Why not legalize pot?

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
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#1
Good read.

Why not legalize pot?

By LZ Granderson, CNN Contributor
updated 12:46 AM EDT, Tue October 30, 2012

A man joins other pro-marijuana activists in smoking pot at a rally in San Francisco to legalize the drug.
Editor's note: LZ Granderson, who writes a weekly column for CNN.com, was named journalist of the year by the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association and is a 2011 Online Journalism Award finalist for commentary. He is a senior writer and columnist for ESPN the Magazine and ESPN.com. Follow him on Twitter: @locs_n_laughs

(CNN) -- I have smoked pot.

Not today or this week, or even this month, but I have. I'm telling you this because before I begin talking about the pot-smoking habits of others, I thought it would only be right that I first owned up to my own past use.

Maybe this will encourage others to be a bit more honest because, like it or not, admitting to smoking pot is bound to get a lot less scandalous.

Three states -- Colorado, Washington and Oregon -- have marijuana legalization proposals on the ballot, and it won't be surprising if at least one of them passes. Not medical marijuana, mind you, but the regulation and selling of small quantities for recreational use.

If you thought Nirvana and Pearl Jam put Seattle on the map, legal marijuana will make it out of this world.

And I promise that will be my last pot joke, although being silly about pot illustrates why it's taken this long for the country to begin adult conversations about marijuana, and not just knee-jerk rhetoric based on fear instead of facts. When President Nixon signed the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act, officially starting the so-called war on drugs, it was largely in response to pot-smoking hippies and Vietnam vets coming home addicted to heroin.

Nixon budgeted $100 million to fight what he called public enemy No. 1 -- illegal drugs. In 2010, it was $15 billion. A trillion dollars has been spent on the war on drugs since it began.
Two government reports released last year had difficulty proving the billions being spent are making a big difference.

In 1970, the federal government listed pot to be more harmful than cocaine and meth. We now know that isn't true. That's not to say legalizing pot is without risks; it has been shown to impair concentration. But one study found alcohol was by far the most dangerous drug, followed by heroin and crack. Weed rated far down the list.

So why do we continue to allow the Nixon administration's hatred of hippies to influence what we think about drug usage today?

I don't know how much or how little tax revenue is actually going to come from state-sanctioned pot, but to me that's not the point.

The issue isn't how much money the government can make from pot sales, but rather, are the reasons why pot was originally classified as illegal still valid today? Now that we have studies that debunk the myth of longtime impairment from using pot, now that we see how ineffective the government has been in keeping pot off the streets, now that we have seen the gangland violence of drug cartels, should we still be looking at marijuana the way we did 40 years ago?

In the 1928 presidential election, Herbert Hoover crushed his opponent, Al Smith, winning 40 states, in part because Smith was demonized as "the cocktail president." Smith was in favor of repealing the 18th Amendment -- Prohibition -- while Hoover believed he must enforce the law. It's hard to imagine today, but alcohol was so vilified then there was an actual Prohibition Party dedicated to keeping it illegal. Members even endorsed their own candidate for president.

Yet, just five years after that election, alcohol was legal. And even though Hoover lost his bid for re-election, he did so supporting the repeal.

That's how quickly things can change.

And that bit of history is what makes the results of these three states so fascinating. No one expects President Obama or Mitt Romney to come out in support of legalized marijuana within the next few days, but what will the conversation be like four years from now?

If the nation can go from upholding Prohibition to "drink up" in an election cycle, why couldn't 2016 feature the first pro-pot president? Especially if next week's results are, shall we say, favorable? Voting for a candidate solely because he or she lets you light up is stupid, but if all other things are equal, are we ready to vote to legalize marijuana the way our grandparents voted to legalize alcohol?

I think we are, but then one could say I'm a bit biased.
http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/30/opinion/granderson-legalize-pot/index.html?hpt=hp_bn7
 

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
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#3
What's wrong with you? If we legalize pot, people might actually smoke it. Your children could be smoking joints and ordering Domino's as we speak!
 

lajikal

Registered User
Aug 6, 2009
16,106
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#5
I feel safe with the federal government telling me that I can't smoke weed, not even in the privacy of my own home. Just feels warm as apple pie.
 

Konstantin K

Big League Poster
Aug 25, 2010
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#6
So how would this work? Are they going to be selling it at state stores like liquor? I assume you won't be able to stop at the 7-11 and pick up some pot with your Cheetos and Big Gulp (although that would kind of perfect).
 

MayrMeninoCrash

Liberal Psycopath
Dec 9, 2004
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#7
So how would this work? Are they going to be selling it at state stores like liquor? I assume you won't be able to stop at the 7-11 and pick up some pot with your Cheetos and Big Gulp (although that would kind of perfect).
It won't because these laws don't change anything on the Federal level. DEA will still control who or what sells marijuana.
 

Gorilla Pimp

Popped a molly i'm sweatin, WOO
Nov 2, 2009
3,269
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Mobile, AL
#11
Because locking up people for weed possession = big money nigga
 

Stormrider666

Hell is home.
Mar 19, 2005
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#13
Because then your pure Christian white daughters will be fornicating with Negros and Mexicans.
 

THE FEZ MAN

as a matter of fact i dont have 5$
Aug 23, 2002
42,613
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#15
Because criminal justice industry.
Bingo as long as there is money to be made busting pot heads it will be illegal not to mention all the people that are locked up longer than murders
 

BIV

I'm Biv Dick Black, the Over Poster.
Apr 22, 2002
78,981
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Seattle
#18
Bingo as long as there is money to be made busting pot heads it will be illegal not to mention all the people that are locked up longer than murders
Possession is not a federal crime. So if a state legalizes it, only the dealers have to look over their shoulder. Makes it a lot less cost effective for the feds to get involved.

And God damn your sig, Chino
 

lajikal

Registered User
Aug 6, 2009
16,106
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#19
Possession is not a federal crime. So if a state legalizes it, only the dealers have to look over their shoulder. Makes it a lot less cost effective for the feds to get involved.

And God damn your sig, Chino
Everything is a federal crime, including possession of small amounts of weed.
 

KRSOne

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
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#20
Big Pharma would lose money. Imagine if people could grow their own meds instead of having to pay 500$ for a pill.
 

Don the Radio Guy

G-Bb-A-D
Donator
Mar 30, 2006
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#21
Everything is a federal crime, including possession of small amounts of weed.
The current regime threatening to arrest state officials involved in legal medical dispensaries run by the state is proof of this.
 

Cunt Smasher

Caligula Jr.
Aug 26, 2005
13,413
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#22
Remember how they threatened to withhold federal highway funds if the states didn't impose the 55mph speed limit?
I would challenge anybody to prove the legality or illegality has a whole lot to do with consumption. Doesn't stop people that want it, doesn't mean everybody starts if its legalized.
 
#23
Its funny, I go into Vancouver about 3 times a month for work. Everyone smokes weed. They say that the only reason they can't legalize it completely (cops have stopped enforcing small amount possession) is because the US govt is putting pressure and it would fuck up the border.
 

KRSOne

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
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#25
Its funny, I go into Vancouver about 3 times a month for work. Everyone smokes weed. They say that the only reason they can't legalize it completely (cops have stopped enforcing small amount possession) is because the US govt is putting pressure and it would fuck up the border.
Canada sucks just as much as the US, they raided a guys house a few weeks ago because they thought he was growing, after ripping the plants out and getting them back to the station they found out it was just daisy's

Imagine if someone in your family was gunned down by trigger happy cops just because you had some wild daisy's in your yard.