Wackbag Book Club- April 2014- Time for Time Travel

What Do You Choose?

  • Catch 22 by Joseph Heller

    Votes: 2 20.0%
  • A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole

    Votes: 1 10.0%
  • I, Fatty by Jerry Stahl

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Inherent Vice by Thomas Pynchon

    Votes: 4 40.0%
  • Post Office by Charles Bukowski

    Votes: 3 30.0%

  • Total voters
    10

LiddyRules

RIP King of France. Gutted Like Fish Under R Line
#1
Okay gang. For my month's book selections, I went with the theme of time travel. In the following choices, the author travels back in time to write about a story decades before the book was published.

Catch 22 by Joseph Heller




At the heart of Catch-22 resides the incomparable, malingering bombardier, Yossarian, a hero endlessly inventive in his schemes to save his skin from the horrible chances of war. His problem is Colonel Cathcart, who keeps raising the number of missions the men must fly to complete their service. Yet if Yossarian makes any attempts to excuse himself from the perilous missions that he is committed to flying, he is trapped by the Great Loyalty Oath Crusade, the bureaucratic rule from which the book takes its title: a man is considered insane if he willingly continues to fly dangerous combat missions, but if he makes the necessary formal request to be relieved of such missions, the very act of making the request proves that he is sane and therefore ineligible to be relieved.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/168668.Catch_22

A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole



A Confederacy of Dunces is an American comic masterpiece. John Kennedy Toole's hero is one Ignatius J. Reilly, "huge, obese, fractious, fastidious, a latter-day Gargantua, a Don Quixote of the French Quarter. His story bursts with wholly original characters, denizens of New Orleans' lower depths, incredibly true-to-life dialogue, and the zaniest series of high and low comic adventures"
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/310612.A_Confederacy_of_Dunces

I, Fatty by Jerry Stahl




In this highly acclaimed novel, the author of Permanent Midnight channels fallen early-Hollywood star Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle. Fatty tells his own story of success, addiction, and a precipitous fall from grace after being framed for a brutal crime-a national media scandal that set the precedent for those so familiar today.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/95376.I_Fatty?

Inherent Vice by Thomas Pynchon



I was debating between this and The Crying of Lot 49, but was swayed by the linked theme and the upcoming movie.

It's been awhile since Doc Sportello has seen his ex-girlfriend. Suddenly out of nowhere she shows up with a story about a plot to kidnap a billionaire land developer whom she just happens to be in love with. Easy for her to say. It's the tail end of the psychedelic sixties in L.A., and Doc knows that "love" is another of those words going around at the moment, like "trip" or "groovy," except that this one usually leads to trouble. Despite which he soon finds himself drawn into a bizarre tangle of motives and passions whose cast of characters includes surfers, hustlers, dopers and rockers, a murderous loan shark, a tenor sax player working undercover, an ex-con with a swastika tattoo and a fondness for Ethel Merman, and a mysterious entity known as the Golden Fang, which may only be a tax dodge set up by some dentists.

In this lively yarn, Thomas Pynchon, working in an unaccustomed genre, provides a classic illustration of the principle that if you can remember the sixties, you weren't there . . . or . . . if you were there, then you . . . or, wait, is it . . .
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5933841-inherent-vice


Post Office by Charles Bukowski



"It began as a mistake." By middle age, Henry Chinaski has lost more than twelve years of his life to the U.S. Postal Service. In a world where his three true, bitter pleasures are women, booze, and racetrack betting, he somehow drags his hangover out of bed every dawn to lug waterlogged mailbags up mud-soaked mountains, outsmart vicious guard dogs, and pray to survive the day-to-day trials of sadistic bosses and certifiable coworkers. This classic 1971 novella the one that catapulted its author to national fame is the perfect introduction to the grimly hysterical world of legendary writer, poet, and Dirty Old Man Charles Bukowski and his fictional alter ego, Chinaski.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/51504.Post_Office
 

HandPanzer

Shantih Shantih Shantih
#4
Fuck, this is a tough one. Every book is great.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
#6
Catch-22 was great, but I don't like re-reading books. I'll think about this more tomorrow. Very interested.

I'm also still going to try to get to this and last months' books, if I can. I just haven't had any time to read lately. And I still have to read the next GoT before next month. Fuck!
 

HandPanzer

Shantih Shantih Shantih
#7
I went with Inherent Vice. This was going to be a reread for me regardless of the book, so I figured I'd like to read IV again before it's made into a film. It'll be interesting to see how PT Anderson adapts this to the screen, and I'm looking forward to Pynchon's reception in our book club.
 

DrewDown

All are welcome
#8
My heart says Bukowski, because . . . Bukowski. My head says Pynchon, especially since I haven't read much. The best choice is probably Confederacy of Dunces, but I've read that one. Loved it, but I want something new.
 

Kugzilla

Roar. Go: Eagles, Flyers, Philles, Buckeyes, etc.
#9
I'm leaning towards vice as I've done dunces and 22.
 

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
#10
By process of elimination, I picked Inherent Vice.

Very disappointed to go into a time travel thread to find no books about time travel. :(
 

LiddyRules

RIP King of France. Gutted Like Fish Under R Line
#11
By process of elimination, I picked Inherent Vice.

Very disappointed to go into a time travel thread to find no books about time travel. :(
Ain't I a stinker?
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
#13
Had to go with "Post Office", I've been meaning to get around to that one for a while.
 

HandPanzer

Shantih Shantih Shantih
#14
It looks like it's a two horse race. I'm surprised there were no votes for Catch-22 or Confederacy of Dunces, perhaps everyone's read them already.
 
#15
Someone gave me A Confederacy of Dunces a couple of years ago and I still have the book but haven't read it. I loved Catch 22 when I read it. Solid choices all around. I'll decide a bit later. As I told Liddy in the other thread, I got really backed up with a nutty schedule lately but I will put in some quality reading time to catch up.

I see its neck and neck between Bukowski and Pynchon. I can live with that, being that Bukowski invented my name.
 

LiddyRules

RIP King of France. Gutted Like Fish Under R Line
#16
Someone gave me A Confederacy of Dunces a couple of years ago and I still have the book but haven't read it. I loved Catch 22 when I read it. Solid choices all around. I'll decide a bit later. As I told Liddy in the other thread, I got really backed up with a nutty schedule lately but I will put in some quality reading time to catch up.
Couldn't even join your own damn party.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
#19
I went ahead and uploaded the selections to the usual place. I was having a tough time finding "I, Fatty", so I gave up (it doesn't have any votes anyway)... but if anyone is interested in reading it I could probably search it out with the slightest bit of effort.
 

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
Donator
#20
Catch 22 was a great read... but been there, done that.

Confederacy... musta read that one at least half a dozen times. If you haven't read CoD... read it immediately, or kill yourself. Those are your only two options.

Going with the Bukowski, but the Fatty looks really good too.
 

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
Donator
#22
I went ahead and uploaded the selections to the usual place. I was having a tough time finding "I, Fatty", so I gave up (it doesn't have any votes anyway)... but if anyone is interested in reading it I could probably search it out with the slightest bit of effort.
I would appreciate it if you could find Fatty. That looks interesting.

I love the tales of the life and times of drugged up alcoholic party animals.
 
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