What Are You Reading Now?

HandPanzer

τι θελεις
Done dozens and dozens of audio books this year, even did the Wheel of Time again, but decided to do American Gods because of the show. Really interesting book, I really enjoyed it. Has any one else read it?
I read it a while ago and found it enjoyable.
 
The audiobook narrator that did American Gods had a great voice for Wednesday, very similar to McShane's.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
Finally finished The Brothers Karamazov.

Had to abandon it once or twice last year because I didn't have a lot of time to read and it's not a novel you can't really get into reading only 10-15 minutes at a time. So ultimately I had to fight a bit through the first 40%.

That said, I really fell into the second half. The relationships between the characters were amazing, as were their own internal battles with morality. I'll definitely read this one again in a few years.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
The Prince by Machiavelli. Quick, very interesting read. It was certainly unusual reading something completely ignoring any ethical considerations when discussing the governing of a populace.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
Fuck it, starting War and Peace today. Doing a lot of camping/backpacking this year, and work is a somewhat slow (for now), so I'm going to try and get through a few of the major novels by these long-winded Russian fuckers.
 

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss
 

crippledalbino

The God of 42nd Street
Donator
Fuck it, starting War and Peace today. Doing a lot of camping/backpacking this year, and work is a somewhat slow (for now), so I'm going to try and get through a few of the major novels by these long-winded Russian fuckers.
I can only do about 100 pages of that book before I'm so lost and turned around. I wanted to read it and love it. I REALLY did. Just can't get in to/through it.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
I can only do about 100 pages of that book before I'm so lost and turned around. I wanted to read it and love it. I REALLY did. Just can't get in to/through it.
I'm like that with some books, it takes a little acclimation at the start, but usually I can push through it and by 30% I've gotten into a flow.

I have some trouble with these Russian names. I had to look up a few characters in The Brothers Karamazov as I was reading it because I was getting them confused. Plus it seems like everyone had at least two first names in that book.
 
Never thought of it. I guess part of me feels like if I can't read it unabridged, I don't deserve to say I've read it.
Providing a better contextual understanding doesn't make something abridged, does it? I don't mean like a Cliffs Notes version, rather something like a Norton Critical Edition.
 

crippledalbino

The God of 42nd Street
Donator
Providing a better contextual understanding doesn't make something abridged, does it? I don't mean like a Cliffs Notes version, rather something like a Norton Critical Edition.
Maybe, yeah. Hadn't thought about that. Just have the same dense paperback that's been sitting on various tables in my house for the last decade.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
Never thought of it. I guess part of me feels like if I can't read it unabridged, I don't deserve to say I've read it.
There are people who believe that if you can't read it in Russian, you don't deserve to say you've read it.

I can already tell this is going to take multiple reads to really absorb everything, so I'm not worrying about every little detail on this pass. Hell, I'm only 2% in (my Kindle says I have 45 hours left, I have another Moby Dick here), and Tolstoy has already introduced 30 characters.

I'm going to focus on the story, overall philosophical arguments, and primary character interactions/growth, and not worry so much about the historical context or the peripheral characters as much. There are probably better translations I could read at some point also (I got sick of researching them and just went with the Briggs translation out of convenience).
 

crippledalbino

The God of 42nd Street
Donator
There are people who believe that if you can't read it in Russian, you don't deserve to say you've read it.

I can already tell this is going to take multiple reads to really absorb everything, so I'm not worrying about every little detail on this pass. Hell, I'm only 2% in (my Kindle says I have 45 hours left, I have another Moby Dick here), and Tolstoy has already introduced 30 characters.

I'm going to focus on the story, overall philosophical arguments, and primary character interactions/growth, and not worry so much about the historical context or the peripheral characters as much. There are probably better translations I could read at some point also (I got sick of researching them and just went with the Briggs translation out of convenience).
I wonder if a decent audiobook would help warm me up to it? I dunno, I REALLY want to have read this goddamn book at some point. But fuck man, War and fucking Peace.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
I wonder if a decent audiobook would help warm me up to it? I dunno, I REALLY want to have read this goddamn book at some point. But fuck man, War and fucking Peace.
There might be a version that sync the Kindle and Audible so you can switch between the two.

Which translation did you attempt in the past? From my research it sounded like Briggs is the smoothest to read while still holding true to the original, while the Peaver/Volokhonsk translation captures the "artistic" aspects of the book better. My plan is to read the Briggs first, and then maybe in a few years read the P&V translation if I'm so inclined.
 

crippledalbino

The God of 42nd Street
Donator
There might be a version that sync the Kindle and Audible so you can switch between the two.

Which translation did you attempt in the past? From my research it sounded like Briggs is the smoothest to read while still holding true to the original, while the Peaver/Volokhonsk translation captures the "artistic" aspects of the book better. My plan is to read the Briggs first, and then maybe in a few years read the P&V translation if I'm so inclined.
I don't know, it was some maroon paperback that probably doesn't have its cover anymore, and is furthermore probably sitting in a box that I haven't unpacked yet. But that's interesting, I'll check the translation, maybe that's part of my problem, although let's be honest, it's the names that get you. Every single guy's last name is some version of Vladosovic or whatever. I was glad for the couple of parts I read with French because that at least I understood.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
I don't know, it was some maroon paperback that probably doesn't have its cover anymore, and is furthermore probably sitting in a box that I haven't unpacked yet. But that's interesting, I'll check the translation, maybe that's part of my problem, although let's be honest, it's the names that get you. Every single guy's last name is some version of Vladosovic or whatever. I was glad for the couple of parts I read with French because that at least I understood.
Yeah names are the most difficult. I think Amazon is almost to the point where you can click on a name and it will provide a pop-up with a description in context of that specific novel. I already use the Wikipedia/dictionary/translation options a lot when reading these novels.
 

crippledalbino

The God of 42nd Street
Donator
Yeah names are the most difficult. I think Amazon is almost to the point where you can click on a name and it will provide a pop-up with a description in context of that specific novel. I already use the Wikipedia/dictionary/translation options a lot when reading these novels.
Well shit, maybe I need to just break down and buy a Kindle to start with then.
 

whiskeyguy

PR representative for Drunk Whiskeyguy.
Donator
Well shit, maybe I need to just break down and buy a Kindle to start with then.
It helps. I especially like that the footnotes are shown in a pop-up window when you click on them. And of course syncing with my phone is huge, so I can read during lunch at work. I like physical books, but Kindle just makes everything easier.
 
Top