When a Brit Tabloid Goes Too Far...It Goes Too Far (Murdoch Withdraws BSkyB Bid)

LiddyRules

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http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/Bu...B_Following_News_Of_The_World_Hacking_Scandal

News Corporation has withdrawn its bid for BSkyB after deciding it could not continue in the wake of the phone hacking scandal.

A senior source who had been working on the offer told Sky's City editor Mark Kleinman the situation had become "too politicised" for News Corp to move forward.

"My disclosure that News Corp had withdrawn its interest in taking over BSkyB feels, with hindsight, like an inevitability given the escalating scandal," commented Kleinman.

The decision was later confirmed by the media group, which said the "current climate" prevented a further approach.

A Downing Street spokesman said: "We welcome the news. As the Prime Minister has said, the business should focus on clearing up the mess and getting its own house in order."

Labour leader Ed Miliband described the decision as "a victory for people up and down this country who have been appalled by the phone hacking scandal".

A statement confirming the move read: "News Corporation announces that it no longer intends to make an offer for the entire issued and to be issued share capital of British Sky Broadcasting Group PLC ("BSkyB") not already owned by it."

News Corp has a 39% stake in BSkyB and had been trying to buy the remaining shares, having tabled a 700p-a-share offer in June last year.

Deputy chairman Chase Carey commented: "We believed that the proposed acquisition of BSkyB by News Corporation would benefit both companies but it has become clear that it is too difficult to progress in this climate."

News Corp remains a "committed long-term shareholder in BSkyB", he said.

Kleinman noted that by issuing the statement, News Corp would be prohibited from bidding for the part of BSkyB it does not already own for at least six months under the rules that govern takeovers.

He added that the withdrawal was very bad news for hedge funds who had piled into BSkyB shares, hoping for a knockout bid.

Commenting on the decision, Sky's political editor Adam Boulton said: "To answer the question 'has News Corp outmanoeuvred the Government?', one would have to say comprehensively, no.

"Remember the acquisition of BSkyB - which would have been the biggest and single most profitable division within News Corp - was the strategic plan for the future.

"It was the growth plan for the future and effectively the succession plan."

Boulton added that the situation had been a "trial of strength" in which public and political opinion had prevailed over corporate strategy.
He also ceased the publication of News of the World.

I don't know if anyone else is following the story, I find it interesting.
 

Party Rooster

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#2
I don't know if anyone else is following the story, I find it interesting.
At first I just thought it was the British libs trying to sensationalize what was going on but it appears they REALLY fucked up. I'm surprised it hasn't gotten more attention by our mainstream media being that it's a Murdoch venture.

I don't think our culture gets how the British media works. Even their more "mainstream" ones pretty much wear their biases on their sleeve. Our tabloids are immediately dismissed as being in the "Bat Boy" category, but even News of the World had a lot of actual journalistic scoops. But it's amazing that this scandal has brought down a 168 year old paper like this.
 

Stormrider666

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#3
At first I just thought it was the British libs trying to sensationalize what was going on but it appears they REALLY fucked up. I'm surprised it hasn't gotten more attention by our mainstream media being that it's a Murdoch venture.

I don't think our culture gets how the British media works. Even their more "mainstream" ones pretty much wear their biases on their sleeve. Our tabloids are immediately dismissed as being in the "Bat Boy" category, but even News of the World had a lot of actual journalistic scoops. But it's amazing that this scandal has brought down a 168 year old paper like this.
They have been talking about it on CNN, NBC Nightly News, and MSNBC.

I just find it funny that nobody had problem with what News of the World was doing when it was happening to politicians, celebrities, and the Royal family. But as soon as it started happening to the average Joe, all hell broke loose.
 

Party Rooster

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#4
They have been talking about it on CNN, NBC Nightly News, and MSNBC.
Only really the last couple of weeks. And I usually only watch Fox, don't see a lot of coverage of it on there...:icon_cool

I just find it funny that nobody had problem with what News of the World was doing when it was happening to politicians, celebrities, and the Royal family. But as soon as it started happening to the average Joe, all hell broke loose.
There isn't that same expectation of privacy with public figgers. And hacking into the kidnapped girls phone and deleting the messages so more could come in was pretty fucked up. The family thought she was still alive because they could tell someone was deleting the messages, and then they found out she was dead the whole time.
 

English Gent

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but even News of the World had a lot of actual journalistic scoops. But it's amazing that this scandal has brought down a 168 year old paper like this.
It's a bloody shame that it will be remembered for this scandal because, as you say, it's done some fucking great investigative journalism over the years (as have most of the supposedly low-rent tabloids, actually). It looks like they just got so accustomed to mining people's voicemails for dirt that they just did it to everyone. It'll be interesting to hear how the 9/11 victims and families hacking allegations pan out now.
 

Stormrider666

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#6
Only really the last couple of weeks. And I usually only watch Fox, don't see a lot of coverage of it on there...:icon_cool

There isn't that same expectation of privacy with public figgers. And hacking into the kidnapped girls phone and deleting the messages so more could come in was pretty fucked up. The family thought she was still alive because they could tell someone was deleting the messages, and then they found out she was dead the whole time.
I agree that hacking into the dead girl's phone was fucked up and the differences in expectation of privacy when it comes to public figures. But people almost snickering and taking delight in seeing public figures' phones being hacked into. Then turning around acting shocked and outraged when it turns out that NOTW was doing it to private people comes off a little hypocritical.
 

Don the Radio Guy

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The fallacy of "unbiased" media is a uniquely American thing. I wouldn't bet my last dollar that this sort of thing happens all the time in every singe UK newsroom.
 

English Gent

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I agree that hacking into the dead girl's phone was fucked up and the differences in expectation of privacy when it comes to public figures. But people almost snickering and taking delight in seeing public figures' phones being hacked into. Then turning around acting shocked and outraged when it turns out that NOTW was doing it to private people comes off a little hypocritical.
Honestly, I didn't really get any sense of delight from the UK public about politicians' phones getting hacked, though I do agree that the public went fucking wild with anger when they found out the the murdered schoolgirl, Milly Dowler, had had her phone hacked. People were concerned about it even when we had only heard about celebs and politicians, but hacking murdered schoolgirls, 7/7 bombing victims, etc, took it to a whole new level.

Oh, and you guys might be pleased to learn that Piers Morgan has now been implicated...............
 

English Gent

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The fallacy of "unbiased" media is a uniquely American thing. I wouldn't bet my last dollar that this sort of thing happens all the time in every singe UK newsroom.
It's pretty clear that it happened in a lot of newsrooms, but there are definitely media outlets that would touch that kind of thing with a barge pole: mainstream TV channels, most of the broadsheets, etc. A few of the broadsheets and a couple of the tabloids are more or less straight down the middle politically but, yeah, a few wear their biases on their sleeves.
 

Don the Radio Guy

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I'd also be willing to bet that sort of thing happens in many newsrooms here in the US. Any business where people get paid and make promotions on having a story first, they will do anything to achieve that end. It's human nature.
 

Party Rooster

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#11
It's a bloody shame that it will be remembered for this scandal because, as you say, it's done some fucking great investigative journalism over the years (as have most of the supposedly low-rent tabloids, actually). It looks like they just got so accustomed to mining people's voicemails for dirt that they just did it to everyone. It'll be interesting to hear how the 9/11 victims and families hacking allegations pan out now.
At first I thought you were confusing your 7/7 victims with our 9/11 victims. But it looks like Jay Rockefeller is calling for a congressional investigation into it. Hope I get to find out before he eliminates the internet. :icon_cool

The fallacy of "unbiased" media is a uniquely American thing. I wouldn't bet my last dollar that this sort of thing happens all the time in every singe UK newsroom.
So you're saying this doesn't happen in every single newsroom?

Oh, and you guys might be pleased to learn that Piers Morgan has now been implicated...............
Conservative smokescreen. ;)
 

LiddyRules

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Oh, and you guys might be pleased to learn that Piers Morgan has now been implicated...............
If a couple of Bobbies come onto his CNN show and arrest him live, that might be the greatest tv moment ever.
 

Party Rooster

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Aw shit. Murdoch dun goofed if a prominent Republican is even jumping on board with this...

GOPer wants FBI probe of Rupert Murdoch

Senators are calling for an investigation on the 9/11 allegations. | AP Photo Close
By SEUNG MIN KIM | 7/13/11 1:58 PM EDT Updated: 7/13/11 4:01 PM EDT

New York Republican Pete King is calling on the FBI to investigate whether Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation hacked into the voicemail accounts of Sept. 11 victims, calling the allegations of the scandal “disgraceful.”

“As I see it, I would expect more things to be coming out over the next several weeks,” King told POLITICO. “And as we approach 9/11, the tenth anniversary, it’s even going to get worse.”

King said in the letter, addressed to FBI Director Robert Mueller, that the journalists should face felony charges if the allegations are proven true.

“It is revolting to imagine that members of the media would seek to compromise the integrity of a public official for financial gain in the pursuit of yellow journalism,” wrote King, who is also chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee.

A number of Democratic senators are also calling for inquiries into the scandal. Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) is calling on Attorney General Eric Holder to investigate. Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W. Va.), who chairs the Senate Commerce Committee, asked for an investigation on Tuesday into whether American phones were hacked by News Corp. reporters. Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) says she supports Rockefeller. Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J) wants authorities to look into allegations that News of the World reporters bribed London police for information about the British royal family.

The Daily Mirror in London reported that News of the World journalists tried to get phone data involving the victims of the terror attacks.

“It is horrifying to consider the possibility that the victims of the 9/11 tragedy would be victimized again by an international newspaper seeking information about their personal suffering,” Menendez wrote in his letter.

In his letter, Lautenberg expressed “deep concerns” about the bribery accusations, noting that if true, that could violate the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which bars a U.S. company from paying foreign officials in exchange for business.

Even if the reporters were stationed in England, Lautenberg noted that News Corporation itself, since it’s based in the United States, would be subject to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

“The limited information already reported in this case raises serious questions about the legality of the conduct of News Corporation and its subsidiaries under the FCPA,” Lautenberg writes in the two-page letter sent to the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission. “Further investigation may reveal that current reports only scratch the surface of the problem at News Corporation.”

Lautenberg also said he was concerned about the allegations involving the phone-hacking of Sept. 11 victims, calling it “troubling.”

News Corp. declined to comment on the senators’ calls.

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0711/58904.html#ixzz1S1xyv3O2
 

LiddyRules

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State of Play 2: This Time We've Pissed Off The Feds

It was a BBC miniseries first. It had both Sam Tyler AND Gene Hunt, plus new Prof. X, the chick from Boardwalk Empire and Trainspotting, the chick from Caprica and Rome, and Bill Nighy.
 

Party Rooster

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Heads be rollin'...

Murdoch aide Brooks quits as head of UK newspapers
Reuters
By Keith Weir and Georgina Prodhan | Reuters – 5 hrs ago

LONDON (Reuters) - Rebekah Brooks resigned as chief executive of News International on Friday, yielding to political and investor pressure over a phone hacking scandal that has shaken Rupert Murdoch's media empire on both sides of the Atlantic.

The 43-year-old Brooks, a former editor of the scandal-hit News of the World and of flagship daily tabloid The Sun, was a close confidante of Murdoch, who described her as his first priority when he flew in to London this week to manage the crisis at News Corp's British newspaper unit.

In her place, he named a trusted News Corp veteran, New Zealander Tom Mockridge, who has spent the past eight years running the group's Sky Italia television interests in Italy.

The public disgust that erupted over reports that the News of the World may have hacked into the voicemails of murder victims and other vulnerable people prompted Murdoch to shut down the paper and pull a $12-billion bid to buy the 61 percent of British pay-TV broadcaster BSkyB he does not own.

Speaking before Brooks's resignation to the Wall Street Journal, which he owns, Murdoch defended the way his managers had handled the crisis. He spoke of "minor mistakes" and dismissed suggestions, floated by some shareholders, that he should sell off the troublesome newspaper businesses on which his empire was founded but which bring in only limited profits.

British Prime Minister David Cameron is under fire for his personal relationship with Brooks as well as for hiring another ex-editor of the News of the World as his spokesman. He has now launched a judicial inquiry into the affair, which also includes allegations of corrupt payments to police by journalists.

Struggling to quell the crisis, News International chairman James Murdoch, 38-year-old son of the founder, said the company would take out adverts in rival newspapers this weekend to say sorry: "We will apologize to the nation for what has happened," James Murdoch said in a statement.

His father endorsed his handling of a crisis.

Rupert Murdoch, 80, has been courted for decades by Britain's political elite as a kingmaker who could influence voters to shift left or right. He now faces a showdown with parliament on Tuesday when lawmakers on the media committee grill him, his son and Brooks. During an angry debate this week, one legislator called him a "cancer on the body politic."

BROOKS LEAVES THE BRIDGE

Brooks, whose youth, mane of red hair and sharp tongue have helped give her a high public profile in Britain, said in a message to staff: "My desire to remain on the bridge has made me a focal point of the debate. This is now detracting attention from all our honest endeavors to fix the problems of the past.

"Therefore I have given Rupert and James Murdoch my resignation. While it has been a subject of discussion, this time my resignation has been accepted."

She said she felt "a deep sense of responsibility for the people we have hurt."

That sounded like an acknowledgement that the News of the World's invasions of private voicemails may have gone well beyond those of the royal aides whose complaints led to the jailing of a reporter and an investigator in 2007. Police say they are now probing where another 4,000 people -- including victims of notorious crimes, bombings and war -- were targeted.

A week ago, Brooks had told News of the World staff, who were sacked with the paper's closure, that she would remain to try and resolve the company's problems -- causing anger among many of the 200 being laid off. Some accused Murdoch of sacrificing their jobs to save hers.

Mockridge, who will replace Brooks, has spent two decades in News Corp. Analysts may welcome the New Zealander's recent background in television, an area in which News Corp is keen to expand, as well as his lack of direct involvement in the scandal-hit British newspaper business during the past decade.

Prime Minister Cameron welcomed Brooks' resignation. Cameron often socialized with Brooks and her husband in their country homes, but has sought to distance himself from her as the scandal tarnished his image. His judgment has also been in question for hiring her successor at News of the World as his spokesman. Andy Coulson was arrested last week in the affair.

MISTAKES MADE

As well as its published apology this weekend, the company would also write to its commercial partners to update them on its actions, James Murdoch said. Many advertisers had said they would boycott the News of the World before the company killed it off and refused paid advertising in last Sunday's final edition.

Some advertisers had also questioned their spending in other titles, notably the Sun, Britain's best-selling newspaper.

"The Company has made mistakes," James Murdoch wrote to staff. "It is not only receiving appropriate scrutiny, but is also responding to unfair attacks by setting the record straight."

The left-leading Guardian, which brought many of the most damaging allegations to light against the News of the World, published an apology to the Sun on Friday, retracting a report that the paper might have hacked into former prime minister Gordon Brown's family medical records to run a story on his son.

Analysts said Brooks should have gone sooner. Her departure now would raise further questions, some said: "The resignation of Rebekah Brooks raises two important questions," said Ivor Gaber, a professor of journalism at City University London.

"Firstly, why did she take so long to do this? Secondly, is this unrelated to her summons to appear before the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee?"

News Corp declined to comment on Brooks's severance package, but analysts said it is expected to include a confidentiality clause -- although she does still plan to give evidence to the parliamentary committee next Tuesday.

Jennifer McDermott, a partner with law firm Withers and veteran media lawyer, said: "They can't say she can't talk to committees and things because she's doing that on oath. Confidentiality agreements can only bind people so far."

"I would expect that there will be a clause about trying to limit what she can say and to stop her suddenly bad-mouthing other News Corp executives, for example. But she's got to be free to speak and tell the truth to these inquiries."

"NO LASTING DAMAGE"

Murdoch struck a defiant tone on Friday, saying his media empire would recover from a scandal over alleged phone hacking crimes at the News of the World and an FBI inquiry into similar allegations in the United States.

He has denied that News Corp was drawing up plans to separate its newspaper holdings, which are at the heart of the controversy, from the rest of the company.

It includes the Fox broadcast network in the United States, the 20th Century Fox film studio and newspapers around the world, including The Wall Street Journal, the New York Post and Britain's The Times and the Sun tabloid.

Murdoch said News Corp had handled the crisis "extremely well in every way possible" making just "minor mistakes" and called reports he would split off his newspaper assets "pure rubbish."

Speaking to the Wall Street Journal, Murdoch said his son James had acted "as fast as he could, the moment he could" to deal with the scandal.

Murdoch, who is still in London managing the crisis, said damage to the company was "nothing that will not be recovered."

"We have a reputation of great good works in this country," he added.

However, rival publishers are seeking to capitalize on the company's weakness.

Britain's Daily Mail & General Trust is planning a new mass-market Sunday tabloid to fill the gap left by the News of the World, which had a weekly sale of around 2.7 million.

A source told Reuters the newspaper could be published as early as next weekend if a dummy run this weekend went well.

SPELL BROKEN

The Murdochs' hold over British politics appears to have been broken by the scandal, at least for the time being.

They were forced to agree to appear before parliament after Prime Minister Cameron said they should attend and as politicians across the political spectrum united in denouncing the hacking that initially had seemed to focus on celebrities and politicians but has become seen as far more widespread.

Murdoch said lies had been told about his company in the British parliament and that he wanted to put the record straight: "We think it's important to absolutely establish our integrity in the eyes of the public," he told the Journal.

London's Metropolitan Police faced embarrassment after it emerged that a former News of the World deputy editor arrested on Thursday had worked as a media adviser to the force.

Police chief Paul Stephenson was given a 90-minute dressing down by London mayor Boris Johnson on Thursday and is expected to appear before another parliament committee next week.

http://news.yahoo.com/murdochs-face-uk-government-inquiry-fbi-probe-news-023113974.html
 

Stormrider666

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Although its been a long time coming, I'm actually surprised that Brooks finally quit. I have this sneaking suspicion that Murdoch was banging her and didn't want to fire her because of the "hell hath no fury like a woman scorned" saying. She probably knows where some bodies are buried.
 

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Deflection at its finest,

[YT]n9gOSsvLIO4[/YT]
 

LiddyRules

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Head of Scotland Yard steps down

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB100...51732627388162.html?mod=WSJ_hp_LEFTTopStories

LONDON—The head of Scotland Yard stepped down on Sunday and Rebekah Brooks—a close confidante of News Corp.'s top executive, Rupert Murdoch—was arrested as a convulsive phone-hacking scandal raced into the loftiest ranks of Britain's business and law-enforcement worlds.

The surprise resignation of Metropolitan Police Commissioner Paul Stephenson came amid a spreading onslaught of allegations that some members of his force were corrupt and had forged too-close ties with the discredited newspaper at the heart of the scandal, News Corp.'s now-defunct News of the World.

Ms. Brooks is at the center of a web of political and media elite that has come under intense scrutiny as details have spilled out about the lengths to which British newspapers have gone to get scoops and the cozy ties that may have protected their actions.

She was arrested Sunday in connection with the central allegations in the saga: the illegal intercepting of phone voice mails and the alleged bribery of police officials by News of the World, a paper she once edited. More recently she headed News Corp.'s U.K. newspaper group, until resigning on Friday. Her friendship with U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron has become emblematic of the close ties between politicians and the press.

A spokesman for Ms. Brooks said "she is assisting police."

Police released Ms. Brooks around midnight Sunday, local time. No charges were filed.

The former police commissioner, Sir Paul, said: "I may wish we had done some things differently, but I will not lose sleep over my personal integrity."

Sunday's events come just days before British police officials and current News Corp. executives, as well as Ms. Brooks, are expected to face a grilling by politicians at parliamentary-committee hearings over their handling of the scandal. Ms. Brooks is scheduled to appear at one of the hearings on Tuesday alongside Mr. Murdoch and his son, James Murdoch, News Corp.'s deputy chief operating officer.

Following Ms. Brooks's arrest Sunday, the chairman of Parliament's Culture, Media and Sport committee was seeking legal advice as to whether Ms. Brooks could still attend and, if so, what kind of questions she would be able to answer, according to a person familiar with the matter.

The trio will face questions about the hacking and whether News Corp. officials previously misled Parliament.

Executives from the firm's U.K. newspaper business, News International, as recently as 2009 told the committee that the phone hacking was limited to just one reporter at the News of the World.

The committee also has previously asked Ms. Brooks about payments to police. In 2003, when she was the editor of another News Corp. tabloid, the Sun, she told the committee: "We have paid the police for information in the past."

At the time, she didn't elaborate on that statement. In April, Ms. Brooks said in a letter to lawmakers that her intention was to comment on a "widely held belief" rather than suggest she knew of specific cases of payments to police.

James Murdoch earlier this month said that News of the World and News International had failed to "get to the bottom of repeated wrongdoing that occurred" and, as a result, "wrongly maintained that these issues were confined to one reporter." The company now had handed police evidence that he believed "will prove that this is untrue," he said.

News Corp. owns Dow Jones & Co. and The Wall Street Journal.

For Scotland Yard, the resignation of Sir Paul from his senior position pushes the scandal further into difficult terrain. The Metropolitan Police Service (Scotland Yard's formal name) has come under fire from politicians for failing to investigate the phone-hacking issue thoroughly in 2006 and, more recently, for allegedly taking bribes from the News of the World. In recent weeks, Scotland Yard opened an investigation into the possibility that police officers accepted bribes from journalists in connection with the News of the World phone-hacking scandal.

The police have also come under fire for hiring a former News Corp. tabloid editor to advise the police on public relations. That editor, Neil Wallis, last week was arrested in connection with the criminal investigation.

A lawyer for Mr. Wallis declined to comment on the allegations his client faces. Mr. Wallis hasn't been charged.

Sir Paul said he first met Mr. Wallis in 2006, when he still worked at the News of the World, to discuss policing, as he did with other journalists. In 2009, after Mr. Wallis left the paper, Scotland Yard entered into a contractual arrangement with Mr. Wallis that ended in 2010. "I played no role in the letting or management of that contract," Sir Paul said on Sunday.

News Corp head Rupert Murdoch apologizes to family of Millie Dowler as hacking scandal claims more top executives. Video courtesy of Reuters.

Of the phone-hacking investigation, Sir Paul said "I had no knowledge of, or involvement in, the original investigation into phone hacking in 2006 that successfully led to the conviction and imprisonment of two men. I had no reason to believe this was anything other than a successful investigation."

Scotland Yard "is in an awkward position," said Peter Alldridge, professor of law at Queen Mary University of London. "It could be the most serious crisis in confidence that U.K. has had with its police force in a long time."

The saga dates back six years but rose to a new level recently with the allegation that the News of the World in 2002 hacked the voice mail of a missing 13-year-old girl who turned out to be dead. Ms. Brooks was the editor of News of the World at the time.

Ms. Brooks is a longtime protégé of Mr. Murdoch who had risen quickly through the tabloid ranks of News Corp.'s British newspaper operations. Mr. Murdoch defended her strongly in the days before her resignation.

Police will likely question Ms. Brooks not just on her involvement but about executives at the company up the chain of command, to learn who knew what, when, said several legal experts.

News Corp.'s U.K. headquarters, where officials have been in crisis mode.

Several other News International executives have given witness statements to police, a person familiar with the matter said, without specifying who those people were.

Ms. Brooks is the 10th person arrested by police since they re-opened an investigation in January. Others arrested include former News of the World editor Andy Coulson, a former top aide to U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron, as well as several former editors and senior reporters. All have been released without charge.

In the U.K., individuals can be arrested without being charged. An arrest signals the person has moved to being a suspect from being a witness. Formal charges may or may not result; that process can take days or months.

Home Secretary Theresa May plans to make a statement in Parliament on Monday about Scotland Yard, a spokeswoman said.

Ms. May will tell lawmakers about her concerns over issues such as the police's use of Mr. Wallis to advise on public relations, a person familiar with the matter said.
 
Dec 8, 2004
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#21
And....

Yates quits Met amid hacking row



Assistant Commissioner John Yates decided not to re-open the phone-hacking investigation in 2009


Met Police Assistant Commissioner John Yates has resigned as the phone-hacking scandal fall-out continues.

He checked the credentials of Neil Wallis before the Met employed the ex-News of the World executive, arrested last week over hacking allegations.

Mr Yates indicated his intention to resign to the chairman of the Met Police Authority, which was accepted.

Mr Yates's decison to quit comes after Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson resigned on Sunday.

The resignation of Sir Paul, the most senior policeman in Britain, came after he faced criticism for the recruitment of Mr Wallis as a PR consultant.

Mr Wallis, a former NoW deputy editor, was arrested and released on bail on Thursday on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications.

Mr Yates's resignation came after he was informed he would be suspended pending an inquiry into his relationship with Mr Wallis.

The officer had been confronted with new information about the friendship between the two men, sources told BBC political editor Nick Robinson.

Mayor of London Boris Johnson's spokesman said Mr Yates's decision to resign was "regrettable, but the right call".

Scotland Yard said in a statement: "Assistant Commissioner John Yates has this afternoon indicated his intention to resign to the chair of the MPA.

"This has been accepted. AC Yates will make a statement later this afternoon."
Link
 

Ego

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#22

Rebekah Brooks


Shaun White

[video=youtube;7g9WjcGdxuM]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7g9WjcGdxuM[/video]
 

Hoffman

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