Wall Street firms donated $11.2 million to members of debt ‘super committee’

Oct 8, 2005
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#1
The bipartisan "super committee" created by the debt ceiling deal is comprised of lawmakers who have received big bucks from special interest groups, according to a report by MapLight.

The committee is tasked with finding at least $1.2 trillion in deficit cuts over ten years.

In total, the twelve members appointed to the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction got nearly $64.5 million from special interests groups over the past decade, with legal firms donating about $31.5 million and Wall Street firms donating about $11.2 million.

Of that $11.2 million, Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase donated approximately $2 million combined.

The members appointed to the committee are Sens. Pat Toomey (R-PA), Jon Kyl (R-AZ), Rob Portman (R-OH), Patty Murray (D-WA), John Kerry (D-MA), and Max Baucus (D-MT) and Reps. Jeb Hensarling (R-TX), Fred Upton (R-MI), Dave Camp (R-MI), Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), Xavier Becerra (D-CA), and Jim Clyburn (D-SC).

Democratic and liberal groups donated the third most amount of money, with about $9.6 million in political contributions, and the health industry donated the fourth most, with about $9.3 million.

Club for Growth, a conservative free market group, donated more money than any other organization, contributing a combined $990,066 to the twelve lawmakers. The vast majority of that money went to Sen. Toomey.

Microsoft Corp. donated the second most, with $810,100.

The six Republicans on the committee have signed a pledge by Americans for Tax Reform to vote against any tax increases.

If the panel deadlocks, or Congress fails to approve its recommendations, the debt-limit deal calls for painful automatic cuts of $1.2 trillion to the military and health care for the elderly, designed to be so politically costly to both sides as to compel a compromise.

With AFP.
Fascists.

Obamas top donators
Goldman Sachs $1,013,091
JPMorgan Chase & Co $808,799
Citigroup Inc $736,771
Google Inc $814,540
Microsoft Corp $852,167
I think we know who really runs the country. "Donate" a few million to politicians and make laws that allow you to steal billions and sometimes trillions. But some people still think social programs are the main problem.
 

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
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Mar 10, 2006
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#2
Corporations donate money to politicians?! Get the fuck out of here!

:icon_roll

Quite the discovery you just made there, Kirk.


Isn't it fun watching Kirk grow up and mature right before our eyes?
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
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#3
What are Rick Perry's and Michele Bachmann's top donors? I bet the list looks remarkably similar.
 
Oct 8, 2005
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Corporations donate money to politicians?! Get the fuck out of here!

:icon_roll

Quite the discovery you just made there, Kirk.


Isn't it fun watching Kirk grow up and mature right before our eyes?
And you don't see a problem with that? When you allow politicians to take millions from corporations how can you not expect it to go bad?
 

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
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#8
And you don't see a problem with that? When you allow politicians to take millions from corporations how can you not expect it to go bad?
Of course it's a problem... where did I say it wasn't?

My point is that you're a dipshit for thinking you're telling anybody anything they didn't already know. It's great that you're taking your first intellectual baby steps and figuring out how the world works... good for you. Now run along... the adults who figured this shit out a long time ago are talking.
 
Oct 8, 2005
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Hoffman

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#10
Texas will build the track we want - Bernie Ecclestone



And this goofball just gave his daughter a few billion so she could buy two mansions worth 300 million but the Texas Tax payers have to pay to build his track. No wonder he has so much money, he takes none of the risk and gets all of the profits, if anyone goes to this track.
...and you realize that the LARGEST investor in the project is Red McCombs right? As for the headline of that article, well its quite misleading I'd say. But, you clearly don't understand Formula 1. I'll give you a pass.
 
Oct 8, 2005
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#11
What are Rick Perry's and Michele Bachmann's top donors? I bet the list looks remarkably similar.
Here we go...

[video=youtube;WRAXKbj7V4E]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRAXKbj7V4E&feature=player_embedded#![/video]

Should we be surprised, frightened, disgusted or simply say “we knew it”, that in the informal mixer just after Texas Governor and Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry spoke at a Politics and Eggs breakfast in Bedford, New Hampshire, an unknown gentlemen approaches a casual Perry like an Ian Flemming character, and proceeds to dead drop the following: “Bank of America… We will help you out“… and silently moves on. At least we know now who is funding what, and whose interests potential future president Perry will be paid to defend.
Another banker supported candidate... unless its a MSM edited clip.....
 

CousinDave

Registered User
Dec 11, 2007
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#13
Wall Street has to pay protection money to all politicians

Starbucks is about to find out why

http://money.cnn.com/2011/08/16/news/economy/starbucks_boycott_washington/index.htm

Starbucks CEO to DC: You've been cut off

By Charles Riley @CNNMoney August 16, 2011: 5:32 PM ET

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz is fed up with Washington.
And he is doing something about it.

Spurred by what he describes as a failure of leadership on the part of lawmakers, Schultz is mounting a one-man bull rush against a political culture that has "chosen to put partisan and ideological purity over the well being of the people."
What does that mean? No more political donations -- not for anybody.
And he's recruiting other CEOs to join him.
"I am asking that all of us forgo political contributions until the Congress and the President return to Washington and deliver a fiscally, disciplined long term debt and deficit plan to the American people," Schultz wrote in a letter that was passed on to members of the NYSE and Nasdaq.
The goal is to hit lawmakers right where it hurts: the pocketbook.
"All it seems people are interested in is re-election," Schultz told CNNMoney on Tuesday. "And that re-election -- the lifeblood of it is fundraising."
Schultz said his breaking point was the contentious debate over raising the debt ceiling -- and the failure to reach a long-term solution to lower deficits.

"[Lawmakers] have stirred up fears about our economic prospects without doing anything to truly address those fears," Schultz wrote to his fellow CEOs.
Schultz's own political donations, as chronicled by the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics, skew heavily Democratic. Out of a total $183,650 in donations, only $1,000 went to Republican candidates.
He said politicians can still make it right by coming together and reaching a compromise deal that would lift the cloud of uncertainty that has hamstrung the economy.
"It means reaching a deal on debt, revenue, and spending long before the deadline arrives this fall," the letter said. "It means considering all options, from entitlement programs to taxes."
His letters, and an interview with the New York Times on the subject, are already having an impact.
The Starbucks (SBUX, Fortune 500) CEO said that in the 30 hours since the letters went out, he has heard back from thousands of Americans -- both CEOs and everyday citizens. Not one lawmaker has contacted him so far.
Buffett to Congress: Don't 'coddle' me
"I suspect in the coming days, people who will be signing the pledge with me will be both Republican and Democrat CEOs who have had enough," he told CNNMoney.
The amount of money spent to influence elections has been steadily climbing.
During the 2008 election cycle, more than $5.2 billion was spent by candidates, political parties and interest groups, according to data compiled by the non-partisan Center for Responsive Politics
In 2010 -- a year that did not include a presidential election -- $3.6 billion was spent. Of course, 2012 has the potential to break all records.
It's unclear exactly how much of an impact -- if any -- Schultz's pledge might have. But a relatively small number of Americans do wield an outsized influence when it comes to political donations.
Only 0.04% of Americans give in excess of $200 to candidates, parties or political action committees -- and those donations account for 64.8% of all contributions.
 

NuttyJim

Well-Known Member
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Feb 18, 2006
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#14
In tomorrows breaking news we'll find out that the Sun is yellow. Politicians getting contributions from Political Action Committees, large companies and special interests are nothing new. Nothing new here, move along.
 
Oct 8, 2005
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Good lord there's so much wrong with entire statement.
Explain.

Texans irked about lawmakers spending $25M to woo F1 while teachers are dismissed

Texas motorsports enthusiasts are no doubt excited about the Circuit of the Americas. Formula One racing, along with MotoGP, will have a new home in Austin, and the United States Grand Prix is sure to attract fans and fan money. Some, however, are not thrilled at the spending decisions being made by Texan lawmakers, as they apparently feel though the money being spent to bring racing to the state could otherwise be used to help teachers keep their jobs.

How much has Texas pledged to bring F1 racing to Austin? According to Bloomberg, Texas Comptroller Susan Combs has signed off to shell out $25 million per year through 2022. That's a massive chunk of change, and some are not too thrilled at this idea as at the same time, 100,000 teachers could be losing their jobs.

That $25 million per year figure would not be enough to save 100,000 jobs. However, it could save the jobs of 500 teachers earning $48,000 per year. While CotA is bound to bring serious tourist and racing-fan money to the Austin area, should Texas be spending $25 million when teachers across the state are likely to find themselves out of work soon? Have your say in Comments.
 

Josh_R

Registered User
Jan 29, 2005
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#17
"Donate" a few million to politicians and make laws that allow you to steal billions and sometimes trillions. But some people still think social programs are the main problem.
It's not stealing if they give it away to you. This "Fuck the bankers, MMMAAAANNNN!!!" attitude is the problem with this country. How about instead of being mad at someone who has the means to sway public policy in their favor, we get mad at the whores who allow themselves to bought? All I hear is about how the rich are buying our country, so people vote for democrats because they "hate" the rich. The anger in this country is completely displaced at those who have earned the means necessary to make their own lives easier, instead of being directed at the dickwads who are more than willing to help them out for a few bucks.

We see what happens when you don't cater to special interests......ask Ron Paul.
Yeah, you get to go to bed at night knowing that none of this is your fault, and that you did your best to prevent or fix it.
 

Hoffman

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#18

The Godfather

Spark it up for The Godfather and say!!!!!
May 9, 2007
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#19
this is exactly why we need to move away from the outdated model of capitalism, towards a more central communal system of economics.
 

Hoffman

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#20
this is exactly why we need to move away from the outdated model of capitalism, towards a more central communal system of economics.
There's an island just a couple miles south of Key West who will gladly take you in.
 

The Godfather

Spark it up for The Godfather and say!!!!!
May 9, 2007
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#21
There's an island just a couple miles south of Key West who will gladly take you in.
I think i'll just wait a few years and enjoy it here in America