WWE Saturday Morning Slam

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
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This show is already neutered and it hasn't even premiered yet.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1301791-wwe-saturday-morning-slams-rules-make-it-a-waste-of-time?search_query=100%20wrestling%20moves

BleacherReport.com said:
WWE: Saturday Morning Slam's Rules Make It a Waste of Time
By Mike Shannon (Featured Columnist) on August 17, 2012




According to this and other similar reports, WWE has set an "unspoken rule" for their new show Saturday Morning Slam, which debuts August 25. The report states that since the show will be aimed at children, wrestlers who work the program are not to perform any moves which target the neck of their opponent; this includes moves like headlocks, chinlocks, RKOs, neckbreakers, etc.

Why would you even have a wrestling show if you are going to have a ridiculous rule like that?

Full disclosure: I have been a wrestling fan for 25 years and many of those years were spent watching WWE programming on Saturday mornings as a child. All American Wrestling was a staple of my childhood along with the lesser known Action Zone and the syndicated Superstars broadcast.

At no time in my wrestling-watching history have I thought, Wow, this stuff is really violent; I really wish they would stop hurting everyone's necks with those headlocks. What kind of thinking is that?

WWE wants to remove these moves from the Saturday show because wrestling moves that target the neck are deemed as "violent" and therefore unnecessary. From what I can gather, WWE's belief is that children who see these moves performed on Saturday morning and will try the moves on their friends, causing injury and placing the wrestling promotion potentially liable for any injuries and damages.

Well, I have news for WWE: Wrestling is violent. Sure, it's predetermined, and workers are trained not to actually inflict pain on their opponents, but still, the purpose of professional wrestling is to give the illusion of violence while not actually performing it. The art form is over 100 years old and has survived for that long by performing headlocks and neckbreakers.

I realize that WWE is the only mainstream game in town right now (settle down, TNA fans, you're not in the big leagues just yet), but their quest to redefine what wrestling is has been a complete failure for the last ten years.

Ratings for the new three-hour Raws are in the toilet, live-event attendance is down across the country, the words "World Wrestling Entertainment" are punchlines in the popular culture and their biggest stars are semi-retired holdovers from the Attitude Era.

Now they are going to water down the product further by not only producing yet another unnecessary hour of television but also restrict workers and handcuff them before the match really begins.

Honestly, if WWE had their way, every single match would go exactly like this:

1. Both wrestlers make their entrance and do the exact same poses as last time they entered the ring. Both wrestlers will make 100 percent sure that they do not look at the live crowd under any circumstances because interaction with fans is boring.

2. The match begins, the babyface will hit a suplex and a couple punches to get the crowd going before the heel uses a cheapshot to turn the tide.

3. The heel works over the babyface (for God's sake, do not use a headlock) with the same bland heel offense that every single wrestler on the roster has (kick, punch, clothesline in the corner, hit the ringside barrier outside the ring).

4. Finally, the babyface takes advantage of the heel mistake, hits his two WWE-named trademark signature moves and then follows with his finisher because no WWE match is ever allowed to end with anything other than a finishing maneuver. Hell, we have to sell T-shirts somehow.

Now that's a little over the top but it's really not that far off. If Vince McMahon had his way today, WWE television would be nothing but awful comedy skits, pointless three-minute matches, and 20-minute interview skits inside the ring. This new Saturday Morning Slam just reinforces how out of touch Vince McMahon is with his audience's preferences.

Welcome to Hell, wrestling fans.
 

UCJOE

I have a lot of business with the Chinese
Mar 7, 2009
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Whoever this writer is left out "running the ropes"
I always hated that

I don't think this is a big deal though and most likely has to do with getting more advertising money for the network. I would guess these "rules" came from that
 

Don the Radio Guy

G-Bb-A-D
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What is this, dueling content farm day? Do yourselves a favor, download an extension for your browser that lets you block Bleacher Report from search results. The writers of those articles know less than we do.

As for the neck rule, that's nothing new. When was the last time you saw a piledriver done by anyone except Kane or Taker?

This has nothing to do with Vince. It has everything to do with being a public company with major sponsorships.
 
Feb 5, 2003
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If that's true (and I don't know how accurate it is since Wrestle Zone is apparently the best source for this story) then it's incredibly stupid. If they don't want neckbreakers and headlocks (I'll assume DDTs are also part of the list) because they target the neck and the show is targeted at kids, then why are neckbreakers, headlocks, and DDTs allowed on the other shows? After all, they are putting out a PG-rated show in order to get more kids watching. Is it somehow ok for kids to see Randy Orton perform a DDT with his opponent's feet on the 2nd rope if it's at 8:00 on Raw or Smackdown but not ok for that same kid to see a headlock on Saturday morning? Where's the logic in that?
 

Don the Radio Guy

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There is no logic. Toy companies are booking this shit. It's what happens when you take a wrestling company public.
 

transit grinder

Baglin' with the Sex
Apr 16, 2008
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A regular old punch seems infinitely more violent than something you would never use in a real fight, like the RKO.

Surprised they didn't take some sort of animated angle with this Saturday morning show.
 

Don the Radio Guy

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A regular old punch seems infinitely more violent than something you would never use in a real fight, like the RKO.

Surprised they didn't take some sort of animated angle with this Saturday morning show.
Kids don't break each others' necks with a punch. This whole thing reeks of a sponsor being afraid of lawsuits, and not understanding wrestling one bit. You can tell evil Vince isn't behind it because he knows a headlock isn't dangerous. It's a fucking rest hold, and he knows that.

That's why these Bleacher Report stories are so shitty. The idiots writing them have no idea how media businesses work, so they blame Vince for everything.
 

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
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#10
Kids don't break each others' necks with a punch. This whole thing reeks of a sponsor being afraid of lawsuits, and not understanding wrestling one bit. You can tell evil Vince isn't behind it because he knows a headlock isn't dangerous. It's a fucking rest hold, and he knows that.

That's why these Bleacher Report stories are so shitty. The idiots writing them have no idea how media businesses work, so they blame Vince for everything.
To be fair, sponsors don't have the authority to make directives to WWE talent. Vince has to make that call.
 

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
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#11
What is this, dueling content farm day? Do yourselves a favor, download an extension for your browser that lets you block Bleacher Report from search results. The writers of those articles know less than we do.
I didn't get this story through a search. I saw when I was looking at another wrestling item on the site (which was a stupid "Top 100 Moves" slideshow) and I thought it looked interesting. I'm not really a fan of the site. I only found it this month so I'm still just exploring it. I don't think it's going to be a site I check regularly.

As for the neck rule, that's nothing new. When was the last time you saw a piledriver done by anyone except Kane or Taker?
Don't forget Lawler.
 

Don the Radio Guy

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To be fair, sponsors don't have the authority to make directives to WWE talent. Vince has to make that call.
Actually it's probably Kevin Dunn. Vince has final authority of course, but he doesn't run the whole show. It happens at every level of media. Right down to a 3000 watt radio station in market 140. I've seen it with my own eyes and been told what not to say, in order to appease sponsors.

They want to make money. This makes them money. That's the bottom line.
 

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
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Actually it's probably Kevin Dunn.
That guy might be the all-time biggest piece of shit on WWE's corporate side (he's tied with Vince himself). He's easily Vince's biggest enabler and is the biggest supporter of the idea that WWE doesn't do wrestling. He hates wrestling. He loves his job (and paycheck), though. That's "sports entertainment", you see.
 

Don the Radio Guy

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Vince is Dunn's enabler. We know Vince has at least some respect for the business. He just likes money more.
 

UCJOE

I have a lot of business with the Chinese
Mar 7, 2009
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#15
So far so good

From Meltzer:
The debut of WWE Saturday Morning Slam on CW did a 0.7 rating, which was the highest rating of all the shows in CW's new kids block. A scary thing is it did more viewers than most episodes of last season's Ultimate Fighter.
 

Lord Zero

Viciously Silly
Aug 25, 2008
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#16
Vince is Dunn's enabler. We know Vince has at least some respect for the business. He just likes money more.
That's a good point, sir. Either way, Kevin Dunn is a cancer on the WWE's corporate side. He should be confined to his video package directing job (which he's genuinely good at) or be fired outright.