What Should I Read?

LiddyRules

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#1
Here's the premise for this thread. Sometimes we are debating things whether to read Book A or Book B. So we ask other posters their opinion on what should be our next book.

I'm thinking of reading a biography on a President. Maybe Teddy Roosevelt. Thoughts?
 

Stormrider666

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#2
Here's the premise for this thread. Sometimes we are debating things whether to read Book A or Book B. So we ask other posters their opinion on what should be our next book.

I'm thinking of reading a biography on a President. Maybe Teddy Roosevelt. Thoughts?
He is one of my favorite Presidents and if I were to read a biography about one it would be his.
 

Tetro

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Biography on a president? I would have to think The Years of Lyndon Johnson. You could start with book 1: The Path to Power. I don't have the time to even mention the amount of accolades that series has received.
 

BIV

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#6
 
Aug 5, 2004
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Teddy is a great choice and there is an amazing series of three books written by Edmund Morris. If you are going to read up on Teddy that's the series you should do. Each book is like 800-900 pages, but incredibly well written.

The first book, "The Rise of TR" is probably one of the best books I have ever read. Honestly, you probably could have a monkey write this book and it still would have been amazing. The dude's life growing up and into his VP was the shit adventure stories are made of.

The second book, "Theodore Rex" is again, well written. The material is certainly more dry than the first book but still very good and really puts you in the time period.

The third book, "Colonel Roosevelt", I'm honestly having a tough time getting through but it's not the books fault. I'm starting and stopping too much. Dance of Dragons got in the way, then I felt like reading up on string theory, now the passage.. I've been all over the place lately. I'll get back to it (about 200 pages into 900+).

I'm sure there are other well written books but this is the grand-daddy if you are going to read up on him.
 

whiskeyguy

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Thinking I'm going to jump back into sci-fi. I think I'm going to read Wool by Howey... I just want to see what all the fuss is about. However, there are a few others on my list I might read instead. BIV, you started threads on a couple of these... where do you think I should begin?

Hyperion - Simmons. Already on my Kindle, and besides Wool this one is probably at the top of the list right now.

Foundation - Asimov

Honor Harrington - Weber
 

Neon

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#9
My feelings on Hyperion are well known, and Foundation is an utter classic. Both have multiple sequels, by the way.
 

BIV

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#10
Thinking I'm going to jump back into sci-fi. I think I'm going to read Wool by Howey... I just want to see what all the fuss is about. However, there are a few others on my list I might read instead. BIV, you started threads on a couple of these... where do you think I should begin?

Hyperion - Simmons. Already on my Kindle, and besides Wool this one is probably at the top of the list right now.

Foundation - Asimov

Honor Harrington - Weber
Well...I'm bias.

#1 Weber is one of my favorite authors and Harrington one of my favorite series. BTW, his empire of man series is more easily digestible to the average reader while still being very, very good. Weber can get quite technical and, especially in the later books, goes into depth about politics and history. The technical stuff really makes the battles pop and are worth every word. The politics often turn people off.

#2 I'm never read the other two, they are on my short long list.
 

whiskeyguy

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My feelings on Hyperion are well known, and Foundation is an utter classic. Both have multiple sequels, by the way.
Well...I'm bias.

#1 Weber is one of my favorite authors and Harrington one of my favorite series. BTW, his empire of man series is more easily digestible to the average reader while still being very, very good. Weber can get quite technical and, especially in the later books, goes into depth about politics and history. The technical stuff really makes the battles pop and are worth every word. The politics often turn people off.

#2 I'm never read the other two, they are on my short long list.
How about "commitment"/ease of reading? Do the novels in any of these series stand alone well, or should you read them one after another? I prefer read one book at a time in a series, usually. Also Biv you mentioned Weber can get pretty technical... is it to the point that it takes you out of the story? You seen to enjoy it a lot, but I'd prefer something that flows pretty well right now. If I'm going to read something that feels more grinding I'll go back and try to finish Moby Dick.

And Neon, I think it was Foundation where the order just confused the living hell out of me. Is that the one with all these sequels/prequels written out of turn? Do you recommend reading based on published date or going with the story timeline?
 

Neon

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#14
How about "commitment"/ease of reading? Do the novels in any of these series stand alone well, or should you read them one after another? I prefer read one book at a time in a series, usually. Also Biv you mentioned Weber can get pretty technical... is it to the point that it takes you out of the story? You seen to enjoy it a lot, but I'd prefer something that flows pretty well right now. If I'm going to read something that feels more grinding I'll go back and try to finish Moby Dick.

And Neon, I think it was Foundation where the order just confused the living hell out of me. Is that the one with all these sequels/prequels written out of turn? Do you recommend reading based on published date or going with the story timeline?
Maybe you could try Gridlinked by Neal Asher (the first in the Ian Cormac polity novels). Like James Bond in the far future where humanity is governed by a benevolent dictatorship of AIs. More pulpy and actiony but not dumbed down. They also each have self contained stories but essentially have an overarching plot (think of it like different seasons of the same show), so you can read one and then walk away and come back later, and they aren't particularly long. There are five in all, and I found them to be very fast paced, imaginative, and pretty god damn epic. The villains just get crazier and crazier until it is all out pandemonium.
 

whiskeyguy

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#15
Maybe you could try Gridlinked by Neal Asher (the first in the Ian Cormac polity novels). Like James Bond in the far future where humanity is governed by a benevolent dictatorship of AIs. More pulpy and actiony but not dumbed down. They also each have self contained stories but essentially have an overarching plot (think of it like different seasons of the same show), so you can read one and then walk away, and they aren't particularly long. There are five in all, and I found them to be very fast paced, imaginative, and pretty god damn epic.
Cool, I'll check those out also.

You know, the reasonable thing would be read the 2nd and 3rd Ender's Game books. I don't know why I have so many series going at once, and if those are anything like the first I'll enjoy them and knock them out pretty fast.
 

Neon

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Cool, I'll check those out also.

You know, the reasonable thing would be read the 2nd and 3rd Ender's Game books. I don't know why I have so many series going at once, and if those are anything like the first I'll enjoy them and knock them out pretty fast.
The rest of the Ender series is less universally loved than the original. I personally think that Speaker for the Dead is nearly as strong as Ender's Game but for different reasons, and I also like Xenocide and Children of the Mind (which many people didn't enjoy at all).
 

Lord Zero

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#18
He is one of my favorite Presidents
Why? He was an authoritarian piece of shit who started the pattern of government attacking industry and Presidents waving unilateral power around in the face of Congress. Teddy Roosevelt was one of our all-time worst Presidents.
 

BIV

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#19
How about "commitment"/ease of reading? Do the novels in any of these series stand alone well, or should you read them one after another? I prefer read one book at a time in a series, usually. Also Biv you mentioned Weber can get pretty technical... is it to the point that it takes you out of the story? You seen to enjoy it a lot, but I'd prefer something that flows pretty well right now. If I'm going to read something that feels more grinding I'll go back and try to finish Moby Dick.
There is certainly an amount of grind in the Harringtons, especially later in the series. The first few, not so much. Again, it's usually the political stuff.

As for the technical stuff...IMO, no it doesn't take you out. Others might disagree with me. But, here is the thing, Weber never writes anything that isn't going to be used. Do you know how sidewalls work? Impellar wedges? The range of light speed weapons? How missiles work? Of course you don't. But you will. So when the actual battles happen, he never has to explain anything. He just tells you what is going on and since you have been educated already, those battles become extremely vivid.

That being said, if you want an easy read, this series probably isn't it.

Meanwhile, the other series I mentioned, Weber's Empire of Man series (first novel is March Upcountry, available as a free eBook online) is nothing but killing fun and death.

On a totally separate note, The Old Man's War series is some very hard core sci-fi which also happens to be a pretty easy read.

Marshall S. Thomas also has a good Sci-fi series called the "Soldier of the Legion" series. Soldier of the Legion is also the name of the first book. Powered armor, mini nuke weapons, pirates, evil governments soldiers and aliens. Love, lust, blood and guts. Another book in the Old Man's War/Starship Troopers genre.
 

whiskeyguy

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#20
The rest of the Ender series is less universally loved than the original. I personally think that Speaker for the Dead is nearly as strong as Ender's Game but for different reasons, and I also like Xenocide and Children of the Mind (which many people didn't enjoy at all).
I think it was you who recommended just reading the first 4 or 5 in a previous discussion, which I'll probably do.

There is certainly an amount of grind in the Harringtons, especially later in the series. The first few, not so much. Again, it's usually the political stuff.

As for the technical stuff...IMO, no it doesn't take you out. Others might disagree with me. But, here is the thing, Weber never writes anything that isn't going to be used. Do you know how sidewalls work? Impellar wedges? The range of light speed weapons? How missiles work? Of course you don't. But you will. So when the actual battles happen, he never has to explain anything. He just tells you what is going on and since you have been educated already, those battles become extremely vivid.

That being said, if you want an easy read, this series probably isn't it.

Meanwhile, the other series I mentioned, Weber's Empire of Man series (first novel is March Upcountry, available as a free eBook online) is nothing but killing fun and death.

On a totally separate note, The Old Man's War series is some very hard core sci-fi which also happens to be a pretty easy read.

Marshall S. Thomas also has a good Sci-fi series called the "Soldier of the Legion" series. Soldier of the Legion is also the name of the first book. Powered armor, mini nuke weapons, pirates, evil governments soldiers and aliens. Love, lust, blood and guts. Another book in the Old Man's War/Starship Troopers genre.
Yeah Harrington sounds great but that's something I'll probably save for after the new year when winter is in full swing and I'll have the time/motivation to really dive into reading. Right now a lot of my reading is in 10-20 minute increments, which makes it a little harder to read those more technical novels.
 

BIV

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#21
Anything catch people's eye here?

*Note: Not all folders are named by me.

I wish there was a way to print a txt doc that listed all of a folder's files.


 

Wrecktum

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#22
I'm currently reading The Second Chronicles of Thomas Covenant. Just finished the First Chronicles. Think Tolkien high fantasy with a total scumbag for a main character. It has alot of the same LOTR'S themes powerful ring, unwilling hero cast into a adventure, and powerful villain in charge of a pretty massive army. But there are no cute elves, funny dwarfs. Bring a thesaurus if you wanna read the books.