Trailers, Tidbits, and Other Stuff That Doesn't Need A Thread (Yet)

Neon

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#1
I came across two things today that I wanted to share here but I didn't think it was worth starting two new threads, so I thought maybe we could do a thread like this (maybe sticky it @SOS?) where you can post teasers or trailers for either small time projects that most people won't watch, or short films, or other interesting and/or weird projects that don't really need an entire thread. Also random/meta news items and such. You'll see my two posts below as examples of what I had in mind.
 

Neon

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#2
So A24 - the distributor of nearly every awesome indie flick in recent years (to name a few: “Moonlight,” “Ex Machina,” “Green Room,” “Krisha,” “American Honey,” “The Rover,” “The Lobster,” “The Witch,” “The End of the Tour,” “Locke,” “A Most Violent Year,” “Room,” “Swiss Army Man,” “Enemy” and “Under the Skin”) put out a mysterious teaser that just says "Untitled" and looks pretty cool:


Apparently whatever this is currently doesn't appear on A24's 2017 roster of about 10 flicks.
 

Neon

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#3
Trailer for a project I am pretty interested in - the weird Polish horror musical "The Lure." Apparently it's really good. It's the first film from this director (Agnieszka Smoczynska) and I hear it's shot beautifully and is really visual and fun and weird.


It came across my radar because people were comparing it to The Neon Demon, which I loved. @LiddyRules.
 

Pigdango

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#4
I saw a trailer for a Russian superhero team movie today. Looked weird and fun.

That's about the end of my story.
 

LiddyRules

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#5
The Road to Wellsville has a new trailer that doesn't use a slowed down version of Sarah Connor's favorite Elton John song.

 

mikeybot

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#6
I saw a trailer for a Russian superhero team movie today. Looked weird and fun.

That's about the end of my story.
The Russian Guardians that has a mutant bear in it?
Yeah, that looks bonkers in a good way
 

Neon

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#7
Trailer for the upcoming French film "Raw" about a Vegan in Veterinary school who becomes a cannibal.

 

Pigdango

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#8
Netflix has a new movie coming out called iBoy that reveals that Game of Thrones' Maisie Williams...yeesh.

 

Pigdango

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#12
Why do I think that the original Ponch and Jon will be the corrupt cops?
Because that was the plot of the 21 Jump Street movie?
 

LiddyRules

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#13
Because that was the plot of the 21 Jump Street movie?
What does that have to do with anything? This is completely different.
 

Neon

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#15
@Pigdango @LiddyRules @BIV @Bill Lehecka

Here's an interesting meta article you guys might enjoy:

THE SMALL WORLD OF MODERN THRILLERS

Plots used to be driven by real-world conflict, but now they revolve around domestic drama. It’s a trend that blights films and TV, from Sherlock to Bourne

There were an exciting few minutes during this week’s episode of the BBC’s “Sherlock” when it looked as if Sherlock Holmes was getting on with the job of being a detective. A client had come to 221B Baker Street with a mystery to be solved; Sherlock had deduced – well, guessed – that an entrepreneur named Culverton Smith (Toby Jones) was a serial killer; and he had devised an enjoyably ridiculous scheme to prove his suspicions. But then the writers performed one of their trademark rug-pulls. In the end, we learnt that Holmes’s main motivation for taking on the case was to shake Dr Watson (Martin Freeman) out of his depression. Then we learnt that it was Holmes’s long-lost sister (Sian Brooke) who had put him on the trail of Culverton Smith to begin with. The upshot was that the serial killing was more or less forgotten. Ultimately, the episode wasn’t about anything except Holmes and his closest friends and relatives.

There is something similar going on in numerous films and television series. The phenomenon has been called “universe-shrinking”. What happens is that the characters in a science-fiction or thriller franchise are initially sent off on adventures in the wider world. James Bond goes after Goldfinger, Doctor Who defends the Earth against the Daleks, and so on. But after a while that world grows smaller and smaller until there is nothing in it which isn’t connected to the protagonists.

The most famous example of this phenomenon pre-dates the current trend by four decades. George Lucas’s “Star Wars” saga introduced a hero, Luke Skywalker, who was a farm boy from the back of beyond. There was a great big galaxy out there that had nothing do with him – and that was what made the film so magical. The message was that even a lowly peasant from the middle of nowhere could rescue a beautiful princess and confound an aristocratic villain. But the sequel, “The Empire Strikes Back”, revealed that Luke was the son of that aristocratic villain, Darth Vader. And the third film in the trilogy, “The Return of the Jedi”, added that he was also the brother of the beautiful Princess Leia. A humble nobody’s rise to universe-saving glory was recast as a squabble over a royal breakfast table.

When “Star Wars” was revived in 2015 with “The Force Awakens”, this shift from galaxy-spanning epic to domestic soap opera was taken to a laughable new extreme: its villain, Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) was the son of Princess Leia and Han Solo, the nephew of Luke Skywalker and the grandson of Darth Vader. Meanwhile, Marvel’s “Captain America: Civil War” (2016) opened by debating the ethical issues raised by superheroes, but its final fight was about one character murdering another’s parents. And when the Bourne franchise returned last year with “Jason Bourne”, its amnesiac hero discovered that he wasn’t just a soldier who had enrolled in the CIA’s shadowy Operation Treadstone: he was the son of the man who had created Treadstone in the first place. Again and again, sprawling conflicts are being reduced to family feuds.

No example of this universe-shrinking is more heinous than the last James Bond outing, “Spectre” (2015). As conceived by Ian Fleming, Bond was a tool of the British intelligence service: a dedicated professional whose own background was irrelevant. But “Spectre” threw away that concept. Its big idea was that every one of the challenges faced by Daniel Craig’s 007 had been masterminded by his childhood chum, Franz Oberhauser (Christoph Waltz). Apparently, Oberhauser’s father had taken in the orphaned Bond, and little Franz had been so jealous that he became an international crime boss out of spite. And so it was that a franchise which used to hinge on cold-war terrorism became – much like the Austin Powers comedies – a slanging match between a pair of bickering brothers. If the two of them could have settled their differences with a game of conkers, they would have saved the rest of us a lot of bother.

It’s not too hard to see why such universe-shrinking appeals to screenwriters. Drama is fuelled by revelations, and there aren’t many revelations more momentous – or easier to write – than, “I am your father/sister/brother!” Giving the protagonist a personal involvement in the plot is also a simple way of raising the emotional stakes, as well as making him or her more sympathetic to the viewer. Most of us will never be lucky enough to blow up a moon-sized space station, as Luke Skywalker did, but we all know what it’s like to be angry at a parent or resentful of a sibling.

But I suspect that there is more to this trend than narrative expedience. The new spate of universe-shrinking, of plots driven by personal animus, could well be a sign of how narcissistic our culture has become, and how desperate film and television studios are to please fans who are obsessed by their favourite characters. But it’s also a symptom of globalisation: now that studios are so reliant on overseas sales, they don’t want to risk offending foreign markets. It’s safer to be personal than political.

Whatever the reasons, I’d much rather see Bond and Bourne righting wrongs that had nothing to do with them. Boiling down every plot to the protagonist’s own coterie makes their adventures seem like petty, private matters. It isn’t just the fictional universe which is diminished, but the nobility of the characters within it. Surely, one measure of heroism is to put your life on the line for a cause which doesn’t affect you personally. Fighting for or against your own family is all very well – but I’d expect better of Sherlock Holmes.
 

Neon

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#16
So A24 - the distributor of nearly every awesome indie flick in recent years (to name a few: “Moonlight,” “Ex Machina,” “Green Room,” “Krisha,” “American Honey,” “The Rover,” “The Lobster,” “The Witch,” “The End of the Tour,” “Locke,” “A Most Violent Year,” “Room,” “Swiss Army Man,” “Enemy” and “Under the Skin”) put out a mysterious teaser that just says "Untitled" and looks pretty cool:


Apparently whatever this is currently doesn't appear on A24's 2017 roster of about 10 flicks.
This was revealed to be a trailer for a short film that will premiere at Sundance called Toru. Plot sounds like an episode of Black Mirror.
 

Pigdango

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#17
@Pigdango @LiddyRules @BIV @Bill Lehecka

Here's an interesting meta article you guys might enjoy:

THE SMALL WORLD OF MODERN THRILLERS

Plots used to be driven by real-world conflict, but now they revolve around domestic drama. It’s a trend that blights films and TV, from Sherlock to Bourne

There were an exciting few minutes during this week’s episode of the BBC’s “Sherlock” when it looked as if Sherlock Holmes was getting on with the job of being a detective. A client had come to 221B Baker Street with a mystery to be solved; Sherlock had deduced – well, guessed – that an entrepreneur named Culverton Smith (Toby Jones) was a serial killer; and he had devised an enjoyably ridiculous scheme to prove his suspicions. But then the writers performed one of their trademark rug-pulls. In the end, we learnt that Holmes’s main motivation for taking on the case was to shake Dr Watson (Martin Freeman) out of his depression. Then we learnt that it was Holmes’s long-lost sister (Sian Brooke) who had put him on the trail of Culverton Smith to begin with. The upshot was that the serial killing was more or less forgotten. Ultimately, the episode wasn’t about anything except Holmes and his closest friends and relatives.

There is something similar going on in numerous films and television series. The phenomenon has been called “universe-shrinking”. What happens is that the characters in a science-fiction or thriller franchise are initially sent off on adventures in the wider world. James Bond goes after Goldfinger, Doctor Who defends the Earth against the Daleks, and so on. But after a while that world grows smaller and smaller until there is nothing in it which isn’t connected to the protagonists.

The most famous example of this phenomenon pre-dates the current trend by four decades. George Lucas’s “Star Wars” saga introduced a hero, Luke Skywalker, who was a farm boy from the back of beyond. There was a great big galaxy out there that had nothing do with him – and that was what made the film so magical. The message was that even a lowly peasant from the middle of nowhere could rescue a beautiful princess and confound an aristocratic villain. But the sequel, “The Empire Strikes Back”, revealed that Luke was the son of that aristocratic villain, Darth Vader. And the third film in the trilogy, “The Return of the Jedi”, added that he was also the brother of the beautiful Princess Leia. A humble nobody’s rise to universe-saving glory was recast as a squabble over a royal breakfast table.

When “Star Wars” was revived in 2015 with “The Force Awakens”, this shift from galaxy-spanning epic to domestic soap opera was taken to a laughable new extreme: its villain, Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) was the son of Princess Leia and Han Solo, the nephew of Luke Skywalker and the grandson of Darth Vader. Meanwhile, Marvel’s “Captain America: Civil War” (2016) opened by debating the ethical issues raised by superheroes, but its final fight was about one character murdering another’s parents. And when the Bourne franchise returned last year with “Jason Bourne”, its amnesiac hero discovered that he wasn’t just a soldier who had enrolled in the CIA’s shadowy Operation Treadstone: he was the son of the man who had created Treadstone in the first place. Again and again, sprawling conflicts are being reduced to family feuds.

No example of this universe-shrinking is more heinous than the last James Bond outing, “Spectre” (2015). As conceived by Ian Fleming, Bond was a tool of the British intelligence service: a dedicated professional whose own background was irrelevant. But “Spectre” threw away that concept. Its big idea was that every one of the challenges faced by Daniel Craig’s 007 had been masterminded by his childhood chum, Franz Oberhauser (Christoph Waltz). Apparently, Oberhauser’s father had taken in the orphaned Bond, and little Franz had been so jealous that he became an international crime boss out of spite. And so it was that a franchise which used to hinge on cold-war terrorism became – much like the Austin Powers comedies – a slanging match between a pair of bickering brothers. If the two of them could have settled their differences with a game of conkers, they would have saved the rest of us a lot of bother.

It’s not too hard to see why such universe-shrinking appeals to screenwriters. Drama is fuelled by revelations, and there aren’t many revelations more momentous – or easier to write – than, “I am your father/sister/brother!” Giving the protagonist a personal involvement in the plot is also a simple way of raising the emotional stakes, as well as making him or her more sympathetic to the viewer. Most of us will never be lucky enough to blow up a moon-sized space station, as Luke Skywalker did, but we all know what it’s like to be angry at a parent or resentful of a sibling.

But I suspect that there is more to this trend than narrative expedience. The new spate of universe-shrinking, of plots driven by personal animus, could well be a sign of how narcissistic our culture has become, and how desperate film and television studios are to please fans who are obsessed by their favourite characters. But it’s also a symptom of globalisation: now that studios are so reliant on overseas sales, they don’t want to risk offending foreign markets. It’s safer to be personal than political.

Whatever the reasons, I’d much rather see Bond and Bourne righting wrongs that had nothing to do with them. Boiling down every plot to the protagonist’s own coterie makes their adventures seem like petty, private matters. It isn’t just the fictional universe which is diminished, but the nobility of the characters within it. Surely, one measure of heroism is to put your life on the line for a cause which doesn’t affect you personally. Fighting for or against your own family is all very well – but I’d expect better of Sherlock Holmes.
You can probably find quotes of me grousing about this as far back as I've had an account. My frequently used phrase is "why does everyone have to be someone else's father?" It worked beautifully in Star Wars because it took the time to establish an entire mythology that made the relationship between Luke and Vader far more than just a gimmick.

I've literally been pissed off about this type of universe shrinking since 1989 when Last Crusade came out. I'm glad at least someone else is finally starting to pick up on it. Unfortunately I don't see the trend changing as everyone continues to search for that "I am your father" moment.
 

Neon

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#18
You can probably find quotes of me grousing about this as far back as I've had an account. My frequently used phrase is "why does everyone have to be someone else's father?" It worked beautifully in Star Wars because it took the time to establish an entire mythology that made the relationship between Luke and Vader far more than just a gimmick.

I've literally been pissed off about this type of universe shrinking since 1989 when Last Crusade came out. I'm glad at least someone else is finally starting to pick up on it. Unfortunately I don't see the trend changing as everyone continues to search for that "I am your father" moment.
I mentioned it on my podcast and elsewhere too and I've heard it echoed by others too. I always referred to it as destiny. Like everyone is the chosen one and everyone was somehow fated to have these things happen to them. Sometimes that's canonical, like Harry Potter, but then you do it with shit like Bond or Ninja Turtles or Spider-Man and it gets really fucking tired.
 

Pigdango

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#19
I mentioned it on my podcast and elsewhere too and I've heard it echoed by others too. I always referred to it as destiny. Like everyone is the chosen one and everyone was somehow fated to have these things happen to them. Sometimes that's canonical, like Harry Potter, but then you do it with shit like Bond or Ninja Turtles or Spider-Man and it gets really fucking tired.
I guess i am more ok with the chosen one shit than I am that the chosen one always has to have a chosen dad. Harry Potter to me is another example where she took the time to create an entire world around the conflict between him and Voldemort, so it feels organic even if the general concept is a bit cliched and played out. The one thing it got very right is it left Harry's parents safely dead and (an important) part of his past. I thought what she did with Snape was a clever expansion of the shrinking universe thing.

I will even use Man of Steel as another example where the universe shrinking is actually ok. It's not done well in the movie, but it is at least an essential part of the Superman mythology, not something tacked on as an afterthought to somehow make the hero more relatable. For better or worse, they constructed the entire movie around it instead of a misdirection like they mentioned with Sherlock and Spectre.
 

BIV

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#21
Hasbro Held Off Transformers/G.I. Joe Crossover, Says Director D.J. Caruso

"They just wanna really get it right."
By Alex Osborn

Director D.J. Caruso wanted to make G.I. Joe 3 a Transformers/G.I. Joe crossover film, but Paramount and Hasbro ultimately decided against bringing the two worlds together.

When discussing G.I. Joe 3 in an interview with Collider, Caruso said the studio isn't ready to move forward with a crossover just yet: "That’s exactly what they should do, but they’re not ready to do that, because in fact the script that I was developing, the two worlds sort of collided at the end and when they read it they were like, 'We’re not ready to do this yet.'"

Caruso went on to say he believes that Hasbro and Paramount "will eventually collide those two worlds and it's probably when Mr. Bay decides he's done with Transformers."

A couple of years ago, Hasbro and Paramount announced plans to unite several franchises, including G.I. Joe, Micronauts, Visionaries, ROM and M.A.S.K., all under a single, shared movie universe.

As for the future of G.I. Joe 3, the director thinks the studio wanted to "reassess" the project and "so now they're going back to the drawing board, and we'll be talking again about it." Caruso went on to acknowledge that "it's a valuable franchise" and "they just wanna really get it right and see if they can push it to the next level."

Caruso's latest directorial work, xXx: Return of Xander Cage opens in theaters tomorrow, January 20. Check out our review.

Meanwhile, the next entry in the Transformers franchise debuts in June.

http://www.ign.com/articles/2017/01...rmersgi-joe-crossover-says-director-dj-caruso
 

LiddyRules

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#23
What the fuck is this?!

When I saw your text I was hoping you were referring to Boss Baby


But that movie is from the guy who directed the amazing Time Crimes.
 

Neon

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#25
When I saw your text I was hoping you were referring to Boss Baby


But that movie is from the guy who directed the amazing Time Crimes.
I heard about Boss Baby from Weekly Planet. Wait, Colossal is the guy who did Timecrimes??