What Are You Reading Now?

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
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Started The Master and Margarita. I assumed someone here suggested it but a search isn't bringing anything up.
This looks good. I'm reading The Brothers Karamazov right now, maybe I'll read this next and keep a Russian theme for 2019.
 
Speaking of a Russian theme, I just finished reading The Screen Is Red: Hollywood, Communism, and The Cold War, by Bernard F. Dick.

A fantastic read that proves how influential that period of time was on pop culture.
 

Jacuzzi Billy

Watching PTI
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Mad Dog: The Maurice Vachon Story by Pat LaPrade and Bertrand Hebert.

A biography of wrestling legend Mad Dog Vachon, the Olympian who became an in-ring maniac. Plenty of fights with fans, as well as helping out young wrestlers. As an AWA child, I'm automatically drawn to stories about the wrestlers from that company.
 
Chefs, Drugs & Rock & Roll by Andrew Friedman

The story of the growth of the American restaurant scene from the early 1970s through the '90s. Alice Waters and Jeremiah Tower in the Bay Area, Wolfgang Puck in L.A., Larry Forgione and Charlie Palmer in New York, Jonathan Waxman on both coasts. They were willing to challenge French culinary elitism and promoted local ingredients and eventually became pals, their camaraderie eventually leading to today's celebrity chef culture.

I got this at a James Beard Foundation dinner, as a gift bag, signed by the author and the chefs in attendance (including Tower, Mary Sue Milliken, and Nancy Silverton, among others).
 

DiggerNick

Well-Known Member
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There's a Jeremiah Tower doc on Netflix that Bourdain is in a lot. I had no idea who Tower was but it's fascinating.
 

LiddyRules

The 9/11 Moon Landings Were An Outside Job
If you haven't read them:

David Copperfield
Oliver Twist
Bleak House

"Sleeper" Dickens:

Our Mutual Friend
Little Dorrit
I've never read any of those. I think I tried Cop and Twist but they ended up falling by the wayside. That happens a lot to me with that era of books, where I could actually be into reading them, but because they're so long if I get distracted for a week, I'm ready to move on. Not because of the book but because if I keep getting distracted, not only won't I read that book, but I won't read any other book because I'm focused on that one.

I just started Oil! by Upton Sinclair, the book that There Will Be Blood was based on.
 

Jacuzzi Billy

Watching PTI
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I've never read any of those. I think I tried Cop and Twist but they ended up falling by the wayside. That happens a lot to me with that era of books, where I could actually be into reading them, but because they're so long if I get distracted for a week, I'm ready to move on. Not because of the book but because if I keep getting distracted, not only won't I read that book, but I won't read any other book because I'm focused on that one.

I just started Oil! by Upton Sinclair, the book that There Will Be Blood was based on.
I know that movie!
 

Falldog

Wackbag's Best Conservative
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Started listening to Senlin Ascends. I have no idea what it's about, other than it's fantasy and involves the tower of Babel (not really like the mythical Babel from what I can tell, more like High Rise big tower stuff).
 
www.amazon.com/Man-Train-Solving-Century-Old-Mystery-ebook/dp/B01M4QEECQ



n Edgar Award finalist for Best Fact Crime, this “impressive…open-eyed investigative inquiry wrapped within a cultural history of rural America” (The Wall Street Journal) shows legendary statistician and baseball writer Bill James applying his analytical acumen to crack an unsolved century-old mystery surrounding one of the deadliest serial killers in American history.

Between 1898 and 1912, families across the country were bludgeoned in their sleep with the blunt side of an axe. Some of these cases—like the infamous Villisca, Iowa, murders—received national attention. But most incidents went almost unnoticed outside the communities in which they occurred. Few people believed the crimes were related. And fewer still would realize that all of these families lived within walking distance to a train station. When celebrated true crime expert Bill James first learned about these horrors, he began to investigate others that might fit the same pattern. Applying the same know-how he brings to his legendary baseball analysis, he empirically determined which crimes were committed by the same person. Then after sifting through thousands of local newspapers, court transcripts, and public records, he and his daughter Rachel made an astonishing discovery: they learned the true identity of this monstrous criminal and uncovered one of the deadliest serial killers in America.
 

Voodoo Ben

The African Dream
Was there a black comedy revolution? If there was, wouldn't it have started with Pryor and Murphy who came before In Living Color?
But in the 90's you had Martin, Chris Rock, Def Comedy Jam, Arisno Hall Show, & movies like Friday.
 

Falldog

Wackbag's Best Conservative
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Senlin Ascends has great characters, great setting, but one shitty and 'couldn't care less' plot. THE FUCK DO YOU MEAN THIS BOOK IS 14 HOURS LONG
 
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