Tiny case fan

Bobobie

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Oct 1, 2005
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#1
I want to stuff it inside a Router. It has to be tiny thin and quiet. The variety I have is either too loud are the xtra speed control stuff gets in the way. Any suggestions?

No sledge pictures please.
 
Apr 30, 2011
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#3
What kind of dimensions? Have you proved that a fan will accomplish what you want it to? If you are trying to keep a processor cool you may find properly applied heatsink compound and a good heatsink will often be WAY more efficient.

Tiny + quiet = not really effective.
 

weeniewawa

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May 21, 2005
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#4
I doubt you would ever fine a fan that will even fit in a router

they're all made with swoopy doopy cases now that make it look like there is little space left
 

Sinn Fein

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#5
The easiest solution is to sit the router on one of those laptop coolers with the fans in it.
 

Bobobie

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#6
The easiest solution is to sit the router on one of those laptop coolers with the fans in it.
That's not a bad idea. If anything, I could yank the fan out of one.

What kind of dimensions? Have you proved that a fan will accomplish what you want it to? If you are trying to keep a processor cool you may find properly applied heatsink compound and a good heatsink will often be WAY more efficient.

Tiny + quiet = not really effective.
About the size of a compact flash card, but twice as thick. I've seen them inside External HD cases and on low end graphic cards. I don't seen anything that small being offered as a single part. I've been reading stuff online about people fixing the problem with case fans, but the amount of work they put into modding the case is ridiculous. I don't think you need anything bigger than a tiny fan, but the large ones are more abundant. I have a dozen in my closet.
 
Apr 30, 2011
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#7
That's not a bad idea. If anything, I could yank the fan out of one.



About the size of a compact flash card, but twice as thick. I've seen them inside External HD cases and on low end graphic cards. I don't seen anything that small being offered as a single part. I've been reading stuff online about people fixing the problem with case fans, but the amount of work they put into modding the case is ridiculous. I don't think you need anything bigger than a tiny fan, but the large ones are more abundant. I have a dozen in my closet.
Have you opened it and seen what it is that is getting hot? What model router? If its a processor in there a heatsink may do better, maybe just redo the heatsink compound on it.
 

Bobobie

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#8
Yeah, It's a Cisco Linksys WRT 310. There isn't a Heat-Sink attached to any of the chips. Here is picture of the board from someone doing one of the Fan Mods. There isn't a whole to it. It's a flat oval pancake shaped box without a lot of room to mount anything inside. The only ventilation is on the bottom, which is why I turned mine upside down. That actually made it work good for more than a few hours. Now I only have to unplug it and plug it back in 1-2 times a day.

 
Apr 30, 2011
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#9
Yeah, It's a Cisco Linksys WRT 310. There isn't a Heat-Sink attached to any of the chips. Here is picture of the board from someone doing one of the Fan Mods. There isn't a whole to it. It's a flat oval pancake shaped box without a lot of room to mount anything inside. The only ventilation is on the bottom, which is why I turned mine upside down. That actually made it work good for more than a few hours. Now I only have to unplug it and plug it back in 1-2 times a day.
On your research have you found that people that did mods actually make it stable? Did you flash with different firmware which might explain that it is overclocked and thus then causing the overheating. If it were mine I would open it up and actually touch and see if any of those chips are hot or is it the radio that is overheating. You will probably find that the Samsung memory chip does not get hot.

In my experience working with electronics over the years I have seen many hack technician try to use fans to stabilize a defect. Often it was more a product of using cheaper components when doing a repair and adding fans to mask the unreliable cheap parts. Keep in mind the original manufacturer(s) NEVER had fans cooling the circuits, only passive large heatsinks. Often we would find that you could sometimes make a circuit a little more stable but it would be because a high air flow fan was used which are VERY LOUD. I think you find if you add heatsinks you will have way better results than a fan the size of a flash card. Using both will of course be the most effective.

If you need small fans these guys have them: http://www.coolerguys.com/
 

Sinn Fein

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#10
Apr 30, 2011
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#11
But, I'm inclined to think that all the fans in the world won't improve the stability and you'll still be resetting the thing all the time.
I noticed I forgot to mention that in my last post. You mentioned you unplug it to fix the issue, but if it was truly overheating than it would only makes sense that you would have to unplug for an extended period of time for it to cool down enough on its own. So if you are just doing a quick 5 second power pull than this is not an overheat issue. Besides most electronics like this fully heat up within a few min/seconds anyway, unless it is just in standby like a TV that is turned off.
 

Bobobie

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#12
The heat issue seems to be related to heavy use of this model, not just overclocking and firmware hacking. I do a lot of video streaming and downloading. When I originally had this problem it had to be reset ever few hours. Then turning it upside down so the cooling vents were on the top allowed it to function 6-8 hours, depending how much downloading and streaming I did. I cut a hole on the bottom and mounted a full size case fan and it functioned without any problem for 3 days. It was too loud for my room-mate so had to remove it. I figure it wouldn't take very large or fast fan to keep it ventilated. It's not a huge airspace inside. I think there is a Hack to add a Heatsink and Fan. I wonder if a simple block of metal without a Fan would be enough.

Yeah, I'm keeping my eyes on the sales for a replacement. This is my 3rd router in 3 years, I'd like to get at least one year out of this thing.
 
Apr 30, 2011
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#15
Do you think these might add just enough cooling to make a difference? Maybe the the two larger chips in the Picture? I've no idea what ones would get warm. They are dirt cheap.



http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p5197.m570.l1313&_nkw=23x23x10mm Passive HEATSINK Stick-On NEW&_sacat=See-All-Categories

Nothing like an ambiguous ebay listing, the title says 23mm but in the description it says 40mm??? I would bet the chips are larger than 23mm but who knows by the picture. It would be best if the heatsink completely covered the top of the chip.

Put the router under a load and touch the processors with your finger to see if they seem too hot to touch. You can lick your finger a bit in case it is screaming hot which it should NOT be (if it sizzles back off). If the chips are not hot to the touch than don't bother. Also the chips temps may differ if it is wired traffic vs wireless so test that as needed (for instance one chip may be only for wireless so it wouldn't be hot if using wired). If you can keep your finger on the chip without it getting too hot than cooling is not an issue. Of course if this was an overheating issue, you may be too late as the chip itself has started to break down. However if wasting a few bucks on these heatsinks wont break your bank they are worth a try. If you have been fixing your issues by simply unplugging briefly, than this may not be that big of a help since unplugging for a few seconds would NOT be long enough to cool them down to a reasonable temp.
 

mrfarstucker

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#16
This is my 3rd router in 3 years, I'd like to get at least one year out of this thing.
3 routers in 3 years? That seems excessive. I've had a WRT54G since ~2006, and it is still going strong. *knock on wood* And I'm pretty sure my dad is still using a WRT54G from even earlier.

It looks like this guy hacked up the case in order to install a fan and some heatsinks.
 

weeniewawa

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May 21, 2005
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#17
I have some of these fans if it would fit

here is a pic with a quarter for comparison.


 

Bobobie

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#18
3 routers in 3 years? That seems excessive. I've had a WRT54G since ~2006, and it is still going strong. *knock on wood* And I'm pretty sure my dad is still using a WRT54G from even earlier.
Same here, but I needed faster speeds for my home Network. My nephew used it for a few years until it died.


Yeah, those fans are small enough, I just wonder if they are too thick. The case really hugs the PCB, there isn't a lot of room in there. I'd have to cut through case, but that might actually be a good thing. Suck all the hot air out of the case. It looks like those two large Broadcom chips are the ones getting hot. I don't think I'd need nearly as much cooling as this guy. He's obviously installing custom firmware and maybe even overclocking it. I'm just using the stock firmware.
 

ruckstande

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Apr 2, 2005
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#19
Same here, but I needed faster speeds for my home Network. My nephew used it for a few years until it died.


Yeah, those fans are small enough, I just wonder if they are too thick. The case really hugs the PCB, there isn't a lot of room in there. I'd have to cut through case, but that might actually be a good thing. Suck all the hot air out of the case. It looks like those two large Broadcom chips are the ones getting hot. I don't think I'd need nearly as much cooling as this guy. He's obviously installing custom firmware and maybe even overclocking it. I'm just using the stock firmware.
Isn't a better router about $50? Save up and get an Asus.
 

GrammatonCleric

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Nov 19, 2008
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#21
Tiny + quiet = noctua.


Also vrm heatsinks might be a good addition if none of the chips have their own heatsinks.
 

Bobobie

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#24
Isn't a better router about $50? Save up and get an Asus.
I know I'll have to do that eventually, but I'm just hacking at this for the hell of it. I picked up a couple of Heatsinks for 6 dollars on Amazon. It's actually part of a cooling kit for the Xbox360, but they seem to be the right size for those two Broadcom chips.
 

Bobobie

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#25
Heatsinks came in. There was actually already a Heatsink on one of the broadcom chips, the silver one. I thought there wasn't any, my great memory. It must be the CPU, and it was even chunkier than the two I bought so left it alone. I'm guessing it's cemented to that chip and didn't want to break if off. So I put the xtra heatsink on the next largest chip on the board. It didn't feel very warm, but that broadcom chip without the heatsink was pretty warm





I took the case outside, couldn't find my Drill battery so broke out my old hand cranked drill. It still took only ten minutes or so to drill a bunch holes on top of the case.




It seems to be working better than it did before averaging 2800-3000 KB/s vs 12000-18000 after a reset. I'm going to watch netflix for 2-3 hours straight and see how it holds up. The top doesn't feel hot anymore, just warm. Still going to get a replacement. Might use it in the future as a hub, because all my issues seem to be related to using the WIFI.