8 Comments
I’ve blogged before about studies showing that so-called “digital natives” lack basic information literacy skills and have great difficulty doing academic research and finding and evaluating sources. (My two posts on Project Information Literacy studies are here and here.)
This Inside Higher Ed article reported today on the results of new studies by the ERIAL (Ethnographic Research in Illinois Academic Libraries) Project. Here’s an excerpt, but you should read the whole thing:
“The majority of students — of all levels — exhibited significant difficulties that ranged across nearly every aspect of the search process,” according to researchers there. They tended to overuse Google and misuse scholarly databases. They preferred simple database searches to other methods of discovery, but generally exhibited “a lack of understanding of search logic” that often foiled their attempts to find good sources….
The most alarming finding in the ERIAL studies was perhaps the most predictable: when it comes to finding and evaluating sources in the Internet age, students are downright lousy….
The prevalence of Google in student research is well-documented, but the Illinois researchers found something they did not expect: students were not very good at using Google. They were basically clueless about the logic underlying how the search engine organizes and displays its results. Consequently, the students did not know how to build a search that would return good sources. (For instance, limiting a search to news articles, or querying specific databases such as Google Book Search or Google Scholar.)
Duke and Asher said they were surprised by “the extent to which students appeared to lack even some of the most basic information literacy skills that we assumed they would have mastered in high school.” Even students who were high achievers in high school suffered from these deficiencies…
In other words: Today’s college students might have grown up with the language of the information age, but they do not necessarily know the grammar.
“I think it really exploded this myth of the ‘digital native,’ ” Asher said. “Just because you’ve grown up searching things in Google doesn’t mean you know how to use Google as a good research tool.”
Even when students turned to more scholarly resources, that did not necessarily solve the problem. Many seemed confused about where in the constellation of library databases they should turn to locate sources for their particular research topic: Half wound up using databases a librarian “would most likely never recommend for their topic.”…
Years of conditioning on Google had not endowed the Illinois Wesleyan students with any searching savvy to speak of, but rather had instilled them with a stunted understanding of how to finely tune a search in order to home in on usable sources, concluded the ERIAL researchers.
Regardless of the advanced-search capabilities of the database they were querying, “Students generally treated all search boxes as the equivalent of a Google search box, and searched ‘Google-style,’ using the ‘any word anywhere’ keyword as a default,” they wrote. Out of the 30 students Duke and Asher observed doing research, 27 failed to narrow their search criteria at all when doing so would have turned up more helpful returns.
Unsurprisingly, students using this method got either too many search results or too few. Frequently, students would be so discouraged they would change their research topic to something more amenable to a simple search….
Duke and Asher noted: “Students showed an almost complete lack of interest in seeking assistance from librarians during the search process.” Of all the students they observed — many of whom struggled to find good sources, to the point of despair — not one asked a librarian for help.
In a separate study of students…, other ERIAL researchers deduced several possible reasons for this. The most basic was that students were just as unaware of the extent of their own information illiteracy as everyone else.
How are students supposed to acquire these important digital and information literacy skills if they aren’t being taught in schools, many parents and teachers lack these skills themselves, and the librarians who have the skills are ignored or fired as libraries close in record numbers?
 

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
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Atlanta, GA
#2
That's not surprising. Most students on the Internet can't write either.
 

SOS

ONA
Wackbag Staff
Aug 14, 2000
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USA
#5
I can understand why this is. My theory is that most teachers and parents probably don't know how to use the internets very well and therefore their charges cannot learn from them. So therefore it takes years of trial and error for the generation growing up with a strong internet presence.
 
Jun 2, 2005
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Dallas
#6
I can understand why this is. My theory is that most teachers and parents probably don't know how to use the internets very well and therefore their charges cannot learn from them. So therefore it takes years of trial and error for the generation growing up with a strong internet presence.
Ayup.

Honestly, until the generation that are mostly teenagers now become the age to be college professors there's not going to be a broad education on computers and the internet.

My wife's the VP of a large company's IT department, and her 22 year old little brother has been teaching us shit about computers since he was 12. He just knows it instinctively like teenagers in the 70s knew how to rebuild their car engines.