What is your genre?

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
79,203
27,691
898
Seattle
#1
When you read, what do you read?

Most of the books I read fall within the sci-fi and fantasy genres, including alternate history in there. When not on those I lean toward action and adventure. I have no issue with long exposition or lengthy details as long as there are payoffs.

I like whenever they are building a society. Rediscovering old technologies, adapting future tech, survival in inhospitable environments. This began, for me, with Heinlein's Tunnel in the Sky. Great book. Should've made that my fourth.

I like a mystery coupled with a threat, a race to a goal or an execution of a master plan.

I like bullets, magic, lasers and swords. I like huge ships, speedy fighters and high tech vehicles. I almost always lean toward books that have conflict and/or combat.



Okay, your turn.
 

TomC

uppity neobarb
Aug 1, 2006
4,638
1,909
623
Charleston, SC
#2
#1 adventure / super spys / terrorism / good guy(USA) beats bad guy (brown people)
#2 si-fi, the spacy / robots kind, not the alternate/what if kind
#3 fantasy- what ever
#4 young adult-fun reads....for Neon
 

Jacuzzi Billy

Watching PTI
Donator
Mar 22, 2006
42,921
22,270
628
Red Jacuzzi
#3
I like sci-fi, fantasy, and chang most. I'm fairly open to all genres though. One genre I have as always ignored is mystery and I would like to start checking it out.
 

DrewDown

All are welcome
May 3, 2010
10,508
5,818
363
Ohio
#6
I like stuff that makes me think. I spend most of my time working with classical and medieval literature as well as academic studies on the subjects that interest me. Because this stuff tends to be pretty dense, I turn to SF in my leisure time. That said, I don't like my SF to be overly simplistic. It has to offer me something substantial if I'm going to spend time reading it, especially since I spend most of my professional life reading anyways.

The SF I like tends to offer some form of social commentary or some thoughtful analysis of a problem. I don't know what that means exactly, but I want to have an experience when I read and I want to be challenged. My hope is to grow, not just to be entertained. They should be engaging, though.

Examples of books that fit this description: Ursula K. Le Guin's The Dispossessed, Frank Herbert's Dune series, Isaac Asimov's Foundation and Robot books, Cormac McCarthy's The Road, Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars Trilogy, Robert Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land and Starship Troopers, Orson Scott Card's Ender books (at least the first 3), Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five, Stanislaw Lem's Solaris, etc.

I don't mind a bit of fun now and then, but I would always prefer Man in the High Castle and High Rise to something like Ready Player One.

This is part of the reason why fantasy doesn't usually work for me. Tolkein is the obvious exception to that rule. I owe my whole career to my love of Tolkein as a kid. I enjoy George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire, though he really needs a firm editor. I used to really love Raymond E. Feist, but feel like I've outgrown him.

I think I've said this elsewhere, but I have trouble finding good fiction that isn't SF. I played around with Irvine Welsh and Chuck Palahniuk for a while, but their shtick got old for me. I still like Welsh, but Chuck P hasn't written anything good in a loooong time. Survivor is my favorite. I tend to like the fiction of already dead people like Bukowski, Steinbeck, Dostoevsky, Chekov, Hemmingway, Camus, Woolf, and lots of other giants of literature. But I don't need everything I read to be canonical. I just need help sometimes finding good books.

I have enjoyed the book club and general literature discussions on Wackbag because I'm always looking for something new. I found George R.R. Martin through this board a long time ago. More recently, I spotted all the discussion of World War Z and The Passage. I checked both out and I really liked The Passage. In the book club, LiddyRules introduced me to Ballard, for which I'm grateful. BIV gave me the chance to read one of my favorite SF author's most famous book, though he infinitely regrets giving me the opportunity. I'm really hopeful that the book club will continue to offer interesting choices that expand our horizons as readers, constantly offering us something new that we might not otherwise have picked up on our own. That's the point of the whole thing, as I see it. There may be months where I don't participate simply because the winning book doesn't tickle my fancy. I don't think there's any problem with that.

This thing had better not collapse before Falldog goes. I want to see what he comes up with.
 

Falldog

Wackbag's Best Conservative
Donator
May 16, 2007
19,285
6,870
568
Nothern VA
#7
July is going to be a theme month. The idea was to throw some stuff out there that I don't think you guys would normally read but would help provide a better prospective on seldom covered topics.


Though now I'm tempted to rework things because they're not exactly the most discussion generating material.
 

DrewDown

All are welcome
May 3, 2010
10,508
5,818
363
Ohio
#10
July is going to be a theme month. The idea was to throw some stuff out there that I don't think you guys would normally read but would help provide a better prospective on seldom covered topics.


Though now I'm tempted to rework things because they're not exactly the most discussion generating material.

Don't cave to peer pressure.
 

Creasy Bear

gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh
Donator
Mar 10, 2006
49,736
37,900
628
In a porn tree
#11
I like stuff that makes me think. I spend most of my time working with classical and medieval literature as well as academic studies on the subjects that interest me. Because this stuff tends to be pretty dense, I turn to SF in my leisure time. That said, I don't like my SF to be overly simplistic. It has to offer me something substantial if I'm going to spend time reading it, especially since I spend most of my professional life reading anyways.

The SF I like tends to offer some form of social commentary or some thoughtful analysis of a problem. I don't know what that means exactly, but I want to have an experience when I read and I want to be challenged. My hope is to grow, not just to be entertained. They should be engaging, though.

Examples of books that fit this description: Ursula K. Le Guin's The Dispossessed, Frank Herbert's Dune series, Isaac Asimov's Foundation and Robot books, Cormac McCarthy's The Road, Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars Trilogy, Robert Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land and Starship Troopers, Orson Scott Card's Ender books (at least the first 3), Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five, Stanislaw Lem's Solaris, etc.

I don't mind a bit of fun now and then, but I would always prefer Man in the High Castle and High Rise to something like Ready Player One.

This is part of the reason why fantasy doesn't usually work for me. Tolkein is the obvious exception to that rule. I owe my whole career to my love of Tolkein as a kid. I enjoy George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire, though he really needs a firm editor. I used to really love Raymond E. Feist, but feel like I've outgrown him.

I think I've said this elsewhere, but I have trouble finding good fiction that isn't SF. I played around with Irvine Welsh and Chuck Palahniuk for a while, but their shtick got old for me. I still like Welsh, but Chuck P hasn't written anything good in a loooong time. Survivor is my favorite. I tend to like the fiction of already dead people like Bukowski, Steinbeck, Dostoevsky, Chekov, Hemmingway, Camus, Woolf, and lots of other giants of literature. But I don't need everything I read to be canonical. I just need help sometimes finding good books.

I have enjoyed the book club and general literature discussions on Wackbag because I'm always looking for something new. I found George R.R. Martin through this board a long time ago. More recently, I spotted all the discussion of World War Z and The Passage. I checked both out and I really liked The Passage. In the book club, LiddyRules introduced me to Ballard, for which I'm grateful. BIV gave me the chance to read one of my favorite SF author's most famous book, though he infinitely regrets giving me the opportunity. I'm really hopeful that the book club will continue to offer interesting choices that expand our horizons as readers, constantly offering us something new that we might not otherwise have picked up on our own. That's the point of the whole thing, as I see it. There may be months where I don't participate simply because the winning book doesn't tickle my fancy. I don't think there's any problem with that.

This thing had better not collapse before Falldog goes. I want to see what he comes up with.
So what you're saying is you're into scat too, right?
 

TomC

uppity neobarb
Aug 1, 2006
4,638
1,909
623
Charleston, SC
#15
I like stuff that makes me think. I spend most of my time working with classical and medieval literature as well as academic studies on the subjects that interest me. Because this stuff tends to be pretty dense, I turn to SF in my leisure time. That said, I don't like my SF to be overly simplistic. It has to offer me something substantial if I'm going to spend time reading it, especially since I spend most of my professional life reading anyways.

The SF I like tends to offer some form of social commentary or some thoughtful analysis of a problem. I don't know what that means exactly, but I want to have an experience when I read and I want to be challenged. My hope is to grow, not just to be entertained. They should be engaging, though.

Examples of books that fit this description: Ursula K. Le Guin's The Dispossessed, Frank Herbert's Dune series, Isaac Asimov's Foundation and Robot books, Cormac McCarthy's The Road, Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars Trilogy, Robert Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land and Starship Troopers, Orson Scott Card's Ender books (at least the first 3), Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five, Stanislaw Lem's Solaris, etc.

I don't mind a bit of fun now and then, but I would always prefer Man in the High Castle and High Rise to something like Ready Player One.

This is part of the reason why fantasy doesn't usually work for me. Tolkein is the obvious exception to that rule. I owe my whole career to my love of Tolkein as a kid. I enjoy George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire, though he really needs a firm editor. I used to really love Raymond E. Feist, but feel like I've outgrown him.

I think I've said this elsewhere, but I have trouble finding good fiction that isn't SF. I played around with Irvine Welsh and Chuck Palahniuk for a while, but their shtick got old for me. I still like Welsh, but Chuck P hasn't written anything good in a loooong time. Survivor is my favorite. I tend to like the fiction of already dead people like Bukowski, Steinbeck, Dostoevsky, Chekov, Hemmingway, Camus, Woolf, and lots of other giants of literature. But I don't need everything I read to be canonical. I just need help sometimes finding good books.

I have enjoyed the book club and general literature discussions on Wackbag because I'm always looking for something new. I found George R.R. Martin through this board a long time ago. More recently, I spotted all the discussion of World War Z and The Passage. I checked both out and I really liked The Passage. In the book club, LiddyRules introduced me to Ballard, for which I'm grateful. BIV gave me the chance to read one of my favorite SF author's most famous book, though he infinitely regrets giving me the opportunity. I'm really hopeful that the book club will continue to offer interesting choices that expand our horizons as readers, constantly offering us something new that we might not otherwise have picked up on our own. That's the point of the whole thing, as I see it. There may be months where I don't participate simply because the winning book doesn't tickle my fancy. I don't think there's any problem with that.

This thing had better not collapse before Falldog goes. I want to see what he comes up with.
Wow, Do I feel like a big old dummy.

I can hear some pale girl saying " you know nothing, Tom snow" in my head.
 

Voodoo Ben

You gotta wash your ass
Dec 5, 2010
8,422
6,790
293
#21
true crime, Sci-fi, horror, & mystery.
 

tattered

Uber-Aryan
Wackbag Staff
Aug 22, 2002
24,582
8,688
918
JERZ
#24
Im more of a military sci fi reader. It just really holds my attention
 

Konstantin K

Big League Poster
Aug 25, 2010
15,776
3,875
273
#25
Does Where's Waldo? count as a genre?