TSA Will Permit Knives, Golf Clubs on U.S. Planes

mr. sin

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#1
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-03-05/tsa-will-permit-knives-golf-clubs-on-u-s-planes.html


The U.S. Transportation Security Administration will let people carry small pocketknives onto passenger planes for the first time since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, along with golf clubs, hockey sticks and plastic Wiffle Ball-style bats.
The agency will permit knives with retractable blades shorter than 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) and narrower than 1/2 inch at the widest point, TSA Administrator John Pistole said today at an aviation security conference in Brooklyn. The change, to conform with international rules, will take effect April 25.
Pistole, the former No. 2 official at the Federal Bureau of Investigation, has stressed the use of intelligence and “risk- based” security during his tenure leading TSA. The agency is moving away from uniform procedures that apply to every passenger and toward efforts to perform background checks on passengers before they arrive at an airport.
Overseas passengers will no longer have to check the qualifying knives as they pass through the U.S. The agency will still prohibit some knives, including those with locking blades or molded handles, Pistole said. Box cutters, like those used by the Sept. 11 terrorists, and razor blades will still be banned.
The agency will relax its prohibited-item list in other ways, Pistole said. Passengers will be allowed to carry on sticks used to play lacrosse, billiards and hockey, ski poles and as many as two golf clubs, he said.
Sporting Goods

The agency is also carving out two exceptions to its ban on most baseball and softball bats. It will allow souvenir, novelty baseball bats less than 24 inches long and will permit lightweight plastic bats even if they’re more than 2 feet long (61 centimeters).
The sporting goods have been deemed acceptable based on recommendations from a TSA working group that’s trying to weed out commonly confiscated items that don’t present a security threat, agency spokesman David Castelveter said.
“These are popular items we see regularly,” Castelveter said. “They don’t present a risk to transportation security.”
 

tattered

Uber-Aryan
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Aug 22, 2002
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#2
Not surprised they're allowing hockey sticks those carbon fiber ones shatter easier than a 16yr old girls self esteem
 

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
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#6
New TSA rules on knives draw fire from 9/11 kin

New TSA rules allowing small knives on planes draw fire from some Sept. 11 family members

By Karen Matthews, Associated Press | Associated Press – 4 hrs ago

NEW YORK (AP) -- Some family members of victims killed in the Sept. 11 terror attacks said Wednesday that they are outraged by the Transportation Security Administration's decision to let passengers carry pocketknives on planes.

TSA Administrator John Pistole announced Tuesday that airline passengers will be able to carry pocketknives with blades less than 2.36 inches long and less than half an inch wide. Souvenir baseball bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment also will be permitted starting next month.

The agency said the policy aligns the U.S. with international standards and allows the TSA to concentrate on more serious safety threats.

Unions representing flight attendants and other airline workers decried the change, and several relatives of people killed when terrorists hijacked four U.S. airliners on Sept. 11, 2001, criticized the move as well.

"I'm flabbergasted," said Sally Regenhard, whose firefighter son was killed at the World Trade Center. "I'm really disgusted by this latest news."

Regenhard said she recently had a container of yogurt confiscated by the TSA because it was a gel. "I'm just wondering why a yogurt is more dangerous than a penknife or a golf club," she said.

Debra Burlingame, whose brother Charles was the pilot of the plane that crashed into the Pentagon, said a pocketknife can be just as deadly as a box cutter, like the ones the hijackers used. Box cutters will still be banned under the new rules.

"When you're drawing a blade against someone's neck, they're quite lethal," Burlingame said. "This is bad news."

Burlingame said Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed told interrogators that the hijackers each used "a Swiss knife," a brand of pocketknife, to butcher a sheep and a camel as part of their training. The transcript of the 2003 interrogation was part of the 9/11 Commission Report.

Burlingame suspects the TSA decided to allow folding knives because they are hard to spot. She said the agency's employees "have a difficult time seeing these knives on X-ray screening, which lowers their performance testing rates."

Asked to respond, a TSA spokesman reiterated that "the decision to permit these items as carry-on was made as part of TSA's overall risk-based security approach and aligns TSA with international standards."

Several relatives of those who died on United Flight 93, whose passengers tried to wrest control of the plane before it crashed in Shanksville, Pa., questioned the policy change.

"What's the difference between a pocketknife and a box cutter, for crying out loud?" asked David Beamer, whose son Todd led the Flight 93 revolt with the words, "Let's roll." ''I cannot see the upside to this."

Alice Hoagland, whose son Mark Bingham was another leader of the attempt to take back Flight 93, called it "a dreadful mistake to loosen the rules."

"We are increasing the chances of flight attendants and passengers being attacked while in the air," said Hoagland, a retired flight attendant. "This decision was made in order to make the TSA look a little better, to ease up on the standard so they won't have egg on their face."

Hamilton Peterson, who lost his father and stepmother on Fight 93, said, "I have enormous respect for the great work of the TSA; however, I am concerned this may undermine overall counterterrorism vigilance and may well prove to be dangerous to future passengers and crew who will inherit the danger resulting from this decision."
http://news.yahoo.com/tsa-rules-kni...1lBHB0A3NlY3Rpb25zBHRlc3QDVGVzdF9BRkM-;_ylv=3
 

Ballbuster1

In The Danger Zone...
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Aug 26, 2002
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#7
pocketknives with blades less than 2.36 inches long and less than half an inch wide. Souvenir baseball bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment also will be permitted starting next month.
That's not even a full sized folding blade. I see no danger there.

As for the other stuff I have more of a problem with taking up overhead
cargo space carrying that stuff on. People already drag too much shit on
to planes to avoid baggage fees. How are they gonna stow golf clubs or
hockey sticks?
 

the Streif

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Aug 25, 2002
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#8
That's not even a full sized folding blade. I see no danger there.

As for the other stuff I have more of a problem with taking up overhead
cargo space carrying that stuff on. People already drag too much shit on
to planes to avoid baggage fees. How are they gonna stow golf clubs or
hockey sticks?

Have them shoved up their asses. Fuck them. they don't need to bring hockey sticks and golf clubs on board. They make fucking specific travel cases for shit like that. Check it and get charged for it ya fuck!
 

gleet

What's black and white and red all over?
Jul 24, 2005
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#9
After 9-11 I found an auction site that had confiscated TSA stuff. I got big boxes of pocketknives really cheap, the shipping was more than the knives. There were tons of the little Victorinox penknives and the regular size ones, plus all sorts of others from junk to fancy dress knives and old family heirlooms and multitools. Not a one of them would have been used in a hijacking and I felt sad for the people who lost them. After winning a few, word got out and they started going for way more than they were worth.
 

mascan42

Registered User
Aug 26, 2002
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#10
Some family members of victims killed in the Sept. 11 terror attacks said Wednesday that they are outraged by the Transportation Security Administration's decision to let passengers carry pocketknives on planes.

"I'm flabbergasted," said Sally Regenhard, whose firefighter son was killed at the World Trade Center. "I'm really disgusted by this latest news."

"What's the difference between a pocketknife and a box cutter, for crying out loud?" asked David Beamer, whose son Todd led the Flight 93 revolt with the words, "Let's roll." ''I cannot see the upside to this."

Alice Hoagland, whose son Mark Bingham was another leader of the attempt to take back Flight 93, called it "a dreadful mistake to loosen the rules."
You know, I think we may have finally reached the point where we have to tell the 9/11 families that having a dead relative doesn't qualify you to comment on national security.
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
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#11
I think my Leatherman blade is about 4 inches.....no go

My buddy (accidentally) boarded a plane out of JFK a few weeks ago with a canister of pepper spray in his backpack. I don't think a few pen knives are the real risk here.